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brue58ski

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brue58ski last won the day on January 14

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About brue58ski

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  1. I actually used 11's for the Variax but a couple of years ago, my age got the better of me and I had to go to 10's. I will go no lower on a Variax. I use the Helix to control the Variax and it has issues with the tone knob. So for now I have to have it full on/open. I can't wait until it's fixed because I prefer the acoustics when the tone knob is not full on/open.
  2. Yes I agree. I know electronics/computers can and often will fail after a time. But my first generation Variax still works after 15 years. I'm almost positive I will not be getting another Variax, even if a new version comes out unless there is a commitment to keep the Workbench software working. I do not see that happening. I do have and keep an old computer, but it is a hassle to dig it out if I want to mess with my old Variax. Back in the day, I took my SG humbucking pickups (Seymour Duncan Jeff Beck) and rewired them. I had three switches. Two for the pickups and one for the pickup selector. Each had 6 positions. The positions of the two switches for each pickup caused the pickups to be wired 6 ways, Series/in phase, series/out of phase, single coil 1, single coil 2. parallel/in phase, parallel out of phase. Then the pickup selector also did the same thing for the two pickups, so 6x6x6 gave me 216 possible settings. Noisy as hell (noise gate was always on). I was just getting ready to put a new bridge in with piezos imbedded for a simulated acoustic. Then.....the Variax came out. Still have the bridge (it's not installed). I guess if my Variax's fail, I'll be installing that piezo bridge. ;)
  3. I got one of the first Variax's and got the JTV when it came out. Unless Line 6 continues to update the Workbench software so I can continue to take full advantage of my older Variax, I will never buy a Variax again. My SG from 1975 still works. I expect the same from a Variax or at least if it is still working, to be able to still program it from Workbench. I know I'm not supposed to expect that. But, again, if I know it can't last more than 10 - 15 years, I'm done with the Variax. We'll see how it goes. I'll play the ones I have until they die. to me if you're going to make a Variax guitar, if you want people to buy them and continue to buy them, at the very least, if I have one that works, I think ya gotta at least commit to keep up with the Workbench software. Hardware will fail I guess but if in 10-20 more years my Variax hardware is still working, I want the Workbench to work as well.
  4. I put a rubber washer under the volume knob so it will still turn but with a little effort. it's enough to keep it in place if I accidentally hit it.
  5. I've never had it happen to me but it sure sounds like somehow the 12 string sympathetic strings are leaking through. I would be curious what Workbench HD shows. I'm not sure about the JTV's and I'm not sure I will be explaing this well but the first generation of Variax's model knob was not based on detents or positions that were on the pot. I mean you got "clicks" per say but the "clicks" were piece of metal and there were indents on the knob itself but the pot was like a volume knob. So model selection appeared to be based on the resistance of the pot. This was often never an issue but some times you had to calibrate the knob. I wonder if the JTV is the same and maybe your select knob calibration is a little off. Not sure if this makes sense. Hope this helps.
  6. I own a Variax and I am curious which is which. I'm pretty sure the 1st one was Variax and the third one was the Taylor. Can you tell me what each of the Variax models were? I play my Variax through the VDI on a Helix and your sounds seem to have more body. I wonder if going out the 1/4" on the Variax makes a difference. Hey I just got a Taylor 324CE but it's mahogany top with a Tasmanian blackwood body. It's the nicest instrument I've ever owned. The best non-acoustic acoustic sound I ever got was with the first generation of Variax technology and the POD HD 500X. It was the Variax acoustics with a certain mic preamp in the POD. I can't remember which one. The acoustics were only OK until you added this one preamp. I would have never hesitated to use it. Shortly after that, the second variation of Variax's came out. I got one and the acoustics IMHO, were thinner sounding. Too much high end zing. Not enough "body". No preamp in the POD or the Helix would fix it. I've tried EQ and IR's and it never get's to what I had with the old Variax and POD HD 500. Good enough in a pinch but a real acoustic is way better. Why don't I just go back to the old Variax? Because, I would only be doing it for the acoustics, Otherwise I like the models better on the JTV Variax's.
  7. The best nonacoustic acoustic sound I ever got was with the first generation of Variax technology and the POD HD 500X. It was the kVariax acoustics with a certain mic preamp in the POD. I can'rt remember which one. The acoustics were only OK until you added this one preamp. I would have never hesitated to use it. Shortly after that, the second variation of Variax's came out. I got one and the acoustics IMHO, were thinner sounding. Too much high end zing. Not enough "body". No preamp in the POD or the Helix would fix it. I've trie EQ and IR's and it never get's to what I had with the old Variax and POD HD 500. Good enough in a pinch but a real acoustic is way better. Why don't I just go back to the old Variax? Because, I would only be doing it for the acoustics, Otherwise I like the models better on the JTV Variax's.
  8. The main problem with meters, especially anaolog ones, is they have a frequency response curve like speakers, mics other electronic gear, so they won't react the same way for different frequencies. So if the frequency response favors, let's say 1K. That will mean if one of the peak frequencies is not that, it will read differently than if the peak frequency was 1K. Meter's are good for getting in the ballpark mostly but ya gotta use your ears as well.
  9. Yes. See page 15 of the manual.
  10. I have a Danelectro Freespeech talk box. I don't know how much you know about talk boxes but here's the path using a normal amp to make sure you understand. The signal goes from to the guitar to the talk box input. In the talk box, there is a little speaker whose sound goes to a long plastic tube. The sound travels through this tube to the other end. You snake the tube up a mic stand and tape it at the top next to a mic. That mic signal goes into a seperate amp. That's right. A whole different amp. That's where the sound is produced. Can the Helix do this? Yes it can and it workds great! Here's the path I use (you actually need two). First of all there are several ways to do this. This is just mine. The first path is your normal guitar into the Helix path. Put a Send at the very beginning of that path and make sure it is set to Instrument Level. Connect that Send to the Talk Box. Take the tube from the talk box and snake the tube up a mic stand to get it next to the mic and tape it there. You want the tube right next to your mic sticking out enough so that the tube can go in your mouth AND the mic is directly in front of your mouth. Just type in "Frampton talk box" in an images search and you'll see what I mean. The mic is what provides the talk box's audio/sound/effect to the separate amp. Since that mic normally goes to a separate amp, we need to create a separate path in Helix with a Mic input. So connect the mic next to the talk box tube to the mic input on the Helix.Then create a separate path for the mic with a mic input. There are several ways to do this but you're on your own for that. So that path goes to your output. You can put an amp or anything else in the path to help simulate the "normal" talk box sound. You can blend the two paths or just have one or the other by turning each paths output up or down. As I recall, for the right "talk box" sound, you just want the talk box path on it's own so turn the other path all the way down. Now you could do this without using the Send in Helix. Just plug into the talk box and take the talk box's 1/4" output and connect it to the Helix. That signal is only the guitar, no effect. Then do all of the same stuff with the tube/mic. It just saves having to use the Send. Or you could just have one path with the mic only. Of course, That's all you' have in that patch. This is a lot and I'm not at home right now. When I get home I will try and find that patch and post it here for you. I assure you that the Helix can do this. I've done it. By the way, this is how talkboxes originally did what they do so I think of this as a "normal" talk box. Just FYI. Good Luck! EDIT: I just looked at your Talkbox manual. One way to think about this is that you are making Path 2 your PA in regard to those diagrams
  11. If i understand you correctly, you are correct. themetallikid has your solution. I've known about this and it is sooooo cool. You can program any switch to do anything on a per patch basis. I think you can even program one to get you a beer! The robot is not provided so cost is an issue.
  12. I learned my lesson the same way. The hard way. Was at a venue with "dirty" AC. Only lost a fuse that day thank goodness. Sorry about your misfortune. That truly, really, is the definition of, sucks.
  13. The free Cakewalk is probably good enough. I'm assuming it allows you to use plugins. The best free "full featured" DAW that I'm aware of is called Reaper. it's not user friendly but a lot of people like it and there's a ton of info on how to use it out there.
  14. Not to negate the previous post but Native is approx $500 however, if you get an LT, it's only approx $100. If you think you would use it. And if you have to get both an audio interface and monitors, the price starts getting closer to the LT. $500 plus the Focusrite 212-approx $160 and the monitors which, the cheapest (that you probably would not want) was approx $100. So now you're at $760. And you will probably want a better studio monitor so you're now probably at $800 to $900. You may already have all of that but it is something to think about. Then again, you'd probaly have to get studio monitors for the LT too, so that is not so much of an issue. Also, remember it is a VST plug in and not a stand alone program. So you would have to have a DAW of some kind and use it inside that program. So you need to be comfortable doing that kind of thing. It's not just plug in and play. You'd have to do a little setting up before you could start strumming unless you kept your DAW running all the time. There are stand alone programs that will run VST plugins but it all is more hassle to use than an LT. And there will be some latency. This is all, of course, just my opinion.
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