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Can my luthier repair my JTV69?

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I go to a great repair guy (luthier) that I trust with all of my guitars. The problem is: he is not at all familiar with Variax guitars and I am having issues. My JTV69 Variax guitar’s volume knob is cutting in and out on the analog pickups only—the digital modeling appears to be working fine. If I tap firmly (and repeatedly) on the volume knob it seems to fix the problem, temporarily. The volume fluctuates from less than 50% to full-on, indicating it might be a bad connection. Do you guys think this is something a common luthier can fix? Or do I need to go to an authorized Line 6 repair shop? I appreciate your feedback :)

 

Rich

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The local powers that be will be here shortly to tell you that only an officially anointed "authorized service center" is capable of fixing the problem. If all you  need is a new volume pot, or if its just a loose solder joint somewhere, I would think it should be relatively straightforward fix. If there are other hardware issues, you may have no choice but to find a L6 repair joint to do it. Good luck.

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Is it still under warrantee?  If so, I would go through Line6 Channels to get it fixed.  If not, you can decide if you want someone else to work on it.

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Haven't looked in the guts of my new 69, but as long as, hopefully, Line 6 doesn't have the pots all soldered onto some circuit board, replacing a pot theoretically is easy enough to do for someone who's worked on their own guitar electrics before.

 

Otherwise best bet is to see if there's an authorized service (with a good rep of course) and have them deal with it when its under warranty.

 

I just had a bad volume pot replaced on another brand guitar that's brand new too by a luthier near me who happened to be an authorized repair.  "F" hole hollowbody.... I did not want to deal with that myself since its warranty, lol

 

Personally I have big concerns about computerized guitars needing to be warrantied for many years longer than standard warranties.

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The volume and tone pots are a little more complicated on a JTV because the computer has to read them and they also affect the mags. (not sure if they are dual pots or not but they may be)

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Thanks for the feedback everyone!

 

The volume and tone pots are a little more complicated on a JTV because the computer has to read them and they also affect the mags. (not sure if they are dual pots or not but they may be)

 

This is exactly my concern: if the volume and tone pots are more complicated, and my luthier doesn't really understand how to interact with them, I may end up causing more damage. Does Line 6 provide schematics or a repair manual for basic upgrades/fixes? For example, how are people managing to upgrade pickups? 

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I have seen several posts for upgrading pickups and there is a connection diagram for the pickups posted.  I have never seen any kind of schematic posted.  I have not looked at the pots.  It's easy enough to do that but I have not.  Some repair parts are available from Full Compas?  Not sure about the pots but you could check.  I doubt that replacing one is very hard if you have an exact replacement. (Pretty darn easy)

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You should never give a Variax to a regular guitar luthier. The only thing someone like that should do is a setup, but nothing dealing with the electronics. You need to send it to an approved place that knows how to do that, or you will junk your guitar.

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I go to a great repair guy (luthier) that I trust with all of my guitars. The problem is: he is not at all familiar with Variax guitars and I am having issues. My JTV69 Variax guitar’s volume knob is cutting in and out on the analog pickups only—the digital modeling appears to be working fine. If I tap firmly (and repeatedly) on the volume knob it seems to fix the problem, temporarily. The volume fluctuates from less than 50% to full-on, indicating it might be a bad connection. Do you guys think this is something a common luthier can fix? Or do I need to go to an authorized Line 6 repair shop? I appreciate your feedback :)

 

Rich

I bought a second hand Variax a month ago and it had a similar issue with the volume and tone knob. I opend it up and found that the cables of the knobs where wobbly - they were only put in without solder. I don't know if this the case with all variax. I decided to solder them on and the problem was solved. No drop outs or noise issue since then.

 

This is not hard to do. If your luthier has done electronics on other guitars it shouldn't be a problem for him to do (if it's the same issue).

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You should never give a Variax to a regular guitar luthier. The only thing someone like that should do is a setup, but nothing dealing with the electronics. You need to send it to an approved place that knows how to do that, or you will junk your guitar.

 

I don't know the OP's situation, but there are plenty of folks for whom a trip to an "authorized service center" is not feasible, and it's not exactly fair to make a blanket assumption about the skills of every luthier in the world who hasn't sat through an official L6 laying-on-of-hands ceremony.

 

He may have a very simple problem...If it's just a loose solder joint, it's highly unlikely that the guitar will end up "junked". And while I wouldn't give the instrument to any of the residents of the baboon habitat at the Bronx Zoo to work on, for someone who knows their way around a soldering iron and volume pots, I'd say the risk is minimal.

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I go to a great repair guy (luthier) that I trust with all of my guitars. The problem is: he is not at all familiar with Variax guitars and I am having issues. My JTV69 Variax guitar’s volume knob is cutting in and out on the analog pickups only—the digital modeling appears to be working fine. If I tap firmly (and repeatedly) on the volume knob it seems to fix the problem, temporarily. The volume fluctuates from less than 50% to full-on, indicating it might be a bad connection. Do you guys think this is something a common luthier can fix? Or do I need to go to an authorized Line 6 repair shop? I appreciate your feedback :)

 

Rich

Sounds similar to the issue I've been having:  http://line6.com/support/topic/13319-volume-drops/

 

Thanks for starting this post, some of the responses have given me some ideas to look at...

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I don't know the OP's situation, but there are plenty of folks for whom a trip to an "authorized service center" is not feasible, and it's not exactly fair to make a blanket assumption about the skills of every luthier in the world who hasn't sat through an official L6 laying-on-of-hands ceremony.

 

He may have a very simple problem...If it's just a loose solder joint, it's highly unlikely that the guitar will end up "junked". And while I wouldn't give the instrument to any of the residents of the baboon habitat at the Bronx Zoo to work on, for someone who knows their way around a soldering iron and volume pots, I'd say the risk is minimal.

 

 

A luthier might be able to fix some things, but sometimes with a beast like this, it could cause further damage to assume you know what you're doing with it just because it's LIKE a regular guitar in some aspects.

 

I junked the 1/4 jack on my 600 by replacing the pots. A luthier would probably have a way better job at fixing it than I did, but that doesn't mean he's qualified for any of the Variax parts.

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A luthier might be able to fix some things, but sometimes with a beast like this, it could cause further damage to assume you know what you're doing with it just because it's LIKE a regular guitar in some aspects.

 

I junked the 1/4 jack on my 600 by replacing the pots. A luthier would probably have a way better job at fixing it than I did, but that doesn't mean he's qualified for any of the Variax parts.

 

I surrender...If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

 

I've seen the light! Pay heed, my 6-string comrades, for there are but a tiny handful of humans capable of tackling the awesome technological behemoth that is the Variax...the most unfathomable device created since the Manhattan Project.

 

Listen not to tales of replaced piezos, saddles swapped for ones from Graphtech, or entire transplants into Lesser Instruments....for these are but the deceptive and empty works of The Desolate One, meant to lead us astray. For the righteous, all roads lead to an "authorized service center" and the wisdom that lay therein, and only therein. Follow other paths at risk to your mortal soul...or an input jack, whichever is cheaper.

 

Play on...(cue Twilight Zone theme)

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To reiterate, the pots on the JTVs are non-standard pots. So, that leaves you with three options in order of expense:

1) Open it up yourself/your local electronics guy and see if cleaning/loose wires is the problem.

2) Try to get a replacement part from Line 6 or a distributor and have that fitted by your local electronics guy.

3) Authorised service center.

 

It looks like these may be the parts you need:

http://www.fullcompass.com/product/450983.html

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Many thanks for all of the great feedback; all of your ideas gave me something to work with. Incidentally, I (somehow) forgot that this issue was previously repaired under warranty 1 and 1/2 years ago. I am asking Line 6 to consider covering this, since a warranty repair should not be failing. That said, based on past experiences, I am nervous about their ability to successfully fix this guitar. As odd or ironic as it sounds, I wonder if I might have better luck with my luthier, giving him the notes and documents shared here. What a mess!

 

Again, I appreciate the input from everyone--it was more than I expected :)

 

Rich 

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 As odd or ironic as it sounds, I wonder if I might have better luck with my luthier, giving him the notes and documents shared here. What a mess!

 

Blasphemer!!!! ;)

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I've packed up my 59, 69S, and my 73 Tele Deluxe and 66 Gretsch Country Gent -- going to my luthier this afternoon. He's well respected in this area, and is only in town a few times a year to visit his folks, but does some work while he's here. Us locals get wind of it and book him up. Very nice guy, and he's worked on Variaxes before.... Hope lightning doesn't strike me. :huh: Ain't no magic to it, just need good skills and experience to do the physical work on the guitar. He's got 'em. Would I have him work on the processor end of the JTV's? -- no probably not, but other than that -- no qualms.

 

My 59 is from 2011 (actually 2010 -- didn't get it for over 6 mo's after I ordered it) and my 69S is from 2012, so not worried about warranties anymore... I switched out my 69S PU's myself within 3 or 4 months to noiseless --- they work great, and I was not struck with lightning then...

 

My "nearest" L6 warranty workshop is from 3 to 6 hours away -- Chicago, IL; Madison, WI; or St. Louis, MO, so it's not practical for "non-Variax" electronics work to send away. BTW, some of those "warranty" workshops clearly state they only work on them if you bought them there -- which, I believe, doesn't really mesh with the idea of a mfr-blessed warranty repair shop... I'm just sayin'....

 

With my 59, I had the 3-way switch glitch -- they had fixed and refit the 59's (which is why I and many others had the BIG WAIT with the first bunch). Unfortunately, their rush to get those done resulted in some bad soldering -- think mine was the first to come to their attention. I sent it back to them in California on their nickel, and they fixed it -- it's been fine ever since, but the hassle to box it up in the orig packing and go through the agony of waiting for the shipper to come get it -- not something I'd do lightly again... If Line 6 had a better-located set of authorized service centers -- not just in major metro's -- then I'd probably make more use of them.

 

My 2 cents on the topic....

 

Dave

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Still having problems try to use the "quote" function -- dunno what I'm doing wrong, but anyway... I'm just going to copy it the hard way...

 

From ozbadman:

It looks like these may be the parts you need:

http://www.fullcompa...uct/450983.html

 

Good catch OZ -- I was looking earlier, didn't find that one -- I might just pick that one up just to have on hand.... I ordered a pearloid pickguard for my 69S from there about 10 days ago -- still hasn't shipped. Not surprised, though. The last time I got some parts from full compass, it seemed to take forever for them to finally ship. If you need something in a hurry.... be prepared to hurry up and wait....

 

Dave

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I would rather trust them to a known good luthier - especially if I could avoid shipping them.  More likely to come back in better condition then they went out in.  I am sorry but most of a JTV setup is not magic.  I have maintained my 500 myself for a decade and it's better than when I received it.

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I ordered a pearloid pickguard for my 69S from there about 10 days ago -- still hasn't shipped. Not surprised, though. The last time I got some parts from full compass, it seemed to take forever for them to finally ship. If you need something in a hurry.... be prepared to hurry up and wait....

 

Dave

Yeah, my pickguard took a while too. They said it would be 10-14 business days before it would ship...why I don't know. Some places take forever.

 

Sweetwater seems to know what you're gonna order before you do, and it's out the door same day most of the time. Ordered a 7 string from them yesterday afternoon. Got the tracking number a few hours later...it'll be here tomorrow.

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I surrender...If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

 

I've seen the light! Pay heed, my 6-string comrades, for there are but a tiny handful of humans capable of tackling the awesome technological behemoth that is the Variax...the most unfathomable device created since the Manhattan Project.

 

Listen not to tales of replaced piezos, saddles swapped for ones from Graphtech, or entire transplants into Lesser Instruments....for these are but the deceptive and empty works of The Desolate One, meant to lead us astray. For the righteous, all roads lead to an "authorized service center" and the wisdom that lay therein, and only therein. Follow other paths at risk to your mortal soul...or an input jack, whichever is cheaper.

 

Play on...(cue Twilight Zone theme)

 

You realize I'm talking about repairing the computer components, and not obvious crap like Variax gut transplants and hardware transplants?

 

Besides, you realize these things that some people do like Variax transplants and bridge swaps were experimentations that were perfected? 

 

Handing a Variax to any luthier and asking them to fix something just because the Variax is a guitar is moronic.

 

Not even an electronics guy is going to know exactly what to do with the guitar just because it's electronic.

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You realize I'm talking about repairing the computer components, and not obvious crap like Variax gut transplants and hardware transplants?

 

Besides, you realize these things that some people do like Variax transplants and bridge swaps were experimentations that were perfected?

 

Handing a Variax to any luthier and asking them to fix something just because the Variax is a guitar is moronic.

 

Not even an electronics guy is going to know exactly what to do with the guitar just because it's electronic.

 

What's moronic is assuming that no one but an "authorized" person can fix a JTV. There's no Variax PhD program. When a part fails, it's gonna be swapped out. Entire boards will come and go. Solder it in where the old one was. You think they're gonna replace individual transistors, resistors, and diodes?

 

There ARE people capable...you might even be one of them. There's nothing mystical about it. If you want to go on perpetuating the notion that the "authorized" folks have some magical skills set that mere mortals do not...go ahead, enjoy. I'm not gonna debate it endlessly. If you need to be right, fine you're right.

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I surrender...If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

 

I've seen the light! Pay heed, my 6-string comrades, for there are but a tiny handful of humans capable of tackling the awesome technological behemoth that is the Variax...the most unfathomable device created since the Manhattan Project.

 

Listen not to tales of replaced piezos, saddles swapped for ones from Graphtech, or entire transplants into Lesser Instruments....for these are but the deceptive and empty works of The Desolate One, meant to lead us astray. For the righteous, all roads lead to an "authorized service center" and the wisdom that lay therein, and only therein. Follow other paths at risk to your mortal soul...or an input jack, whichever is cheaper.

 

Play on...(cue Twilight Zone theme)

By far your best comment yet.

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What's moronic is assuming that no one but an "authorized" person can fix a JTV. There's no Variax PhD program. When a part fails, it's gonna be swapped out. Entire boards will come and go. Solder it in where the old one was. You think they're gonna replace individual transistors, resistors, and diodes?

 

There ARE people capable...you might even be one of them. There's nothing mystical about it. If you want to go on perpetuating the notion that the "authorized" folks have some magical skills set that mere mortals do not...go ahead, enjoy. I'm not gonna debate it endlessly. If you need to be right, fine you're right.

 

Jesus Christ, you realize I'm talking about giving the guitar to any luthier in general?

You see the topic title: "Can MY luthier..."

 

You really think a random luthier can fix the guitar without the big risk of damaging it even further? 

 

It IS moronic.

 

You should only get the guitar repaired by someone who knows what they're doing. I'm not saying there's not people outside of the service center that knows information about the Variax guitar, but you have to understand, that it requires a lot more than just knowing how to take things apart.

 

I bought a Variax guts case, and guess what, it doesn't work, because it wasn't flashed with any memories, so I had to send it back. Gee, you know who can possibly fix that problem other than someone who has access to Line 6 technology to do a raw flash on the Variax? Not a luthier.

So even if they can order parts offline, when the fact is those parts are meant for authorized centers to buy them from, and not regular Variax users, it doesn't mean you can fix it yourself.

 

I mean, what are they going to do then, buy another JTV and take parts from that? Isn't that retarded? You might as well send it into a service center or just buy a new Variax at that point.

 

Just because a guy knows how to build a consumer PC doesn't mean you can send the guy working on a super computer just because it's a freaking computer.

 

You're telling the guy, "Oh, pfft a luthier can figure it out!!! It's not that complicated!" when he specifically stated, THE LUTHIER DOES NOT KNOW ABOUT VARIAX GUITARS. You're basically telling him to break his guitar further. Incredibly ignorant.

 

Ridiculous.

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Jesus Christ, you realize I'm talking about giving the guitar to any luthier in general?

You see the topic title: "Can MY luthier..."

 

You really think a random luthier can fix the guitar without the big risk of damaging it even further? 

 

It IS moronic.

 

You should only get the guitar repaired by someone who knows what they're doing. I'm not saying there's not people outside of the service center that knows information about the Variax guitar, but you have to understand, that it requires a lot more than just knowing how to take things apart.

 

I bought a Variax guts case, and guess what, it doesn't work, because it wasn't flashed with any memories, so I had to send it back. Gee, you know who can possibly fix that problem other than someone who has access to Line 6 technology to do a raw flash on the Variax? Not a luthier.

So even if they can order parts offline, when the fact is those parts are meant for authorized centers to buy them from, and not regular Variax users, it doesn't mean you can fix it yourself.

 

I mean, what are they going to do then, buy another JTV and take parts from that? Isn't that retarded? You might as well send it into a service center or just buy a new Variax at that point.

 

Just because a guy knows how to build a consumer PC doesn't mean you can send the guy working on a super computer just because it's a freaking computer.

 

You're telling the guy, "Oh, pfft a luthier can figure it out!!! It's not that complicated!" when he specifically stated, THE LUTHIER DOES NOT KNOW ABOUT VARIAX GUITARS. You're basically telling him to break his guitar further. Incredibly ignorant.

 

Ridiculous.

 

The only thing missing is from this is a long, self-satisfied sniff at the end...we really need sound fx. Feel better?

"Moronic, ridiculous...hurumph. I win."

 

I shall debate you no more. Take a victory lap.

 

Have a nice day.

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Calling him a Luthier means that he should be trained to do guitar setups.  There are good and bad luthiers just like every other field of expertise.  Good ones get a good reputation in the area and I would trust them to work on my JTV if it wasn't an electronics issue.  Sending it to a Line6 service center is just as much a crap shoot as taking it to an unknown luthier IMO.  I am sure that there are some very good techs at some of them and I bet that some have no clue what they are doing.

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Calling him a Luthier means that he should be trained to do guitar setups.  There are good and bad luthiers just like every other field of expertise.  Good ones get a good reputation in the area and I would trust them to work on my JTV if it wasn't an electronics issue.  Sending it to a Line6 service center is just as much a crap shoot as taking it to an unknown luthier IMO.  I am sure that there are some very good techs at some of them and I bet that some have no clue what they are doing.

 

Exactly. A luthier can do guitar work on the Variax, but he can't fix the electronics. 

 

The OP stated the luthier doesn't know what to do with the electronic problems, so telling the OP to "Yeah, make the luthier do it" is insanely ignorant.

 

If someone really wants to fix the guitar, then do it proper, don't damage it even further by telling a guy to do something he doesn't know what to do with. Does it really matter if you want it to make sound if you damage it to the point where it'll never make sound again?

 

There is a chance that a luthier can replace something like a tone pot or volume pot, but even then, he'd need information on what to do. You're asking someone to take guesses if you tell them to work on something they're not sure about.

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 I switched out my 69S PU's myself within 3 or 4 months to noiseless --- they work great, and I was not struck with lightning then...

 

My "nearest" L6 warranty workshop is from 3 to 6 hours away -- Chicago, IL; Madison, WI; or St. Louis, MO, so it's not practical for "non-Variax" electronics work to send away. BTW, some of those "warranty" workshops clearly state they only work on them if you bought them there -- which, I believe, doesn't really mesh with the idea of a mfr-blessed warranty repair shop... I'm just sayin'....

 

With my 59, I had the 3-way switch glitch -- they had fixed and refit the 59's (which is why I and many others had the BIG WAIT with the first bunch). Unfortunately, their rush to get those done resulted in some bad soldering -- think mine was the first to come to their attention. I sent it back to them in California on their nickel, and they fixed it -- it's been fine ever since, but the hassle to box it up in the orig packing and go through the agony of waiting for the shipper to come get it -- not something I'd do lightly again... If Line 6 had a better-located set of authorized service centers -- not just in major metro's -- then I'd probably make more use of them.

 

My 2 cents on the topic....

 

Dave

 

Well, look at that...I guess it's possible for someone without an official licensed blessing to touch the electronics after all.

 

Was it scary? No earthquakes, or booming voices from the sky warning you not to do it again? :P

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I think it's actually easier to change pickups on a JTV (not active maybe) since they just solder to nice points on a board.  Anyone who has changed pickups on a Strat could handle it with ease and minimal risk.

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I think it's actually easier to change pickups on a JTV (not active maybe) since they just solder to nice points on a board.  Anyone who has changed pickups on a Strat could handle it with ease and minimal risk.

 

Yes, I would imagine so...but then again, what do I know? I spend all day encouraging people to break their guitars in fits of uncontrolled ignorance.

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I think it's actually easier to change pickups on a JTV (not active maybe) since they just solder to nice points on a board.  Anyone who has changed pickups on a Strat could handle it with ease and minimal risk.

It was easier on a Berdux (strat style) to change the PU than my 69s... But it was easier to solder my 69s than the graphteck on my 700... Which was easier than change to dimarzio push pull at my flying V...lol

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I surrender...If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

 

I've seen the light! Pay heed, my 6-string comrades, for there are but a tiny handful of humans capable of tackling the awesome technological behemoth that is the Variax...the most unfathomable device created since the Manhattan Project.

 

Listen not to tales of replaced piezos, saddles swapped for ones from Graphtech, or entire transplants into Lesser Instruments....for these are but the deceptive and empty works of The Desolate One, meant to lead us astray. For the righteous, all roads lead to an "authorized service center" and the wisdom that lay therein, and only therein. Follow other paths at risk to your mortal soul...or an input jack, whichever is cheaper.

 

Play on...(cue Twilight Zone theme)

 

 I have to tell 'ya .....This IS the best and most creative reply to date. You''ve got some talent going to waste here on these guys.

 

I'm becoming a fan.......always loved great satire.                         Keep on keeping on,

 

                                                                                                           Shawn

 

the desolate one  :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :P :P :P ;)

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 I have to tell 'ya .....This IS the best and most creative reply to date. You''ve got some talent going to waste here on these guys.

 

I'm becoming a fan.......always loved great satire.                         Keep on keeping on,

 

                                                                                                           Shawn

 

the desolate one  :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :P :P :P ;)

 

I try... ;)

 

Remember folks. the 9:30 show is completely different from the 7:30 show...don't forget to tip your waitresses. :P

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Well, look at that...I guess it's possible for someone without an official licensed blessing to touch the electronics after all.

 

Was it scary? No earthquakes, or booming voices from the sky warning you not to do it again? :P

 

You're strawmanning here again. I said UNFAMILIAR ELECTRONICS. The guts, or anything else that isn't on a conventional guitar that is trivial to mess with.

 

And again, his luthier ADMITTED he wasn't sure. "Pfft let your luthier do it" after that statement is telling him "Let the guy do something he doesn't know and hope it gets fixed, even though there's a strong possibility your guitar will become junk because again, he doesn't know what he's doing!"

 

Unless there is good information you can get about fixing a certain part of the guitar that is unconventional to a normal guitar, then don't mess with it and let a professional handle it.

 

Do you not understand what I'm talking about?

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If the insides of these JTV's are anything like my Godin xtSA, there are various circuit  boards so I'd suspect many line 6 authorized shops.... like the couple in my area.... just deal in electronics servicing and wouldn't know a fret from a bridge saddle (like the one I called to ask).

 

Basically they'll hook up test equipment, find the faulty board and replace the whole thing. The weird thing about these computerized guitars is that either you may be going to need guitar work, which is the domain of the typical luthier/guitar tech, or sophisticated electronics servicing where those kind of shops have nothing to do with guitars in and of themselves.

 

You may be lucky to be near an authorized service that does both. However I'm not sure how many luthiers use anything more than a multimeter for typical simple guitar wiring situations in their line of work or conversely, how many electronics service shops that are going to be bothered to be also in the guitar luthier side of things.

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 so I'd suspect many line 6 authorized shops.... like the couple in my area.... just deal in electronics servicing and wouldn't know a fret from a bridge saddle (like the one I called to ask).

 

 

 

You may be lucky to be near an authorized service that does both. However I'm not sure how many luthiers use anything more than a multimeter for typical simple guitar wiring situations in their line of work or conversely, how many electronics service shops that are going to be bothered to be also in the guitar luthier side of things.

 

 Well, it sounds like the answer to that is.................one............it's in Calabassas, Ca.

 

This is a great post with some insight to offer...........Thanks !

Can you imagine what folks in foreign countries have to go through to get things repaired?

 

Hello...?.....Yes, this is Me&Eds repair center.........How may I not help you today?..........Hello...?Hello...?

 

                                                                Shawn

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I try... ;)

 

Remember folks. the 9:30 show is completely different from the 7:30 show...don't forget to tip your waitresses. :P

 

I'll bet that you sleep with 'yer eyes open..........huh?    :rolleyes:

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You're strawmanning here again. I said UNFAMILIAR ELECTRONICS. The guts, or anything else that isn't on a conventional guitar that is trivial to mess with.

 

And again, his luthier ADMITTED he wasn't sure. "Pfft let your luthier do it" after that statement is telling him "Let the guy do something he doesn't know and hope it gets fixed, even though there's a strong possibility your guitar will become junk because again, he doesn't know what he's doing!"

 

Unless there is good information you can get about fixing a certain part of the guitar that is unconventional to a normal guitar, then don't mess with it and let a professional handle it.

 

Do you not understand what I'm talking about?

 

Sorry clay-man, but I can't agree with you here.

 

I'm an electronics guy and I am always working on things I have never seen before. A lot of them are fixable, some are not. But I know my limitations, and I know when to say "you need to send this back to the manufacturer".

 

Any decent luthier should be capable of doing normal guitar electronics, including complete wiring of pickups, switches, and controls.

 

Now, the Variax is a different beast, but the local "authorised service center" is simply going to do board level replacements as well, not component level replacements. The one advantage I see with an "authorised service center" is that the work will probably be guaranteed. At a board level, the Variax is no more complicated than a standard guitar. The parts are hard to get, but not hard to solder, and no one, not even Line 6 head-office, is replacing components on boards. Not worth the time and effort. Just bin it, and put in the new board.

 

In this particular instance, the OP just has a faulty pot. Dead simple to replace. The problem is that Variax pots are non-standard. But, the part is available, and also dead simple to replace. Sure, in an ideal world these would go back to a local authorised service center, at not too high a cost, but for some people, that is simply not practical and as I say, if you have a decent local luthier, they really can't make the situation worse, and often will make it better.

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Sorry clay-man, but I can't agree with you here.

 

I'm an electronics guy and I am always working on things I have never seen before. A lot of them are fixable, some are not. But I know my limitations, and I know when to say "you need to send this back to the manufacturer".

 

Any decent luthier should be capable of doing normal guitar electronics, including complete wiring of pickups, switches, and controls.

 

Now, the Variax is a different beast, but the local "authorised service center" is simply going to do board level replacements as well, not component level replacements. The one advantage I see with an "authorised service center" is that the work will probably be guaranteed. At a board level, the Variax is no more complicated than a standard guitar. The parts are hard to get, but not hard to solder, and no one, not even Line 6 head-office, is replacing components on boards. Not worth the time and effort. Just bin it, and put in the new board.

 

In this particular instance, the OP just has a faulty pot. Dead simple to replace. The problem is that Variax pots are non-standard. But, the part is available, and also dead simple to replace. Sure, in an ideal world these would go back to a local authorised service center, at not too high a cost, but for some people, that is simply not practical and as I say, if you have a decent local luthier, they really can't make the situation worse, and often will make it better.

 

Hallelujah, a voice of reason...

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Sorry clay-man, but I can't agree with you here.

 

I'm an electronics guy and I am always working on things I have never seen before. A lot of them are fixable, some are not. But I know my limitations, and I know when to say "you need to send this back to the manufacturer".

 

Any decent luthier should be capable of doing normal guitar electronics, including complete wiring of pickups, switches, and controls.

 

Now, the Variax is a different beast, but the local "authorised service center" is simply going to do board level replacements as well, not component level replacements. The one advantage I see with an "authorised service center" is that the work will probably be guaranteed. At a board level, the Variax is no more complicated than a standard guitar. The parts are hard to get, but not hard to solder, and no one, not even Line 6 head-office, is replacing components on boards. Not worth the time and effort. Just bin it, and put in the new board.

 

In this particular instance, the OP just has a faulty pot. Dead simple to replace. The problem is that Variax pots are non-standard. But, the part is available, and also dead simple to replace. Sure, in an ideal world these would go back to a local authorised service center, at not too high a cost, but for some people, that is simply not practical and as I say, if you have a decent local luthier, they really can't make the situation worse, and often will make it better.

 

I can understand that, but again, I tried replacing my board in my 600 and it did absolutely nothing, because it needs flashed, and I'm not talking about using the interface to flash it, I mean like a flash using some type of writing device that only Line 6 would have.

 

The problem is, how do you know that the components you order online are ready to go in a guitar, and not just components fresh off the line that's ready for someone to put in with the proper equipment?

 

A pot is understandable, and should be an easy solder job, but if the guy (luthier) says he doesn't know, he doesn't know.

You can show him the part online, and tell him to have at it, and he can maybe fix it since it's something simple like a 6 prong solder point, or maybe a component you can plug in.

 

My point is, I've personally tried to just "buy an electronic piece and swap it myself", and it didn't work. I did nothing wrong, everything was assembled as it should be. No sound, no recognition from monkey, so I sent the piece back to fullcompass.

 

That's my point.

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