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Punkyboy

The best gauge For a variax Standard

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hello

I buy , but need to wait end this month my Variax Standard

 

but, what kind of string gauge are the best on it ?

42-9

46-9

46-10

??

 

Wich gauge are mounted on it on delivery?

 

 

thanks

 

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The stock strings are D'Addario .10-.46  (D'Addario EXL110BT).

 

This is the same set that the JTV guitars come with.  I've just stuck with them on my JTV69.

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I prefer .09's and I like Elixir brand. i've used them on my JTV-69 and I think they sound fine.

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I read an interesting post a while back about this that would apply to all models of Variax. If you are interested in the acoustic guitar models, small gauge strings will cause some trouble for the obvious reason that acoustic guitars typically use .12 or larger strings. I think that logic probably has some application across all of the models. I use the Vairax a lot of the time for hollow body guitar models, because I don't own any of those in the real world. So, I experimented with a compromise of .11's on string one through either .46 or .48 on string six. I don't actually know whether hollow body players generally prefer larger strings, it was more of a whim. But I really like how they sound for the hollow body models, and I don't notice any problems using them with the solid body models. For the acoustic models, they are still a bit to bright, or maybe "live" is the better adjective, but I think there was a very slight improvement over the stock .10's.

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I use Dean Markley Signature Series JZ strings, which are .12 to .54

 

They're pretty thick strings, but that's how I'm used to playing, and it gives me more of an authentic sound for playing 90s alternative rock, which is mostly what I'm playing these days.

 

For a player who is more versatile I'd recommend lighter than I use, probably .11 to .52. I'm not sure why the Variax is stocked with such light strings on it. I personally can't stand the thin strings that come standard with it. They literally cut my fingers, probably because I'm used to thicker strings.

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Best for one isn't always the best for everybody. Only way to tell is try different strings until you find the ones that trip your trigger. Realize for heavier or lighter than the stock 10's that come on the Vax's will require some set up tweaks (raise/lower action, adjust neck, set intonation, etc.), so if you're not used to doing that, you should probably get a guitar tech in on the change, so they can get it set up properly.... Just a suggestion.

 

Dave

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On 9/12/2015 at 1:31 PM, DarrellM5 said:

The stock strings are D'Addario .10-.46  (D'Addario EXL110BT).

 

This is the same set that the JTV guitars come with.  I've just stuck with them on my JTV69.

I just checked my Variax Std. it has 10-48, using a electronic digital caliper......the string on it are the ones that came on it. I double check a new set of string to make sure my caliper was calibrated and it was. wonder if somewhere the strings were changed, it was suppose to be a "new" guitar.

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3 hours ago, kamikaze3557 said:

I just checked my Variax Std. it has 10-48, using a electronic digital caliper......the string on it are the ones that came on it. I double check a new set of string to make sure my caliper was calibrated and it was. wonder if somewhere the strings were changed, it was suppose to be a "new" guitar.

 

Like everything else in life, tiny incremental measurements such as these are likely to vary from one brand of string to another, or even from one manufacturing lot to another from the same brand. I've also used cheap digital calipers that weren't particularly trustworthy. Either way, I wouldn't lose any sleep over the discrepancy that your're seeing, even if it's real. The difference in total tension exerted on the neck with the variance that you're taking about will be negligible. 

 

And for what it's worth, in 30 years of playing and setting up guitars, I don't ever recall seeing a 10-48 set, from any brand. 9-42, 10-46, and 11-49 have been industry standards forever...so unless they're deliberately using some weird custom gauge, I'd say you have a regular set of 10-46 on there.

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As stated I check my calipers on a new set of strings also ..so calip. were spot on.....that's why I wondered if they sent me a returned one, not new...

 

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" The stock strings are D'Addario .10-.46  (D'Addario EXL110BT). "--- actually, factory is just the standard issue XL-110,

 

http://www.daddario.com/DADProductDetail.Page?ActiveID=3769&productid=13&productname=EXL110_Nickel_Wound__Regular_Light__10_46&sid=7c0f58da-c580-4432-9972-fbe132fc8fb3

 

... no suffixes. That is what we use here. Some players like the 11-gauge version, which are good too.

 

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6 hours ago, kamikaze3557 said:

As stated I check my calipers on a new set of strings also ..so calip. were spot on.....that's why I wondered if they sent me a returned one, not new...

 

 

Not sure why this is coming up again months later... but again, minuscule discrepancies happen in manufacturing. Nothing's perfect. Maybe D'addario f*cked up and let a bum lot of strings out the door... stranger things have happened. And it's a virtual certainty that nobody at the factory is sitting there with digital calipers and measuring each string that ends up on a Variax... such a minute difference would likely go unnoticed. And even if somebody did catch it, they won't care because they're sitting in front of a giant box of strings and 100 guitars that have to be finished by 5 o'clock... but I digress.

 

Point is, you'll never figure out what happened, and if this is the only evidence you've got to suggest the instrument was used, I really don't think you have much to worry about. Besides, it ain't gonna hold up in court. If the offending string is still on the guitar at this point and it bothers you that much, just change the strings.

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