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cruisinon2

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Everything posted by cruisinon2

  1. You can physically tune the guitar however you wish... the alt tuning algorithms will change the pitch relative to those it receives. In other words, if you physically tune the instrument 1/2 step down, and then select the 1/2 step alt tuning, what'll come out of the speakers is the equivalent of physically tuning the guitar one whole step below standard tuning (DGCFBbD). However, as the manual states, the algorithm is expecting the guitar be in standard tuning, so the farther away from that you start out, the more you invite hickups, tracking issues, etc. As to the use of both outputs, the powers that be have repeatedly warned against using both the VDI and 1/4" outputs simultaneously. Apparently it risks some sort of circuitry "overload". Why this is the case has never really been adequately explained, but nevertheless the official edict is "Don't".
  2. My, my....a little testy today, are we? Well allow me to retort: You are an angry little person (not to mention tardy...but I digress), clearly lacking in reading comprehension and grammar skills. But fear not, I'll be glad to help, because I'm a giver. Let's review, shall we? Here's the question the OP actually asked: "Is anyone else experiencing this issue?" And the reply he received directed him to the appropriate forum where he could read all about the numerous others who were experiencing the very same problem. Question asked, question answered. I'm terribly sorry that this somehow offended your delicate sensibilities.... actually, I take that back. I'm really not all that sorry, and I'm afraid that I'm just no good at faking sincerity. Have a terrible day. Too-da-loo!
  3. With or without the use of alt tunings?
  4. Yeah, for that kind of relatively low volume coffee-house gig, it would be a dissonance nightmare... even if the guy at the back table couldn't hear your guitar acoustically over the PA, you sure as $hit will... it'd be basically impossible not to.
  5. As with pretty much everything around here, half will swear on a stack of Bibles that there's a night and day difference between Brand "X" or gauge "Y" strings, and the other 50% couldn't hear a difference with a gun to their heads... just use what you like.
  6. Live with a full band, PA blaring and drummer pounding away, OK... but sitting in a room, listening through monitors or headphones it'll be a $hit- show.
  7. I don't recall ever being able to download the factory default models outside of re- flashing the firmware...I could be wrong, but I really don't think it was ever an option. Either way, Variax has been effectively mothballed since way before 2019... the last update that actually contained anything "new" was 2014.
  8. No, it doesn't... but go ahead and try it with a Martin. Without ear- splitting volume, it will fail. Spectacularly. Hell, I can still hear my Variax with headphones on unless I'm cracked up to a nearly uncomfortable level. Robbing liquor stores is a bad idea... there's really no need to confirm it with a test run. ;)
  9. Do not pass go, do not collect $200, and place this notion directly in the crapper where it belongs... Pitch shifting just barely works playing a solid body, unless you're turned up loud enough to avoid hearing the guitar itself acoustically... with an actual acoustic guitar, you can forget it. You'll hear both the guitar and the shifted signal, as will everybody else in the room.
  10. "The first rule of Mac hardware and/or OS upgrades, if you rely on them for music production is: DON'T, UNTIL THE DUST SETTLES. The second rule of Mac hardware and/or OS upgrades, if you rely on them for music production is: DON'T, UNTIL THE DUST SETTLES..." -Tyler Durden
  11. Any decade-old "high tech" product might as well be an abacus...don't hold your breath for a face-lift to the current Variax iterations, or much in the way of ongoing compatibility with every new OS that comes down the pike. Variax has been treading water for years at this point...
  12. Lol...3 Rochester ties in the same thread. I spent 5 years (yes, 5...;) ) at the U of R. So who's been to the HOG lately? I miss that place... that, and the garbage plates from Little Venice. Ahh, memories, lol
  13. Only played one, and admittedly I only fiddled with it for an hour or so...but 30+ years and countless guitars in, that's long enough to figure out what I'm holding. It was a nice guitar... just not $4K nice, imho. If I were to drop that kind of money on a guitar again, there are others I'd spend it on first. But that's just me...
  14. Yeah, he's quite a craftsman. It's the one pricey guitar I own... I'd love another one, but can't afford it. And even if I could, not sure I could justify the expense, lol. Maybe in the next life, if I find myself on stage at Madison Square Garden...
  15. Not to me it doesn't... what you're actually getting still has to be worth the coin, whether they're sitting around waiting for somebody to place an order or not. Value is value.
  16. Imho, you've already made up your mind... so yes, you'd likely be disappointed. It's been said that the imports are a $700 guitar with another $700 worth of fancy electronics...and that's largely true, in my estimation. But I suspect that your disappointment would mostly be due to a pre-existing bias against import guitars. Were this conversation taking place 20 years ago, I'd probably agree. However, what can be purchased today in the sub-$1K category from varous factories in the Far East has vastly improved since then, particularly just in the last handful of years. They're really not junk anymore. Would it measure up to your standards? I have no idea, and there's only one way to find out... But as far as the US JTV's go...when you get down to the nitty-gritty, the only promised differences are a quarter-sawn neck, a few extra colors to choose from, lots of vague references to "attention to detail", and frequent use of the word "custom". And that somehow justifies charging nearly 3-4x the price? Almost $4K for a bolt-on (if you're looking at the 69)?!?!?!. Nuff said. Just my 2 cents. You be the judge. I like nice instruments too. I own a one of these (a solid body, not the archtop) https://www.phiferguitars.com/ So I have a pretty good idea what money buys...and I can't see myself spending the kind of money they're asking on a Strat clone with fancy guts. But that's just me...
  17. After hanging around here for quite some time and owning numerous L6 products over the years, I can assure you that there are but two certainties with regard to firmware updates: 1) It "surely" isn't arriving by any particular date. 2) What will or won't be in it is anybody's guess... but as a general rule, the more esoteric the request, the less likely you are to get it. I could be wrong of course, but I seriously doubt this is on the top of their to-do list. Enjoy the mystery... that's all we get.
  18. If guitars all sounded the same, then we'd all own just one, and save ourselves a small fortune...
  19. Old-school, traditional guitar cabinets (which is what you have) are passive. They require a power amp to drive them... be it the power section of a head, or a separate stand alone power amp...it's always been that way. The PodGo has no power section... the signal it puts out is line- level, that's it. Digital models of amplifiers cannot drive real-world, physical speakers...doesn't work that way. 1's and 0's can't push air. Modeled power sections mimic how those amps affect/ contribute to a rig's tone, but that's where it ends. You need a power amp between the POD and that cabinet if you want to hear anything.
  20. No. You've got two options: 1) Waste countless hours downloading and auditioning patch after patch that will allegedly sound like "Artist X" or "Song Y". I'll save you the suspense... the overwhelming majority will not, for a multitude of reasons. 2) Learn to use the unit and do it yourself. In the end, the latter option will save you tons of time and endless aggravation, wondering why a patch that someone else created, with a different guitar, different monitors, headphones, listening environment, at a different volume, etc etc etc... fails to sound like what it's supposed to on your end, with your gear. Start here:
  21. If you enjoy doing everything twice, then it's ideal... This is a "penny wise, pound foolish" discussion. In the name of saving a few bucks, you're gonna double your grunt work, as well as the potential for future problems to troubleshoot. Things change. While any particular piece of gear might be perfect for your needs at a given time, there's zero guarantee that it'll remain that way forever. In fact, it's a virtual certainty that it won't. I've played out this exact scenario countless times over the years. But if I live to be 1000, I'll never understand the philosophy of trying to solve a problem by doubling down on a solution that, on it's own, has already proven insufficient... all you've got then is twice the mediocrity, spliced together with workarounds and happy thoughts. It might technically "work", but with more aggravation and twice the upkeep...(firmware updates, backups, maintaining/rearranging set lists, etc etc etc). While you're at it, you might as well decide to run everything on a Linux platform... then you could really grind to a halt...;) If you have a car with a spent transmission, buying a second one with the same problem to rot in the driveway beside the first, won't get you to work on time. Decide what you need, and get it. If something is no longer useful, sell it/ donate it/ use it for target practice... life is hard enough without installing your own speed bumps.
  22. There's only so much you can do when the lights are out and nobody's home... which is basically nothing. Unfortunately, it dun shat the bed... service ticket time.
  23. I suspect that you may not understand what this function is for, or how it works. It's a quick way to adjust settings for time-based effects (delays, etc) when either playing along with a recording at any given tempo, or playing live with a drummer. All the tap tempo function does is measure the time between clicks of the footswitch, and display it. You're not scrolling through a bunch of preset values... it's simply displaying the tempo you've provided. Likewise, if you're in HX Edit, it's measuring the time between mouse-clicks when you place the cursor over the tempo value in the upper right corner. Whichever method you choose, if you click twice at an interval of 70 bpm, then that's what will be displayed. If you click it 100 times, it will continually update and display the average tempo from the input it's receiving. And yes, the more you click, you can expect the number to vary slightly...unless you possess android-like precision. Assuming that you've got any rhythm at all though, if you continue to click it'll eventually settle in at a relatively constant rate. However, if your timing is all over the map, and you constantly vary your tapping speed, then the number you see displayed will likewise be jumping all over the place, and the only way you'll get what you want is by chance. If you require 70 bpm and can't manage to tap at that speed consistently, then you have two options: 1) Highlight the tempo value in HX Edit, and type in the number you want, or 2) Dial it in with the knob on the device itself.
  24. There's no objective truth to be found here... A quick stroll through the forums will reveal 10+ years worth of discussions, arguments, and emphatic proclamations about the differences between this model, that model, and the other one over there. The only certainty is that one man's "night and day difference" is another's "sounds the same to me". My "authentic Strat reproduction" might be your "Are you kidding? It sounds like a mud-covered banjo". In the end, what your ears tell you is all that matters, not what mine are telling me...and neither of us is "right" or "wrong". The simple fact is that we're not all blessed with the same ability to make subtle distinctions between different sounds... if we could, we'd all be award winning producers, engineers, or sought-after studio musicians playing on hit after hit. To Joe Average, an electric guitar is an electric guitar. Blindfolded, most couldn't tell a Les Paul from a Tele, nevermind two slightly different LP's with the same pickups... and even amongst other guitar players, abilities vary. What you hear is what you hear, and either you'll agree with someone else's subjective assessment, or you won't... in the end all that really matters is whether or not you like what you hear. Dial them up, and decide...
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