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erniedenov

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erniedenov last won the day on April 17 2017

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About erniedenov

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  1. erniedenov

    frfr speakers

    Same here. When I first got my Alto TS212, I put it on the floor and it sounded pretty bad because of coupling. Mounting it on a stand was a huge help; didn't have to use an excessive amount of low cut after that.
  2. erniedenov

    Using Headphones with the Helix Floor

    I use Shure SE535 in-ear monitors through the headphone jack and they sound great; no mixer necessary! I have a pair of Sennheiser HD 595 headphones and they don't sound nearly as good, but of course they were half the price of the Shures. As cruisenon2 said, going through an FRFR (or any) speaker is a whole different thing. I have separate setlists for the speaker and the in-ears (and of course tweaking for the speaker should be done at the approximate volume you'd be playing at a live gig). I hardly ever need to use high or low cuts for the in-ears, but I certainly have to for the speaker. Oh, and congratulations on getting a Helix!
  3. erniedenov

    Are any artists ACTUALLY using the Helix?

    Jakko Jakszyk (King Crimson) is using Helix. And speaking of King Crimson, some friends recently saw Adrian Belew's new quartet and he was using a Helix. Just for the record, it doesn't matter to me whether or not "big name" artists are using it; that has no bearing on how I feel about it, or any piece of gear I choose to use. But it is nice to know that several of these artists are coming around to Helix.
  4. erniedenov

    Using FRFR Behind You On Stage

    Also, putting it on the floor (standing on it's side or upright) will cause coupling with the stage and the bass will get overwhelmingly boomy. I did that on my first gig with Helix and my TS212 (about a week after I got it) and it sounded pretty bad (and not something I could adequately fix on the fly). I now have a pole mount and an amp stand. The stand does take up room on the stage, but the pole; not much at all. But the speaker on the floor is not something I'd recommend.
  5. erniedenov

    Noise Gate - Anyone else find it really impacts the tone?

    My Suhr Strat uses the Suhr Silent Single Coil System. It works remarkably well; the only "noiseless" single coil solution I've heard that doesn't mess with that classic single coil sound. You can put it in any guitar that uses two single coil pickups.
  6. erniedenov

    Noise Gate - Anyone else find it really impacts the tone?

    I use the noise gate on the input block for medium to high gain patches only. Gates will always impact the tone and sustain, but I've found the one in Helix to be more transparent than any other gates I've ever used. I set the threshold low enough to where there's still a little bit of hum. It's a compromise, but I'd rather have a small amount of noise than lose the sustain. Some venues are worse than others, especially if the stage outlets are on the same circuit as the lights. In those cases, I'll set the threshold a little higher out of necessity.
  7. erniedenov

    YAMAHA DXR10 and Helix. Speaker on a stand or a amp stand?

    I have a pole mount and an amp stand. I got the pole first, then decided I wanted an amp stand because I thought the lowest setting of the pole was higher than I wanted it to be. I changed my mind after using the amp stand on a few gigs. For one thing, the particular one that I have comes in three pieces. It's not that portable, as the biggest piece won't fit in my guitar's gig bag or the Helix carry case. Of course the stand doesn't either, but it's just one piece. I also found that the stand takes up a lot of room and I don't always have the luxury of space on smaller stages with four or more other musicians. Either could work for you; the important thing is to get the speaker off the floor because of coupling. I learned that on my first gig with Helix and FRFR powered speaker; had to use way more low cut than I should've.
  8. erniedenov

    New FW update coming but....

    Well I'm with you on the Mark IIc+ and Ecstasy. Of all the amps I've owned, those were the two best ones and I deeply regret having parted with them. Still, I'm not sure I'd be using them much these days since I've gotten rather attached to my Helix. But if they could get close to realistic models (with the various tone shaping options each had), I'd be in ecstasy (pun intended)!
  9. erniedenov

    Humbuckers and the 'Guitar In Pad'

    I'd guess you're just hearing more breakup on clean sounds. If that's the case, you could just set the amp gain lower on your patches. Or you could just adjust your pickups to be closer to the body of your guitar.
  10. erniedenov

    Van Halen 1 album tone

    Excellent work; you nailed it (programming and playing)! And thanks for making it available to us for free!
  11. erniedenov

    Wah- too much gain question

    Yeah, that's one of my very few beefs with Helix; you have to reduce the volume level on all the wahs. And it is most noticeable on clean presets. I've owned Line 6 modelers from the beginning: AxSys 212, Vetta, Pod HD500 and M13 and none of them had that problem, you just stomped on the wah and it behaved like a real world wah. It's not exactly a huge problem, but it is a bit of a hassle getting the level right.
  12. Just goes to show you how far digital modeling and profiling has come. I tour with a band that rents Triple Rectifiers for me. Once, a couple of friends and I had us a Helix party/seminar type of thing as both of them were new owners. I dialed up a lead patch in a couple of minutes and the one friend (that is the band's tour manager) said, "it sounds just like your Triple Rectos!" It does, doesn't it?! Helix, Fractal and Kemper all get the job done... and admirably. I ended up with Helix because I'd been a loyal long time Line 6 user... and because it was cheaper, but all three of them are great units! I don't even own any tube amps anymore, though I've had many over the decades. I just don't need them anymore.
  13. erniedenov

    More amps for helix

    A Dual Rectifier sounds very similar to a Triple Rectifier, but the Boogie Mark II and Mark IV are very different beasts. Mark IV has more options but Mark II has a couple of incredible tones that I could never get out of a Mark IV. That said, I'm fine with the amps that are already in there. With all of the various equalization options in Helix, you can get in the ballpark of making one amp sound pretty close to some others, even from a different company/manufacturer.
  14. erniedenov

    Volume matching patches - what's your process?

    My ears. Don't mean to be snarky but I don't believe patches should be the same volume. My clean rhythm and semi-dirt rhythm sounds are about the same volume; distorted power chord/riff sounds are louder and lead sounds are loudest. I try to mix the way I imagine it would be mixed on an album. A great thing about Helix is that you can change the volume of a patch on the fly in one or two seconds. I always save my patches so that their volumes are instantly accessible. If my channel volume is maxed out, I have the cab volume on the ready. I'll tweak patch volumes on the fly at rehearsals and even at gigs (if there's an opportunity like a one or two bar rest in a tune). Eventually all of my patch volumes are exactly where I want them to be, which is the case now.
  15. erniedenov

    In ear

    In one of the bands I'm in (which is a wedding/corporate event band), the band leader doesn't want amps or monitors on stage and we all use in-ear monitors. For that band, I go direct to the board with the Helix. In other band situations, I use Helix with an FRFR active speaker. I have to use separate set lists for each situation and I tweak my patches accordingly; tweak the in-ear ones using my Shure in-ears (with custom molded sleeves) in the headphone jack and the FRFR ones with the speaker at approximate gig volume. The in-ear set list sounds require little to no high or low cuts and the FRFR ones require quite a bit of that. The in-ear set list sounds like crap through the powered speaker and vice versa with the FRFR set list through in-ears, though everything sounds great in the correct application. I'll admit, I don't know what my in-ear patches sound like through the FOH (front of house), but I trust (or at least hope) that the soundman EQs those accordingly and has to use some hi and low cuts. But I'm digging what I'm hearing in my in-ears and that's what the rest of the band is hearing through theirs. I'm guessing my in-ear set list sounds pretty decent through the FOH because I've been getting applause from the audience at wedding gigs for my solos and that's pretty rare for that situation; I don't think it would happen if my sounds were sucking. It all took plenty of tweak time, but it was well worth it; I'm very happy with my tones all of the time. Hope this helps!
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