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Tonio_

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About Tonio_

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  1. So yeah. Basically title. And by quieter, I don't mean the presets are quieter, everything is quieter. I use my Helix as a soundcard, so I usually also listen to Spotify through it. As a general indicator, I'd say that when the volume knob on the Helix was at noon, it was already plenty loud. If I stood closer than a meter to my speakers (like if I had to do something on the laptop, which is between the speakers obviously), I'd have to turn it down, otherwise my ears would be toast. Now, to get the same level, I have to turn the volume knob on the Helix to around 2 o'clock. I didn't change anything at all between the time I started listening to some music and the time when my update was complete and I re-started listening to music. Didn't disconnect anything from the laptop, didn't disconnect anything from the Helix. Basically the only thing I touched was my mouse and my keyboard... Is anyone having the same problem? Is this normal? Thanks guys
  2. Tonio_

    A way to run 3 IRs?

    In parallel of course! I've actually found a way, will post a picture later. Basically, on Path 1, you split after the Amp block, have one of the IRs go out into Multi, while placing a Volume block (or anything with low DPS tbh) on the other split end of the path. Have the split path with the Volume block go into path B. Split path B, put 1 IR on each split path, merge the two paths together. Sounds great. Hmm... I don't agree. Mixing single mic IRs of the same brand, let's say a V30 from inside the Friedman 4x12, is actually a very good way of getting a desired mix going on. Considering the fact that the built in mics in the Helix are few all and the fact that you have to Hi Cut them in order to get a somewhat realistic sound, doing the same thing with IRs is just better, since you don't have to bother with EQs and you have plenty of different mic options at your disposal. The pre-mixed IRs from ML Sound Lab and Ownhammer do sound amazing indeed, but what if you want to customize the mic placements yourself? Say you want to have a really dark SM57 and a really bright R121. Let's say I want the following mics: a Mohave 200, a Shure SM7B and a Royer 121. Easy, I take the IRs, I audition the mic placements by themselves, then I blend them in to taste with the merge block. And no EQing needed whatsoever, meaning that you're 100% sure that you're not cutting "realistic" frequencies and that your virtual mic'd up speaker sounds just like a real mic'd up speaker. Because, IRs don't need any EQing, Hi/Lo Cutting or whatever to sound realistic, they are already the exact replica of a mic'd up speaker in a cab. A more extreme example: let's say I want to add a room mic to the whole deal (the MK84 for instance) and that I also want to have the 7B and the 121 on the same speaker. Just as easy! You take a pre-made mix that combines the 7B and the 121 (meaning that there are the little imperfections of both of the mics on the same speaker, something that a Cab block or 2 IR blocks can't reproduce), put the Mohave on another IR and then to top it off grab a "room mic" IR. Lots of options. Something more subtle would be to take a pre-mixed IR that you really like, let's say the Modern mix from Ownhammer that has the SM57 and the MD421, and you want to embelish that mix with some expensive mics :D So you take a Neumann U67 and maybe a Room placed MK84 or something like that to beef up and sparkle up the already great mix to begin with. Etc. etc. Soooo many options with 3 IR blocks, it's ridiculous.
  3. Tonio_

    A way to run 3 IRs?

    Hey guys I'm just wondering whether there is a way to run 3 IRs in the Helix. I know you can do it with Cabs and with Dual Amp setups, but what about just standard Single Amp tones? Thanks
  4. Like I said above, I'm not looking for a "magic EQ". And of course, I adjust all my "pre-EQ" per amp model and per patch, I don't just keep the same stuff and stick a different amp model or IR on it. There were lots of discussions about IRs and onboard Cabs needing hi-cuts in order to sound less harsh. Is this due to the fact that Helix Amp models have a larger frequency range than the real thing or is it due to IRs and onboard Cabs themselves. What I mean by 'where do I need to cut' is at which point in the chain do I perform the cut, not the actual number.
  5. Yeah I think I didn't make myself clear enough in the end :') I'm not searching for an actual EQ curve or a specific number or anything. I'm just wondering if the Helix Amps models have the same frequency range as the actual amps they are based on. If they don't, where do I need to place the hi cut/lo cut (as in before or after the cab block, or maybe before the amp, or maybe inside the IR block itself) in order to make it sound more realistic? I think I'll edit my OP, cause it seems I finally managed to formulate the question properly. As far as my shaping EQ cuts go, they are pretty shallow, so they lower the honky and whistly frequencies just slightly. That way, I can still fine tune in the DAW if I need to.
  6. Hey guys, first time posting on here, so be gentle please :) So I've had my Helix for about 3 months now and I've pretty much conquered all there is to conquer settings-wise for each block. However, there is one thing I'm still struggling with getting right and that is: frequencies. I'm not using the Helix Cabs, I solely rely on IRs since I love the Friedman BE-100, so I got the Ownhammer 6-pack Friedman cab. First of all, I have a hi-cut/lo-cut block set at the very end of every chain with cuts at about 70-100hz and 10-12khz, in order to avoid having to do that in my DAW once I've recorded a track. So its basically a mastering/mixing thing to have all my recording patches ready to go without having to fiddle with the EQ in the DAW too much. (I also have a couple of parametric EQs set to eliminate all the noisy frequencies for each patch also to avoid having to do that in the DAW every time, yes I'm that lazy. But to be honest, it did take some time finding those frequencies and eliminating them in the DAW in the first place and then copying over that stuff to the Helix, so maybe not so lazy after all?). Obviously each mix is different and tracks with the same sound preset might have to be EQ'd differently in every mix, but the honky and whistly and useless frequencies still stay the same, right? I don't go nuts on the little cuts though, only a few db here and there to slightly attenuate the noisy stuff, then I still fine tune in the DAW if I need to. So, I seem to understand that the Helix cab models and IRs cover the whole frequency range whereas actual speakers/cabs cover only up until 5K or so (I'm slightly confused at to whether the actual amp models themselves cover the same frequency range as real amps). Obviously, I'm not interested in getting a "cab in the room" sort of sound, because modelers aren't meant for that. I do however, want to replicate as accurately as possible a "mic'd up cab" and I'm a bit confused on up until where do I need to hi-cut in order to get that sound or if I need to cut at all. Please enlighten me on how the whole frequency thing works in the Helix. Like where do I need to cut to replicate that "mic'd up cab" sound? Just looking for a real professional sounding studio/recording tone and need some advice, to put it bluntly. EDIT: I'm not searching for an actual EQ curve or a specific number or anything. I'm wondering if the Helix Amps models have the same frequency range as the actual amps they are based on. If they don't, where do I need to place the hi cut/lo cut (as in before or after the cab block, or maybe before the amp, or maybe inside the IR block itself) in order to make it sound more realistic? I'm not really sure if I could make my question clear, but I hope I did! If anyone is kind enough to take the time to write up a long post about this, I'd be extremely greatful! :) Thanks in advance.
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