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frmat

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About frmat

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  1. Of course it isn't. Perhaps I should have named the topic differently. It is my understanding that use in the actual Linux environment will not be possible until Line 6 decides to develop software to support it. However, the obvious benefit of this setup is not having to reboot into a different OS to connect your Pod. Also, the guest OS in virtualbox can share dedicated folders with the host system, so that you have easy acess to anything that might be relevant to your work.
  2. To whom it may concern; here's how you get your POD HD Pro to function properly with a linux based OS. First off, you need a supported OS to run inside of your Linux OS, so get yourself a disc image (.iso) of Windows/OS-X. Note that I have only tried this with Windows XP Pro 32-bit under Ubuntu 12.04, so I really have no idea whether or not it works the same for OS-X and/or other hosts. Next, you'll need to set up a virtual system using a neat application called VirtualBox. Instructions on how to do this can be found in this video: (Virtualbox can be downloaded from https://www.virtualbox.org/) Now, once you've got your virtual system up and running and have installed the guest additions and what not, there are a few steps you need to take in order to enable USB support in you guest OS: 1. Shut down your virtual machine. 2. Connect your Pod. 3. In the Virtualbox UI, go to the virtual machine's "settings" page. 4. Under the "USB" tab, make sure that the option "Enable USB controller" is checked. Make sure the option "Enable USB 2.0 (EHCI) controller" is NOT checked. 5. Below the two aforementioned options is a list of USB device filters (probably empty). Click the small icon on the right hand side to add a filter, you should see your Pod listed along with any other connected devices. Create a filter for the Pod (no need to change any filter settings), and make sure it is checked. 6. There is a user group created by VirtualBox, called "vboxusers". You need to add yourself to this group. If you do not have the "Users and Groups" application in your user interface, open a terminal and enter the following command: sudo adduser "username" vboxusers, "username" being whatever your username is (without the quotation marks). 7. Reboot your computer. 8. Run your virtual machine and connect you Pod. If it isn't recognized by the guest OS, look under "Devices"»"USB devices" in the top menu bar. Make sure the Pod is checked. That should be just about it, although I may have left something out.
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