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greigmcmillan

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About greigmcmillan

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    Just Startin'
  1. Wow Colonel Forbin, these are such in depth responses! I'll have to read them several times to take it all in. I,ve never tried then complete dream rig and it would be interesting to try my patches through a dt amp. My aim though was to not have an amp and go straight to the pa. Many advantages to this including less stage noise, less stage space, less stuff to carry. I did think about an l2m as it's full range flat response, good for the house, studio and portability. Really like your last post with the same Pedal layout but changing amps. That would pretty much cover any situation! I'm still not sure how the acoustic part works. Surely you would need lots of dsp to have dual amp patches and your fx blocks? Good work, let me know how you get on with that. I'm sure others will be very interested in this as well.
  2. Do you think the same would work with an L2m in terms of DI'ing and micing up?
  3. thanks to everyone for their input. It seems the overriding thing here is to cut the bass and apply more mids. To be honest I haven't really experimented with mid in the past I just kind of float about with it. Bass and treble are usually what I zone in on and yeah I keep an eye on the presence to make sure its not too bright or too dull. I'll definitely experiment. Your totally right about tweaking patches at higher volume. I usually set them up roughly at home and then tweak them when their louder at rehearsal. Trouble is you don't get that much of a chance as everyone wants to crack on with the set. I should really book the rehearsal studio just for myself for a few hours and get the patches sorted. Cheers.
  4. Yeah fair point. I'll give it a go. If anything it will polish up my playing. I'll have a search for some backing tracks. Thanks.
  5. Thanks for listening to them. Yeah, I'll defo take on board reducing the bass. I usually turn the thump up to 70% as well. I should have added though that I use a JTV69 set to Lester 1. Maybe that would affect your thoughts on how bassy they are? Depends on what you were using to play the patches. I don't feel that the bass is too much, its just nice and full, powerfull, but I guess when its in the mix next to the full band it might get lost. Interestingly on one of the patches although I used the same amp and cab (Treadplate with V30) I changed to Lester 4 and instead of 57 off axis I used a 67 condensor. On this track the guitar seemed to cut through more. Maybe I'll experiment a bit more with that. I changed to 57 off axis as I read loads on the forums that people thought this was best for hi-gain sounds. Everyones different though!
  6. Good idea. I actually did this when learning the songs but I used the real tracks with guitar in it. I played over the top and panned my guitar left and the real band right. It was good to get an idea how close the sounds are and how accurate my playing was but I guess my ear would still be tricked by the real guitar. Backing tracks would let me hear my patches and see if they fit like the real song. Only thing is recording and live are very different!
  7. Tom Sawyer.txtSpirit Of Radio2.txtThe Big Money$.txt Hopefully this time?
  8. I don't think that worked at all! How do you drop patches into this post? I just dragged them from HDEdit but didn't seem to work.......
  9. Hopefully these will work....... TomSawyer.h5e TheBigMoney$.h5e SpiritOfRadio2.h5e
  10. Thanks for responding, even though i've put this in the wrong place! Yeah some recordings were the iphone and some were straight from desk and some from pretty nifty portable zoom recorders - but in all of them the guitar was just not up there enough. Thats not me being self indulgent it just genuinely isn't loud enough in the mix. Yeah I take your point about sound guys but most of them we use are pretty good overall, they just don't push the guitar. I think a bit of eking on the pod might help though. Good idea to get out front, I think I need to do that next soundcheck. Thanks.
  11. Thanks for all the response. The sound guys we have are pretty good to be honest, in all other respects i.e stage sound, great drum sound, great vocal sound great IEM mix, just seems to lack guitar out front. I've got a feeling it might be an eq issue as some of you have mentioned. A lot of the patches use a fair bit of compression and chorus - but thats what Alex Lifeson uses (Rush) and you can always hear him! I'll add a few patches and see what you think. I'm deco open to any criticisim/suggestions on the patches. Hopefully I won't have to reconstruct them completely but some helpful eq and compression tips I reckon might crack it.
  12. Sorry - I posted this in the wrong forum! I've now added it to POD HD forum.
  13. Hi, I've played about four gigs now in fairly large rooms. I go straight from my POD to the PA and use IEM's to hear myself. This all works great and has so many benefits for the rest of the band..........less stage noise by having no guitar amp, no bleed into mice, no feedback. The thing is I've listened to recordings of those gigs from iPhones, from recording devices, from straight out the desk and every time, the guitar is really quiet! My clean sounds seem to cut through, my solo's can be heard but general heavyish rhythm parts just can't be heard. There sort of mush in the background. Ive spent ages working on my patches and I balance all the levels between them so thats not an issue. It just seems that when i'm playing through the song the guitar sounds like its squished into a corner of the room or something. I play in a Rush tribute band so songs like Tom sawyer and Spirit of Radio have nice big (but not mega heavy) guitar sounds. I'm pretty pleased with the patches and at home and at rehearsals they sound close to the real deal. I can turn the PA at rehearsal up loud without clipping these patches so why doesn't the sound engineer at these gigs do that? Is it just because maybe they don't know the songs so keep the guitar at a level they think is decent or do you think I've got too much of a gap between my solo boost and my normal song level? If that was the case though surely the engineer could just turn me down at solo's if they were too loud? I'm starting to think that the sound guy's set the levels on the desk for the loudest level they get i.e the solo and just leave it there. Then when you're playing the main song at a lower level - the guitar is way too quiet. Any ideas? I'm really starting to think I might have to go back to playing through an amp which I don't really want to do but I'm getting fed up with low guitar at the gigs. For some patches I'm going to look again at the amount of compression I use, but thats not on all of them and even if it was - it should be even easier for the sound guy to turn me up as my level should be more balanced with the compressor smoothing things out. Just wondering if anyone had experienced the same or can think of something I'm doing wrong. Thanks
  14. Hi, I've played about four gigs now in fairly large rooms. I go straight from my POD to the PA and use IEM's to hear myself. This all works great and has so many benefits for the rest of the band..........less stage noise by having no guitar amp, no bleed into mice, no feedback. The thing is I've listened to recordings of those gigs from iPhones, from recording devices, from straight out the desk and every time, the guitar is really quiet! My clean sounds seem to cut through, my solo's can be heard but general heavyish rhythm parts just can't be heard. There sort of mush in the background. Ive spent ages working on my patches and I balance all the levels between them so thats not an issue. It just seems that when i'm playing through the song the guitar sounds like its squished into a corner of the room or something. I play in a Rush tribute band so songs like Tom sawyer and Spirit of Radio have nice big (but not mega heavy) guitar sounds. I'm pretty pleased with the patches and at home and at rehearsals they sound close to the real deal. I can turn the PA at rehearsal up loud without clipping these patches so why doesn't the sound engineer at these gigs do that? Is it just because maybe they don't know the songs so keep the guitar at a level they think is decent or do you think I've got too much of a gap between my solo boost and my normal song level? If that was the case though surely the engineer could just turn me down at solo's if they were too loud? I'm starting to think that the sound guy's set the levels on the desk for the loudest level they get i.e the solo and just leave it there. Then when you're playing the main song at a lower level - the guitar is way too quiet. Any ideas? I'm really starting to think I might have to go back to playing through an amp which I don't really want to do but I'm getting fed up with low guitar at the gigs. For some patches I'm going to look again at the amount of compression I use, but thats not on all of them and even if it was - it should be even easier for the sound guy to turn me up as my level should be more balanced with the compressor smoothing things out. Just wondering if anyone had experienced the same or can think of something I'm doing wrong. Thanks
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