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Title Genre Difficulty

Essential Guitar - Column 11

Jazz Intermediate

A look at some of the most practical applications of the diminished scale in guitar playing and improvisation.

Essential Guitar - Column 2

Blues Intermediate

Let's continue with the next letter of the CAGED system, A. An open A major chord is commonly found in the first position on the fingerboard and can be seen as a shape that lines up the fretted notes E, A and C# as a barre on the fourth, third and second strings.

Essential Guitar - Column 3

Blues

Let's plunge right in with the next letter of the CAGED system: G. An open G major chord is commonly found in the first position on the fingerboard as a form that contains all six strings.

Essential Guitar - Column 4

Blues Intermediate

The next letter of the CAGED system is E. Like the G chord, an open E major chord is commonly found in the first position as a form that contains all six strings. This fingering form yields a very useable shape that is the basis for the most common barre chord, as well as the infamous "blues box" of guitar lore.

Essential Guitar - Column 5

Blues Intermediate

The final letter of the CAGED system is D. An open D major chord is commonly found in the first position on the fingerboard as a four–note form built from the fourth string root. By re–fingering the chord with all four fingers and moving it to the seventh position the D shape now becomes an A chord.

Essential Guitar 13

Lesson Beginner

Introduction to the Whole Tone Scale

Fingering Tips for the Finger Tips, Part 9

Metal / Shred Intermediate

Some of the most creative rules-breaking, when it comes to scales and Tri-Chord fingerings, has been committed by players like Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhoads and George Lynch in the guitar-intensive music of the eighties.

Getting It, Part 2: Steps to Guitar Mastery via West Coast Blues

Blues Intermediate

Making imitated licks into useable new material for future “on the fly” improvisation.

Getting It, Part 3: Steps to Guitar Mastery via West Coast Blues

Blues Intermediate

In any good conversation it’s nice to have a point. Musically, this is where you pull out your assimilated and repurposed melodies and give your listeners a re-interpretation. But how do we get there from here?

Getting It, Part 4: Steps to Guitar Mastery via West Coast Blues

Blues Intermediate

Steps to Guitar Mastery via “West Coast Blues”

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