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phoo

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About phoo

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  1. I believe you are onto something, in that Windows 10, Chrome, has something to do with it. I have four computers - 3 laptops and a desktop. Three of them have Windows 10, on Windows 7. All four have the same audio apps, and are setup for the same external hardware (USB2 and USB3). The desktop uses a ZOOM UAC-8. It's my main audio DAW. One older laptop has only 4G of memory, runs Win7, another had 8G, came with Win8.1 and upgraded to Win10, and has been a major disappointment since day one. It's been relegated to internet use only...put out to pasture. I still use the Win7 machine for GuitarPort only - it too slow for current Chrome - too little RAM. Chrome is my browser of choice on all four. One thing Chrome does is suck up memory, specifically when Facebook is up. One session of Facebook will use as much a 2G of memory for that one process after a time...as if it's leaking. Even though there are 5 tabs open as my default web pages only Facebook does this, so I blame it for many Chrome issues. That said, Chrome itself seems to be one issue why Facebook uses so much. Other browsers use a lot when logged into facebook in them, but not as much as when in Chrome and they don't seem to go up. Facebook is alway loading data so we can scroll down to it. Regardless, Chrome uses 2-4G of RAM for the whole session, typically, all pages. Even 4G usage isn't that bad in the big scheme of things if the machine has enough physical RAM in the first place. It does seems typical usage for Chrome with my tabs. My machines are 16G (newer main laptop - came with Windows 10), 12G DAW desktop (is upgrade to Win10 from Win7). 8G (newer crappy laptop - came with Win8.1, upgraded to Win10), 4G (older laptop, came with Vista, upgraded to Win7, upgraded to Win10, wiped clean, restored to Vista and upgraded to Win7...added regkeys to prevent the automatic unwanted upgrade to Win10 which is how it happened in the first place....UGH). (I have these regkeys for DL if anyone wants them.) I've had all these machines for over a year, and three of them over 3 years each. While Chrome uses a lot of RAM, only the newer main laptop is having blue screen issues. The one difference? It's the only one the UX2 is installed on. The blue screen started after installing the UX2. I suspect two things, neither of which we can do anything about easily. 1) It's memory fragmentation. Even though there's plenty of physical RAM, if it's fragmented and someone needs big chunks, as the UX2 might need via the ASIO drivers then all bets are off. Someone is running out of contiguous memory and not handling it well. And 2) There is memory corruption in the ASIO driver. Past experience (my day job for almost 20 years) has shown many times this to be an issue with drivers that try to be super low latency while not being high CPU users. Some of the first ASIO drivers to come out years ago were great but very unstable. (Rule of thumb was to cold reboot before a session, then cold reboot when done.) Yes, it's possible and likely both of these issues are the "cause" in that they set up the scenario someone isn't handling well. There are other gotchas that are relevant. Insertion and removal of the USB Audio Device, the UX2, forcing Windows tries to flip around what it's current audio device is. I'm keeping a eye on "exactly" what the situation is then a blue screen happens. Have I removed the UX2? (usually) Is the audio app still open? (no). None of the audio apps will automatically switch to the default audio device, by design. Other apps, and Windows itself will, and sometimes it's flaky, as when using bluetooth. The blue screens are unrelated to bluetooth. Don't use bluetooth device very often. I've found that rebooting, working with the UX2, and rebooting, is making this situation better. Sorry for the book. Hope it helps us all get thinking. (especially the devs....grin)
  2. The issue is random blue screens after using the UX2 for a while. The error is BAD POOL CALLER (or maybe BAD POOL HEADER). This doesn't stay on screen long enough to get all the info. (my past experience is this is usually memory corruption of some kind...but not exclusively) I have a UX2, driver version 4.2.7.6 and firmware 1.02, running on Win10, with goshknowswhat updates Microsoft has pushed down recently (two forced reboots this week for updates). Regardless, it's all up to date as far as can be updated at the moment. Also running POD Farm 2, version 2.59. I use Reaper for recording/mixing, and Adobe Audition 3.0 for all other audio needs. The BSOD is totally new and started within a day or so of installing and using the UX2. The setup is as-is for more than a year, except for the addition of the UX2. I also have a GuitarPort - many years old. It's never blue screened. The UX2 was bought as a replacement for the GuitarPort. Installing the UX2 seemed to pull down more up to date drivers (could be just timing as I hadn't tried to update the GuitarPort in a while) Except for updating the drivers and software, which are up to date, are there any suggestions to work around this? I'm assuming it's a driver issue, as any user level code (POD Farm) is mostly isolated from direct access to the kernel where the crashing is happening (that is what the driver is for afterall). (Yes, I know Microsoft is making it hell for audio driver developers with the constant updates, and Win10 in general. Many of us are not happy campers because of this.) Thanks!
  3. I pulled out my old First Edition Variax 300 and got it working yesterday. It had been in its case for a couple of years because I moved. When put in the case it was working well. I had set of replacement piezos, and had replaced one before the move. Found another dead yesterday and replaced it. All six strings are working as expected...sort of. The sound, of all strings, sound like there is some ring modulation happening. It's much more noticeable with the higher notes, especially the high E and B strings. These are bad even when played open. This makes the guitar unusable. It does not sound like a grounding issue, as there is no hum. It's an artifact of the electronics as far as I can tell. This ring mod sound is not audible when listening to the un-amplified strings. Also, the many different models all sound fine. It will work off of a new battery for about 10 seconds then cut out (bad battery bunch? maybe), but does fine with the power supply and no battery. There are artifacts on both battery and PS so this does not appear to be a PS filtering issue. Any ideas? I will get an audio clip later if needed. I'm not a drummer and not a guitar player so my playing is...uh....it sucks....but I have done guitar repair for years so I'm OK with all that....just can't play well. (grin) THANKS!!!
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