Jump to content
waynewright515

Marshall Speaker Connections

Recommended Posts

Hi all.  I have a Pod Go and absolutely love it.

 

Recently, I bought a Marshall 212 cab to connect to my Pod Go, and can barely hear any sound coming out of it.  I have researched and researched Google and You Tube videos to find a solution, but have come up empty.

 

There has to be something I'm not doing right, because the Marshall speakers should work just fine.  I'm using the amp (not preamp) in my presets, so I can't understand why I'm barely hearing anything.

 

The Marshall speakers are not powered, but that shouldn't be a problem since I'm using the power amp in the Pod Go, right?  I mean a power amp is a power amp, right?  Maybe there's a setting I'm missing?

 

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, waynewright515 said:

….

 

The Marshall speakers are not powered, but that shouldn't be a problem since I'm using the power amp in the Pod Go, right?  I mean a power amp is a power amp, right?  ….

No, that’s not right. Your external speakers need to be powered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, so forgive the stupid question here, but how does everyone else ever use these? They have no AC power plug in.

 

Not trying to be a smart lollipop, but I’m kind of a newb with some of this technology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, waynewright515 said:

Ok, so forgive the stupid question here, but how does everyone else ever use these? They have no AC power plug in.

 

Not trying to be a smart lollipop, but I’m kind of a newb with some of this technology.

 

Old-school, traditional guitar cabinets (which is what you have) are passive. They require a power amp to drive them... be it the power section of a head, or a separate stand alone power amp...it's always been that way.

 

The PodGo has no power section... the signal it puts out is line- level, that's it. Digital models of amplifiers cannot drive real-world, physical speakers...doesn't work that way. 1's and 0's can't push air. Modeled power sections mimic how those amps affect/ contribute to a rig's tone, but that's where it ends. You need a power amp between the POD and that cabinet if you want to hear anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, waynewright515 said:

They have no AC power plug in.

No, not that kind of power. A power amp. Such as a Marshall head, such as the Marshall JCM800 2203X 100-watt Tube Head. 

 

4 hours ago, waynewright515 said:

Ok, so forgive the stupid question here, but how does everyone else ever use these?

I plug my modeler straight into the PA system (or recording console, when in the studio). 

Others plug into the FX loop of their amp. Some plug into the front side. There is no one way to do it. 

 

4 hours ago, waynewright515 said:

Not trying to be a smart lollipop, but I’m kind of a newb with some of this technology.

We were all new once. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, waynewright515 said:

forgive the stupid question here, but how does everyone else ever use these? They have no AC power plug in.

 

As already suggested, in your case you need to use a real (not modelled) power amp and it should be connected between your POD and your cab by using standard jack cables.

If you instead connected the POD directly to the PA or to a powered/active monitor, no real additional power amp would be needed.

 

You can easily find handy power amps in the form of stomp boxes, small and affordable, such as the EHX 44 Magnum Guitar Power Amp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all.  It all makes sense to me now.  Plus I have an excuse to buy more stuff.  I like the idea of the stomp box size/style of the power amp.

8 hours ago, cruisinon2 said:

 

Old-school, traditional guitar cabinets (which is what you have) are passive. They require a power amp to drive them... be it the power section of a head, or a separate stand alone power amp...it's always been that way.

 

The PodGo has no power section... the signal it puts out is line- level, that's it. Digital models of amplifiers cannot drive real-world, physical speakers...doesn't work that way. 1's and 0's can't push air. Modeled power sections mimic how those amps affect/ contribute to a rig's tone, but that's where it ends. You need a power amp between the POD and that cabinet if you want to hear anything.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, waynewright515 said:

Plus I have an excuse to buy more stuff.  I like the idea of the stomp box size/style of the power amp.

 

Truth be told, if you want to get excited and you want to buy new stuff... 

 

You need to dump the Marshall cab and forget about buying a pedal sized power amp to run it. 

Focus on buying some sort flat system - personal/mini PA system. Studio monitors. FRFR. etc 

 

It is the entire point of modeling. 

As example, the Pod provides the Marshall cab tone. You need something that allows you to hear that Marshall cab tone as it was intended to be heard. 

If you have a Marshall cab, everything you put into it is going to sound like it is coming out of a Marshall cab. So, if the Pod is putting a Marshall cab tone into a Marshall cab, it is going to sound like garbage. Tone on top of tone. If you put no model into a Marshall cab, it will sound like a Marshall cab. If you put  Fender model into a Marshall cab, it will sound like garbage. 

See where I am going with this. You need a nice clear system that allows you to get out of it what you put into it. 

 

And I always say get 2 for stereo. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To expand on this a little - 

Basically, if you can't play your pre-recorded audio (MP3, CD, Vinyl, etc) through it, don't use it with a modeler. 

 

Of course, some audio systems aren't all that neutral either.

A pair of 'earbuds' or a set of computer speakers, they usually add 'bass reflex'. While they are designed for your pre-recorded music, they add flavor that you don't want with a modeler. 

 

 

The ultimate goal is to be able to hear what you designed, and do so in a manner that allows everyone else to hear the same thing. 

Meaning - if you gave me your patch, it would sound the same when I play it on my rig. If you recorded direct from your modeler, the playback tone would be exactly the same. If you played live (running direct to PA), the crowd would hear exactly the same sound as you hear out of your personal monitor  

 

 

Don't get me wrong, it is your unit, your tone, your career/hobby. Do what you want. I mean, it is music, there are no rules. Even if there were rules, it wouldn't be rock and roll if we didn't break them. 

But, in general, the goal is to be the 'same'. Same when I am in my bedroom. Same when in the garage for rehearsal. Same when I am in the studio. Same when on a beer room dance floor. Same in a 5,000 seat hall. Same in a 50,000 seat arena.

And most importantly, same when I am out of town without my gear and someone says to me "hey, my guitarist broke their hand, can you sit in tonight". >> A quick download of my patches and I am ready to go. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...