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rareearthmusic

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About rareearthmusic

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  1. We used to do this with a keyboard into a Fender RocPro half stack as a keyboard amp for stage use. I don't believe it had a volume knob for it but I also did this with a rack mount preamp into a 200 watt power amp that had a knob. I would use the volume knob on the amp as the final volume that went through the speakers. So, run your Helix at whatever level you'd like and into the loop return, using the FX loop knob as your "master volume". I'd start there and experiment if you feel that's needed. I feel like that gave me better control of volume overall. You should be fine with that setup, though. Good luck.
  2. ^^^THIS. Churches are notorious for being terrible at cable management. If each group took responsibility of their own setups, it would mitigate nearly all of the issues, I feel. Perhaps taking an off-church day during the week and going there to set things up a bit more permanently and run cables more efficiently is a better solution. Maybe even having a member of each group that uses the area each week could be present and an arrangement made that pleases everyone would be in order. In my experience, many churches don't have lots of money to spend on extra things no matter how easy it makes things go. I hope this helps.
  3. Having been familiar with the UI from the native software plugin I've been using in the studio, using HX Edit makes sense for me. But really, building something at home I'm usually in the studio and the unit is plugged into the computer so it's a mix of using the computer and the hardware unit. I wouldn't hesitate to use the hardware on its own, but for me the combo makes it easy for me. I've only played a couple gigs with my hardware unit so I made sure I knew the basics of it before I took it on the road. I built a few patches of my own on the unit only and then made a few on the software only. That helped me get a basic understanding of how to change something on the fly if I needed to at a gig. Hope this helps.
  4. Stacking drives in this way is exactly how I've run my amp/pedal setup for years. The Teemah! sounds great on its own and also stacked with others. I found a great combo in stacking it with the Kinky Boost with the Kinky last in the signal chain (generally going low gain > high gain from guitar input and stacking). I then program one of the foot switches to engage a volume boost on any combo of 3 overdrives I set for leads, etc. I've never been into using different combos of amps for different tones instead opting for one amp and using pedals to dictate my tonal needs (usually differing amounts of drive). I think if I were in a show band where all the instruments were trying to sound period-correct, I'd be more apt to program things with different amp models to match genre. But in a bar/clubsituation, it doesn't matter too much and those who don't know about tone don't care. I stick with what's comfortable and sounds good to me. My 2 cents.
  5. I recently became a Helix convert, sort of by necessity. I'd been looking at the hardware units as I've had access to the native plugin for my studio for a while now. Took the plunge and have played a couple of shows already with it. I also recently had hand surgery on my right hand and cannot lift more than 5 pounds. My regular amp rig is similar to yours (6 watt VHT tube head, 112 cab--each in their own road cases, a medium sized pedal board, and a case for carrying cables and other accessories, plus 2 guitars in hard cases). Although the rig itself is "small", it's still quite heavy and unwieldy for me right now. First gig with the Helix: showed up, plugged the board into power, plugged guitar cable into Helix, put my 2 guitars on a double guitar stand and I was DONE. It took MAYBE 5 minutes and I could carry it all with one hand, however slow that would be. I thought I'd miss having an amp behind me. I don't. Even without in ear monitors, which I use regularly, I get plenty of what I need from provided floor wedges. Playing smaller clubs or pubs might be an issue, monitoring-wise, but so far I haven't had a problem. My first show with it was a large outdoor stage with a huge system. It sounded great. The next show was in a smaller, indoor club. It sounded great there, too. And exactly the same as the first show. A big annoyance for me is power variations in different venues creating tone anomalies, especially with pedals. Doesn't happen with Helix. Anyway, all this to say, if you don't wanna lug around an amp forever, the LT is probably your better option as you'll be able to phase out the amp in the future. With the HX, you're stuck with the amp. I hope this helps you.
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