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High E string slipping on the JTV69

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I received a new JTV 69 2 days ago. I can barely play the high E string without it slipping off the fretboard. I read on the forums about this issue on the early models but didn't know they still existed. The one I got is a 2013 model (unless that's considered early as well). It happens every time I play open D, G type chords chords or any hammer on/pull offs on that string. 

 

Do I send the guitar back? I don't want to change the neck and void the warranty. 

 

Thanks! 

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Even with the supposed fix, the E strings are still very close to the edge of the fretboard. You either have to adjust to it or get a different Variax.

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I received a new JTV 69 2 days ago. I can barely play the high E string without it slipping off the fretboard. I read on the forums about this issue on the early models but didn't know they still existed. The one I got is a 2013 model (unless that's considered early as well). It happens every time I play open D, G type chords chords or any hammer on/pull offs on that string.

 

Do I send the guitar back? I don't want to change the neck and void the warranty.

 

Thanks!

A Warmoth neck (or any other Strat replacement that suits you) will solve all your problems. Forget the warranty...stock neck is a crime against nature anyway, unless you have tiny little fingers.

 

I bought my JTV pretty much knowing that the neck wasn't gonna stay long. I looked at the specs, and I know what I'm comfortable with...the math was simple. Ordered my Warmoth neck a month or so later. I had no intention of suffering through 2 years (Sweetwater warranty) of the absurdly narrow nut width when there was an quick and relatively inexpensive fix available. If the warranty matters that much to you, find the nearest "authorized service center" and have them do the work for you, then there should be no warranty issues.

 

The alternative is to do the return/replace dance...sometimes that dance lasts forever, and requires multiple spins out on the floor. My legs get way too tired for that crap. Plus the next one might show up with a worse problem. Buying ANY guitar sight unseen is always a crap shoot. If all the electronics work as advertised, just keep it and get a different neck. Makes it a much improved instrument. You won't be sorry.

 

If nothing else you'll get a headstock that doesn't look like the hideous love child of a cricket bat and a field hockey stick. :)

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Stock neck is AWESOME IMO (maple fretboard) but yea I can slip

It off really easily if I try.

 

I think it's no biggie to adapt to it, certainly less effort for me than adapting to jumbo frets when I got a guitar with those, or adjusting from my Ibanez neck to my Tele neck but YMMV

 

it definitely is a 'thing' but I LOVE the 69 neck

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I got a B-stock JTV-69S (colour is black with maple fretboard which I like a lot, in addition to my 3-tone sunburst strato) few days a go, have played few hours with it and found no issues like you did, in my normal playing.

 

But I found another minor issue I may need to fix if I decide to keep it (and I will, I think): If I play an open high E or B-string reasonably loud, I hear a rattling sound. To me it seems especially the E is going so straight to tuners that it is not pulled down enough. If I put something between the e- and b-strings or if I push them down slightly with my finger the rattle is gone. Actually if I keep my finger lightly on the string while I play it, I feel the rattle.

 

Perhaps I should get some similar device than exists in stratocasters to pull the two strings down.

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I quess it does. Also, the strings are perhaps a bit high at nut, so that would be fixed at the same time. I'm not sure though if action on a modelling guitar should be high to prevent string buzz, which might cause unwanted results in modelled sounds.

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Hi! i have exactly the same problem, but I've had my 69 a year now and i thought i could get used to it, but i cant, so i am really really disapointed - I'm considering taking the fingerboard from my half defect Variax 300 if I can get it fit together, though I do not like the head as on the 69.

 

I have a question for somebody who owns a jtv69 US model. I have a Korean model and are curious about the distance between the middel of the e-string and to the edge of the 1st fret on a US model is different than mine, which is only 1.25 millimeters (approximately) to where the fret begins to round down... could i get a good-hearted person with a caliper test, to measure the distance on a US model in order to determine whether that's the penalty for buying a Korean model.

 

thank you in advance - I hope my writing is understandable because English is not my language, if not, blame google translate.

 

Have a great sunday Line 6 people - Dan Pedersen

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I don't think the setup for a Variax is much different than for any other electric guitar.  You don't want the action so low that you get lots of fret buzz but it doesn't have to be higher than normal.  I like my string height at the nut as low as possible to make it easier to fret the chords down near the nut.  Most guitars come out of the factory set too high at the nut.  Strangely, my JTV69s was very well set up at the nut and the action was actually a little too low on the LowE and A strings.  I raised the bridge saddles on the Low E and A a bit and that is all it needed.  Most of my other guitars needed nut work when I got them.  Proper shaping of the nut slots is critical.  If it's not right, the open strings won't ring properly.  High E and B are the hardest ones to get right.

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If a replacement neck is set up right, the action shouldn't be a problem, should it?

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If any neck is set up right, action shouldn't be a problem. The problem is - is the neck decent enough to be set up right.....

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If any neck is set up right, action shouldn't be a problem. The problem is - is the neck decent enough to be set up right.....

 

Amen...

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I've read and heard many experienced guitarists like thicker necks. I can't say I'm experienced at all, although I have had a guitar for tens of years, but I feel I can manage the same with any neck. If I played guitar a lot, it might really matter. But I kind of like the JTV-69S neck. It is in the same ballbark with my Gibson LP Studio Joe Bonamassa, but thinner I quess. It feels a bit thicker than the Mex Strato (Custon Shop Designed 69) and is very playable. I also kind of like my Ibanez LP copy from 1976, from the lawsuit era, and it has a thin neck. So ... ?

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If any neck is set up right, action shouldn't be a problem. The problem is - is the neck decent enough to be set up right.....

 

I might need to just get a new neck for my 600. The frets are worn to hell. A Fret job would require shaving off a lot of the frets.

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I might need to just get a new neck for my 600. The frets are worn to hell. A Fret job would require shaving off a lot of the frets.

 

If you like the neck, just get it re-fretted.

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If you like the neck, just get it re-fretted.

 

I do. It was the best neck I've ever played on. I did a lot of "work" on it to try to help kill severe fret level problems, but ultimately, right now, it has low action, but it buzzes, but not enough for it to come through the modeling.

 

Also, priority for that guitar would be to fix the 1/4 jack.

 

My JTV is setup great. I lowered the action a bit when I got it. No buzzing at all.

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I've never been concerned or bothered by neck shapes. If I want a particular guitar I get it and simply adapt to however the neck/fretboard is shaped. Never met a properly set up guitar that could.'t be played. :)

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Have your local Line 6 authorized service center that does guitars have a look at it,

it may just be a set-up or alignment issue.

 

Set-ups are checked at the main distribution point. However climate at a given location

can have an effect on the set-up. Since they don't know where a guitar is going to at that

point, the set-up would be done to the specifications and not the location of the end destination.

 

However, when I do repair or service a guitar, I adjust the set-ups for the end destinations.

Sometimes it's needed that the local tech may need to dial it in that last smidgeon.

 

When a guitar arrives, it's good to play it and give the set-up 2-4 days to acclimate to the

end destination where you're at. Then, if needed, go to a local guitar tech for that last final

smidgeon of adjustment.

 

2013 necks have the most recent current neck specs.

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After short inspection I found the reason for the open high E-string rattle/buzz (mentioned in one of my earlier posts above), the nut slot for the high E-string is too wide (and probably flat bottomed), so the string vibrates in the slot causing the buzzing noise. I bet the same is true also for the B-string which has the same issue but in "smaller scale" (sorry for my English).

 

I can easily notice this also by moving the string sideways with my hand.

 

Haven't checked the strings yet, if they are 10s. I quess they are original factory strings, so perhaps 10s?

 

Could someone check this in your own guitar, if it is a feature or something else. Imo the string height is in the same ballpark with the other strings. I have a 2013-made JTV-69S (black with white alder fretboard).

 

I don't know what to do with the guitar. I hate to pay for fixing that in a new (although Thomann B-stock) guitar. I'm still in the return period. I will contact them but I bet they just want it back to see themselves and to fix it. And it will take a month or so, like with the DT25 presence pot noise.

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Fixing a nut isn't a big deal.  Get it set up by an experienced luthier if you don't know how to do it yourself. 

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Could someone check this in your own guitar, if it is a feature or something else.

 

We could call it a lot of things (some of which would be more polite than others), but a "feature" it's NOT. "Defect" is more like it. Strings are never supposed to rattle around in the nut slot.

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Well, actually more or less all strings are loose in the nut slot, also G and D (looked with a loupe). Looks like the slots for the higher strings are roughly the same width, so the thinnest strings with weakest pull down suffer most of this rattle.

 

I quess/remember the nut in JTVs is some sort of graphite (or such) version for easier string movement, with less friction, so perhaps the slots are supposed to be a bit wider than normal?

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Graphtech nut.  Maybe you have the wrong strings on there.  Mine came with 10's and they fit nicely in the nut.  I use 10's and I have not experienced any nut problems. (sounds painful)

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Anyone else willing to actually check the nut slot width and confirm if the high E string moves sideways when moved with fingers? Thanks! I think 69 and 69S would do, either one.

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Anyone else willing to actually check the nut slot width and confirm if the high E string moves sideways when moved with fingers? Thanks! I think 69 and 69S would do, either one.

 

Trust me, there's nothing for anyone to check...as fancy as the JTV's are, Line 6 did not "re-invent" the nut. No guitar on earth is supposed to do that.

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I trust you, but "you never know"... :-) I'd just be interested to know if the nut slots in other similar guitars are completely different or almost the same (but they just happen to work). It is not that usual to play the high E-string open and hit it hard, without other strings ringing and masking the rattle inaudible. So I think it is possible some just won't notice this.

 

I'm sure I can manage fixing it myself, actually my friend has nut slot files. Just trying to find out if contacting the seller (company in another country) is waste of time, or if they could provide me with real improvement, like a new (different) nut or such.

 

Thanks anyway!

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I trust you, but "you never know"... :-) I'd just be interested to know if the nut slots in other similar guitars are completely different or almost the same (but they just happen to work). It is not that usual to play the high E-string open and hit it hard, without other strings ringing and masking the rattle inaudible. So I think it is possible some just won't notice this.

 

I'm sure I can manage fixing it myself, actually my friend has nut slot files. Just trying to find out if contacting the seller (company in another country) is waste of time, or if they could provide me with real improvement, like a new (different) nut or such.

 

Thanks anyway!

Ok...but I'm not sure what having that information is gonna do for you. Either way, it's a problem that needs fixing. Good luck with it.

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Measured 0.24mm, divided by 25.4 mm results as 0.00984 inches so I'd say 10s. The first three nut slots are 0.52mm (0.020 inches), 0.56mm and 0.62mm wide measured near the top. The slot gets a bit narrower towards the bottom, my quess is to about 0.16 inches. So there is a 1.5x slot compared to the string width. My bet is that has come from the factory, since the slot looks pretty clean if I look at it with a 10x loupe.

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Measured 0.24mm, divided by 25.4 mm results as 0.00984 inches so I'd say 10s. The first three nut slots are 0.52mm (0.020 inches), 0.56mm and 0.62mm wide measured near the top. The slot gets a bit narrower towards the bottom, my quess is to about 0.16 inches. So there is a 1.5x slot compared to the string width. My bet is that has come from the factory, since the slot looks pretty clean if I look at it with a 10x loupe.

 

I sympathize with your problem...the nut should have been cut properly from the get-go, but the amount of mental gymnastics you're putting yourself through is making ME dizzy ;), and no amount of caliper juggling will change your options...it's a new nut, new neck, or new guitar.

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Sort of agree, but this is me, sorry :-). The three alternatives you gave are quite different. I'm trying to avoid sending the guitar back to the seller, since it would take few weeks or more, if possible. But since I promised to deliver the seller some info, I'll show also you "the evidence". See the attached MP3 and few photos. To me the tuner heights seem quite normal as they get shorter towards the lighter strings.

 

I know I should make a service ticket to get official Line6 feedback on the subject, but if someone from Line6 sees this, I'd be glad to hear their opinion.

JTV69S_EString_Buzz.mp3

post-511754-0-70292900-1431038474_thumb.jpg

post-511754-0-35663300-1431038484_thumb.jpg

post-511754-0-29186200-1431038496_thumb.jpg

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The critical thing with nut setup is that the break away (last string contact point) should be right at the front of the nut (towards first fret).  I do not see anything obviously wrong in your pix because I can't see where the string last contacts the nut going towards the first fret.  The slot has to be wide enough to not restrict the string movement when tuning / bending.  The bottom should be rounded to the diameter of the string.  If the string is vibrating in the slot, then the last point of contact is too far back in the nut.

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As you see, the string travels quite straight over the nut, so the downwards force must be (and is) quite small. That combined with quite flat bottom of the nut slot lets it vibrate easily, I believe, letting it generate the buzz.

 

edit: Or it could be what you said. As you may see, the front of the E-string nut slot has kind of polished. Don't know if that's because of vibration or just because of normal wear. Perhaps using file to slightly lower the rear portion of the slot would help.

 

Perhaps few touches with a fret file would be all that's needed. But I would hate to pay another 50€ extra to get that fixed (including all strings), as much I would hate to send the guitar back. Let's see.

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Filing the nut takes a bit of technique but it should not be that expensive to have it done right.  You need the proper nut files.  I have a set for 10's that I use to adjust nut height.  I have screwed up a few nuts learning how to get it right.  I like to adjust my string height at the nut as low as possible to make the guitar easier to fret on the first and second fret.  It's easy to go too low.  A good setup is worth the cost though.

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vpera,

 

Sounds like a combination of a slight fret buzz and looks like a few burrs

in the nut slots. Recommend getting the nut slots de-burred and the set-up

checked and dialed-in just a little.

 

Also recommend a Line 6 authorized person in your area with JTV experience.

Yes, logging a ticket would be good.

 

Reminders- register the product, log a ticket, use a Line 6 authorized service center.

Things go so much more smoothly and efficient that way for you.

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Thanks psarkissian.

I don't believe in fret buzz because the buzz disappears if I slightly press the string, behind the nut. Didn't record that, though. But you could be right otherwise.

Just wondering if they would fix this in local service in country where I live, in the same area. I think last time I sent the DT25 to service in Germany, perhaps because it was after all easier that way (as I recall the service was in an other town and I should have paid the postage, but sending it back to Germany was free for me). Well, i'll need to check that. And register the product...

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Perhaps few touches with a fret file would be all that's needed. But I would hate to pay another 50€ extra to get that fixed (including all strings), as much I would hate to send the guitar back. Let's see.

Seriously, what's there to see? You still have the same three options: Fix or replace the nut (attempting it yourself, paying someone to do it, or sending it in for warranty work), replace the neck, or exchange the guitar. No other options will be forthcoming no matter how many measurements and pictures you take. It either plays correctly, or it doesn't.

 

If you don't want to send the guitar back, and you don't want to pay for a set-up to have the nut fixed or replaced, then that leaves a warranty job. In all likelihood, that will take longer than exchanging it for a new one, and may or may not yield better results than paying a decent luthier to do the work (which should not be terribly expensive). In my experience, "authorized service centers" are a crap shoot, at best.

 

There's still replacing the neck...but that's certainly gonna run you more than the cost of a set up.

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The thing with fret buzz is that it can occur in different places on the neck, 

depending on how the neck relief is set. Eliminating fret buzz is a balance

between neck relief and string action height.

 

Pick-up to string distance can also play a role when the Models are engaged,

though that doesn't seem to be the case here.

 

More than likely in your case, it is burrs in the nut slots. If de-burring the nut

slots doesn't help, then maybe it may need a new nut. A Line 6 authorized

service center would be able to get one, or online through Full Compass

(search: jtv-69 nut) on their website.

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Read the thread about guitar set-up that I posted.......and get a free magazine while yer at it.

There are no secrets to a good set-up.

It's just like any other guitar out there......no voodoo involved just because it's a JTV.

 

                                                          Kylling It

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Read the thread about guitar set-up that I posted.......and get a free magazine while yer at it.

There are no secrets to a good set-up.

It's just like any other guitar out there......no voodoo involved just because it's a JTV.

 

                                                          Kylling It

 

SSHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!  Don't say that out loud...Men In Black from an "authorized service center" will whisk you away for "re-education". ;)

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