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happycats0199

Do I Have To Model An Amp On My Hd 500 If I Am Running Through My Physical Amp?

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Hi - looking for advice. I am running my HD 500 through my Vox AC 30 for live sound. Can I use the pod to just model the effects and not model an amp on the pod? Not sure if my ears are lying to me or not, but it seems at times that it muddies up the sound when i have an amp modeled on the pod (along with effects) and then run the output through my vox (clean). Anyone have any experience on that? should i be doing effects only and setting amp  model to (none)?

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No, you don't need an amp model. It can be strictly effects. Search the forums for the four cable method (4CM) to get the most out of the effects. Not sure if AC30 has fx loop or not. Enjoy!

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maybe turn off cabs and use just the head or pre-amps.  Experiment around ... there are no rules ... let us know how it works out.  There is a LINE and AMP switch you can mess with too.  Its near the PAD/NORMAL switch.

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For effects only, make sure the pod output mode is set to anything other than Stack/Combo Front and that the amp is set to 'none'

 

If you do want to use amp models then make sure your pod output mode is set to Combo Front and try messing with the EQ settings (Section 2 of the advanced manual).  You can adjust the High, Low and Focus (midrange) settings to make the amp modelling sound more natural with your amp.  The default values are not great for everyone and are meant to be tweaked for each amp.

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For effects only, make sure the pod output mode is set to anything other than Stack/Combo Front 

 

That makes a lot of sense, something I hadn't thought of. Though it would be preferable to set it to Studio/Direct rather than combo, stack or power amp right?

 

 

 

the amp is set to 'none'

 

Is switching the amp block off the same?

 

s

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That makes a lot of sense, something I hadn't thought of. Though it would be preferable to set it to Studio/Direct rather than combo, stack or power amp right?

 

 

 

 

Is switching the amp block off the same?

 

s

 

For effects only, the power and studio modes both behave the same.  It is only the Front modes that apply an EQ even with the amp model turned off.

 

and yes, switching the amp model off should have the same result as removing it.

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It is only the Front modes that apply an EQ even with the amp model turned off.

 

Does it also apply to Combo and Stack output modes?

 

Looking at the Advanced Guide it states:

 

The signal includes “Live†Cab Models, with no Mic Model or “AIR†convolution, with a special EQ curve added for each.

 

s

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There are Combo Front and Stack Front modes:  these will have an eq applied,whether you are using an amp model or not.

There are Combo Power and Stack Power modes - these will not have an eq applied when the amp is disabled or 'none'

 

Make sense?  

 

TBH I cannot see why they have the EQ curve in the front modes for an effects  only connection but there is probably a rationalle that I have not grokked.

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There are Combo Front and Stack Front modes: 

 

There are Combo Power and Stack Power modes

 

There are also Combo and Stack output modes that aren't Combo Power Amp and Stack Power Amp respectively.

 

I understand Combo Power Amp but what exactly is the difference between Combo and Combo Front, same question for Stack and Stack Front.

 

pp 2.8 & 2.9 of the Advanced Guide.

 

s

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I'm German and English is not my mother tongue. But to me it was clear from the beginning Front = front panel (where you plug your guitar in!) ;)

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I'm German and English is not my mother tongue. But to me it was clear from the beginning Front = front panel (where you plug your guitar in!) ;)

 

My mistake, I misread the options on page 2.8 and 2.9.   To me it looked like there were three options

 

1. Combo

2. Combo Front

3. Combo Power Amp.

 

I was wondering what is the difference between 1 & 2.

 

It made more sense when I switched on the unit to find only the last two options.

 

s

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Correct me if I'm wrong but the HD won't be true bypass when the amp models are off. If that is what you're after of course

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True bypass IMHO means, output is exact the same signal than input.

When you have a look on how the POD works you will see, that this can never happen:

  1. different input options
  2. the mixer
  3. different output options
  4. a/d d/a conversion

If you need a raw guitar output and a edited signal from the POD, you will have to split the signal before the input.

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True bypass IMHO means, output is exact the same signal as input.

 

Yes and many pedalboards have this feature, not sure why it was left out on the pod but I guess I rarely used it on previous boards.

 

s

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Yes and many pedalboards have this feature, not sure why it was left out on the pod but I guess I rarely used it on previous boards.

 

s

IMHO there is no sense for a real bypass. Your guitar signal - if not a active system - is low, so that every electrical resistance (cable, jacks, switch) will change your signal slight.

So it is regardless if you have a bypass of the whole system or if you go through with no fx or amp, the signal is always slight changed.

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It is a question of degree and scenario.

 

With True Bypass:  the resistance of jacks and internal is typically very low (an order of a few ohms) and if your cables runs are short will probably sound more transparent than buffered pedals.

 

On the other hand, with longer cables, resistance builds up and cross cable capacitance can become a real issue, sucking off high end and in that case True Bypass does you no favours anyway.  A good buffer is more helpful to your sound and will retain clarity.  Higher end pedalboard rigs often use a decent buffer pedal (e.g. CAE line driver ) at strategic points in their pedal chain to reduce this factor. 

 

On the Pod HD.  Nah, definitely not True Bypass.  There are at least two A/D conversions (four if you use the FX loop) so you do need to factor in some small loss of resolution with the Pod In line.  In practice though, the Pod A/D converters are pretty good and you would have to listen hard to discern any difference.

 

There is no way to 'True Bypass' individual effects in an effects only setup but you can bypass the entire POD either by running it in a switchable FX loop on your amp or using a True Bypass switcher to take it out of the line completely.   Products from companies like Lehle will do this or alternatively rig up a simple homebrew switcher like this

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