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Found 7 results

  1. I purchased a Relay G10 about 45 days ago and have had nothing but problems. My first gig the day of purchase went fairly well, only one dropout about 35 feet from the receiver all night. The following week I plugged it in at a venue and the receiver was completely dead. No LEDs. I was forced to revert back to wire. I got home and plugged it in and it worked. I thought maybe I had a bad electrical outlet. The following week at another venue I again had the same issue. Completely dead. I tried several different outlets to no avail. Reverted back to wire. Tried it at home again later, worked fine. Next gig the unit powered up however I had to stand directly next to the receiver. Any further than 7 feet away I lost signal. Uplugged it and reverted back to wire. So this goes on for weeks. Sometimes it works great but more often it doesn't. I try it again at home and this time it doesn't work. I check the outlet and the cables and to my shock I find the USB cable can be plugged in backwards! And of course it doesn't work plugged in backwards. I test it with another cable and find it can be plugged in and seated completely backwards as well. Looking at the receptacle in the power supply I found a non-standard pin type connector rather than a USB connector. Its a very disappointing design and does not meet the keyed criteria of the USB specifications. So Friday I took it to an important gig now conscious of the connector polarity issue, plugged it in and it is dead. No lights. I swap the polarity and nothing. Dead. I look at the receptacle connections and find the first two pins are bent completely sideways flattened against the bottom of the connector. I revert back to wire. So yesterday I Googled this problem and discovered that this has been a major issue with the product since 2016. Why do you sell stuff that has known problems that can be easily re-engineered? And why would a person who discovered that you sell stuff that is known to have problems (that you don't fix) continue to by Line 6 products? And since its been more than 30 days how do I get my money back for this thing?
  2. munger77

    Relay G70 recall?

    Dear Line 6, Is there a recall on G70 relay units? I bought mine new several months ago and it does not hold a signal for more than 5 seconds, despite updating firmware, cables and reading every single post on the forums. Let me know, thanks very much.
  3. Hi Im from Sweden so please excuse my bad grammar and poor vocabulary. I have a Line6 Variax 300, and it have begun developing some annoying issues. First of all : DROPOUTS _Regardless_ if i use the external powersupply or if i use the internal batteries (it happends no matter what). It have some problems with sound-dropouts. Not unlike the sound you get if you turn off an tube amp while playing. It get quieter and start to distort the sound and eventually becomes silent. Sometimes i can reverse the process by pushing the "bank selector" or just by tapping the pickguard around the "bank selector". But most of the time i have to pull out the cable and put it in again. The guitar starts up and may be playable for another 30s to 3h after that. Do you know how to correct this ? Is it the electronics thats failing or the output-jack? Oxidation? ?!?! Second: Changes the soundbank randomly. Sometimes while im playing, it starts shifting soundbank / settings. Most often is it while im using the "tele or strat"-banks or the "Acousting or Resonator"-banks. To solve this ive used the same solution as above, pulling the cord and puting it in again. Any real solutions for this issue? I really like the instrument both for the sounds and the feeling it gives me while playing it... so i really want to solve these issues.
  4. Deutsche Version. Version française. Preparing the Room: Remote Antennas This guide outlines the steps involved in preparing the room so that you and your customers get the full performance benefits of Line 6 digital wireless systems. In order to maintain optimal antenna coverage and the best possible line of sight, it is sometimes necessary to mount the antennas remotely from the receiver chassis. Line 6 offers two remote antenna options, P180 directional and P360 omni-directional. Both the P180 and P360 have built-in amplifiers and are switchable for +3dB, +12dB or +23dB of gain, which correspond to approximately 16', 65' and 124' makeup gains for LM-195 cable. Greater cable distances can also be achieved with low loss cable such as LMR-400 (6.8dB per 100 feet) or 9913 (7.7dB per 100 feet). Directional antennas are recommended for precision reception of one or more transmitters on a stage. Omni antennas are recommended for general reception of transmitters in a wider space such as audience mics. ANTENNA ORIENTATION During setup, it is best to P180 directional antennas on boom mic stands angle the paddles down toward the performer and the area that the performer tends to move around in. Try to keep the antennas reasonably close together and overlap their coverage patterns as much as possible for redundancy and also to take advantage of the system’s time and space diversity, but they must be at least 5 inches apart. The following sections outline typical deployment examples. INSTRUMENT TRANSMITTER COVERAGE To cover a single transmitter used by a guitar player, the two remote antennas should be located at the edge of the stage as close to the performer as possible, pointed downward toward the guitar player’s bodypack, and angled slightly outward from each other in order to cover other parts of the stage that the performer may use. Above is a side view of the mounted remote antennas pointed toward the guitar player. Below is a stage view that shows the orientation of the remote antennas to the performer. MICROPHONE TRANSMITTER COVERAGE To cover a single microphone transmitter used by the lead vocalist, the two remote antennas could be located on either side of the drum set, pointed downward toward the singer’s microphone, and angled slightly inward in order to cover the main singer position as well as the other parts of the stage that the performer may use. MULTIPLE PERFORMER COVERAGE Use remote antennas together with the XD-AD8 antenna distribution system to cover multiple performers. The two remote antennas could be located on either side of the stage pointed toward the performers. The above illustrations are simply to offer general recommendations. In all cases it is recommended to walk your intended coverage area and check performance. Small adjustments can yield big improvements. Remember, antenna patterns should be selected with the thought of including or rejecting pickup of a selected area. Antenna Height and Angle Your remote antennas should be placed at least three feet above the floor in order to minimize RF reflections, and ideally the antennas should be raised just over the heads of your audience, but not too high overhead or up near the ceiling. Antennas placed too high up tend to pick up more undesired signals while increasing the distance from the performers you are trying to cover. Proper antenna height will maximize the range of your wireless system. The overall goal is to place the antennas as close to the performers as possible while also being as far away from any interference sources as you can. For example: if there is a WiFi router mounted to a wall or ceiling in the same room as the performance space, point the directional antenna away from the WiFi router and toward the performer. Antenna Distribution System Line 6 also offers the XD-AD8 antenna distribution system. The system allows multiple wireless receivers to share the same pair of antennas, giving greater flexibility in the configuration of multi-wireless installations. With rack-mounted wireless systems, setup is easier and the wiring connections are uncluttered, with the added convenience of powering the receivers from the AD8. L’installation des antennes Que vous organisiez une installation permanente, un événement ou une tournée. Vous devez installer vos antennes correctement pour assurer que systèmes sans fil performent parfaitement. Ce manuel décrit les étapes nécessaires pour recevoir le meilleur résultat des appareils Line 6 possible pour vous et votre client. Antennes à distance Pour avoir une couverture antenne optimale et une meilleure ligne de mire, parfois, c’est nécessaire d’utiliser des antennes à distance. On place des antennes à distance du récepteur. Line 6 offre deux options ici : L’antenne P180 directionnelle et P360 omnidirectionnelle. L’un et l’autre on des amplificateurs intégré qui sont changeable de +3dB, +12dB ou +23dB que correspond à 5m, 20m et 38m de câble LM-195. Si vous avez besoin des plus grandes distances, vous avez besoin du câble faible perte comme LMR-400 (6.8dB par 30m) ou 9913 (7.7dB par 30m). Nous recommandons les antennes directionnelles pour une réception précise d’un seul ou plusieurs émetteurs sur scène. Nous recommandons les antennes omnidirectionnelles pour une réception générale des émetteurs dans un espace plus large. Orientation de l’antenne Pendant la configuration, il est préférable de visser une P180 sur un pied de micro. Oriente l’antenne vers le bas vers l’interprète et la région dans laquelle l’interprète se bouge. Essayez de garder les antennes rapprochés et essayez de chevaucher la couverture des antennes pour assurer la redondance. Les systèmes doivent avoir d'au moins 13cm de distance. Les exemples suivants montrent des déploiements typiques. Couverture d’émetteur Pour un joueur de guitare placez deux antennes à distance au niveau du bord de la scène le plus près de l'artiste possible. Orienté vers le bas et vers le body pack de l’artiste aussi un peut vers l’extérieur pour couvre autres parties de la scène que l'artiste pourrait utiliser. Antennes à distance fixés et orienté vers l’interprète. Et le vue de la scène : Couverture de l’émetteur de microphone : Pour couvre un seul émetteur microphone utilisé par le chanteur, vous pouvez mettre les deux antennes à distance en position par exemple de chaque côté de l’ensemble de batterie. Orienté vers le bas vers le microphone du chanteur et incliné vers l’intérieur pour couvre la position du chanteur mais aussi les autres parties de la scène que l'artiste pourra utiliser. Couverture pour plusieurs artistes : Utilisez des antennes à distance avec le système distribution XD-AD8 pour couvre plusieurs artistes. Les deux antennes peuvent se trouver de chaque côté sur scène orienté vers les artistes. Les illustrations ci-dessus sont des recommandations générales. Dans tous les cas, c’est recommandé de testé tous la région de couverture pour assurer que vous avez un signal partout. Des ajustements mineurs peuvent produire des résultats grands. Sélectez un modèle de couverture des antennes pour les artistes d’être capable de bouger librement. Hauteur et angle de l’antenne : Placez vos antennes à distance au moins 1 mètre au-dessus du sol afin de réduire les réflexions RF. Les antennes doivent être soulevées un peu au-dessus des têtes de l’auditoire mais pas trop élevé près du plafond. Antennes placés trop élevés sont trop loin de l’artiste et ramassent des signaux non désirés. Une hauteur propre maximise la gamme de votre système sans fil. Essayez de placer les antennes aussi proche à l’artiste que possible mais aussi loin que possible des interférences. Par exemple, s'il existe un routeur WiFi monté sur un mur ou au plafond dans la même chambre que l'espace de représentation. Orientez l’antenne directionnelle à partir du routeur WiFi et vers l’artiste. Système de distribution d’antenne: Line 6 offre le système de distribution d’antenne XD-AD8. Le système permet à plusieurs récepteurs sans fil pour partager la même paire d'antennes que vous offre une grande flexibilité pour configurer des installations sans fils multiples. Avec un système sans fil monté en rack, l’installation est facile et les connections de câblages sont épurés. En outre, vous pouvez faire fonctionner les récepteurs à partir de l’AD8. Vorbereitung des Raums: Remote-Antennen Diese Anleitung wird Ihnen Schritt für Schritt zeigen wie Sie den Raum so vorbereiten können, dass Sie eine best-mögliche Leistung aus Ihren digitalen und kabellosen Line 6 Geräten bekommen können. Um den Raum optmal abzudecken und eine Sichtlinie zwischen Antenne und Transmitter zu haben müssen oftmals Antennen an anderen Position aufgestellt werden als die des Empfängers. Line 6 bietet hier zwei verschiedene Antennen, die P180 gerichtete Antenne und die P360 Rundstrahlantenne. Sowohl die P180 als auch die P360 haben eingebaute Signalverstärker welche auf +3dB, +12dB und +23dB eingestellt werden können. Diese entsprechen einer zusätzlichen Kabellänge von 5m, 20m und 38m LM-195 Kabel. Für größere Kabeldistanzen brauchen Sie Spezialkabel mit geringem Verlust wie das LMR-400 (6.8dB auf 30m) oder das 9913 (7.7dB auf 30m). Ausgerichtete Antennen empfehlen wir für einen präzisen Empfang für einen oder mehr Transmitter. Rundstrahlantennen empfehlen wir für allegemeinen Empfang auf größerem Raum wie z.B. Publikumsmikrofone. Die Antennenausrichtung: Während der Aufstellung ist es oft am Besten die P180 ausgerichteten Antennen auf Mikrofonstative mit Galgen aufzusetzen und die Antennen dann nach unten in Richtung Künstler zu winkeln. Versuchen Sie außerdem die Antennen relativ nah nebeneinander stehen zu haben damit die Abdeckungen sch überschneiden. Die Antennen sollten jedoch mindestens 13cm voneinander entfernt sein. Die folgenden Kapitel schildern typische Einsatzbeispiele: Instrument Transmitter Abdeckung: Um einen eizelnen Transmitter, der von einem Gitarrenspieler verwendet wird abzudecken sollten beide Remote-Antennen an der Kante der Bühne aufgestellt werden, so nah wie möglich am Gitarrenspieler. Die Antennen sollten in Richtung des Bodypacks gerichtet und leicht nach außen gedreht sein damit die Antennen auch Teile der Bühne abdecken, in den der Spieler bewegen könnte. Oberhalb befindet sich eine Seitenansicht der Remote-Antennen und unterhalb eine Bühne auf der man die Orientierung der Remote-Antennen erkennen kann. Mikrofon Transmitter Abdeckung: Um einen einzelnen Mikrofon-Transmitter eines Sängers abzudecken können sich die beiden Antennen auf einer Seite des Schlagzeuges befinden. Die Antennen müssen dann nach unten in Richtung des Mikrofons und leicht nach innen gerichtet werden um so den Bereich abzudecken in dem sich der Sänger bewegt. Antennenabdeckung für mehrere Künstler: Nutzen Sie dazu die Remote-Antennen sowie das XD-AD8 System. Beiden Antennen könnten sich in diesem Falle jeweils links und rechts an der Kante der Bühne befinden und in Richtung Künstler gedreht sein. Die obrigen Illustrationen sind Vorschläge. In allen Fällen ist es wichtig die Bühne abzulaufen und zu überprüfen ob die Künstler überall Empfang haben. Kleine Änderungen können hier großes bewirken. Die Abdeckung der Antennen können Sie hier anhand der Ausrichtung selbst bestimmen. Antennenhöhe und –Winkel Ihre Remote-Antennen sollten Sie mindestens einen Meter über dem Boden positionieren um RF Reflektionen zu minmieren und idealerweise sollten die Antennen über den Köpfen des Publikums plaziert werden jedoch nicht zu hoch oder nah an der Decke. Antennen, die zu hoch plaziert sind nehmen oftmals mehr unerwünschte Signale auf. Die korrekto Höhe der Antenne wird die Reichweite Ihres kabellosen Systems maximieren. Das Hauptziel ist es die Antennen so nah wie möglich beim Künstler und gleichzeitig weit weg von Interferenzen aufzustellen. So kann zum Beispiel ein WLAN Router, der an der Decke des Raumes installiert ist das Signal stören. Richten Sie in diesem Fall die Antenne auf den Künstler und nicht in die Richtung des Routers. Antennenverteilersystem Line 6 bietet außerdem das XD-AD8 Antennenverteilersystem an. Das System es mehreren Empfängern das selbe Paar Antennen zu benutzen, welches Ihnen mehr Flexibilität für Ihre Aufstellungen mit mehreren Empfängern bietet. Mit Rack-Wireless Systemen ist die Einrichtung einfach und nicht überladen. Zusätzlich können Sie die Empfänger vom AD8 aus betreiben.
  5. http://line6.com/support/page/kb/_/computer-based-recording/computer-audio-set-up-and-troubleshooting/usb-audio-troubleshooting-r443
  6. Deutsch Français Please review this link as a further explanation on topics that are covered in the document below: http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/a-small-churchs-guide-to-working-with-wireless/3 As the environment is the biggest factor in wireless audio performance, there is a chance that certain environments and circumstances will not allow for satisfactory performance. This can be verified by successful performance in a different environment. This is an extremely informative video on how all wireless gear works in a WiFi rich environment RF mode switching Relay G30/50/90 and XDV70/75, if set up with the latest firmware have two RF modes. This means two separate sets of channels to choose from. First thing to try is switching your transmitter to another RF mode. Below are videos to help you switch over. Note: If you have multiple members in your band with Line 6 wireless, everyone needs to be on the same RF mode. Pre-Qualification: First Things To Rule Out: Use the factory power supply Try fresh alkaline batteries (a couple of times if it?s a battery problem), not rechargables Try on more than one channel! Try in more than one place/venue Check the transmitter LEDs during drops/interference. RF dropouts result in the green LEDs going completely off. Even one green LED means the signal is present and something other than the wireless system is causing the problem. If you see full red LEDs followed by quickly shifting back to green, it means that the system has re-synced (normal if the dropout is too long). The red LEDs come on only if the intended signal from a Line 6 transmitter is not present. In this case, they are showing RF competing for the same space. Interference: Symptoms Reduction of RF LEDs on the front panel that indicate usable RF signal strength Audio signal muting Possible causes Trying to function at too great a distance Having unintentional transmitters, such as walkie talkies or in-ear monitors, too close to a receiver Significant amount of close-by RF signals within the same 2.4GHz range (Wi-Fi, microwave ovens, etc.) Suggestion "Walk test" your system in advance of an event over the entire desired range to verify that sufficient RF signal is available to avoid mutes from occurring With transmitter off and receiver turned on, scroll through the channels. Red LEDs indicate stray RF on that channel. Choose channels that exhibit the least red LEDs. Note: Line 6 wireless WILL still operate but at reduced range. Decreased Range Symptoms Reduction in range in general Reduced range indoors vs. outdoors Possible causes Blocked "Line of Sight" between the receiver's antennas and the transmitter's antennas Barriers such as walls or air-curtains can impede the path of radio waves Transmitter strength reduced if it must pass through walls Transmitting through earth (receiver in basement) Human bodies absorbing RF energy Cupping the bottom of the handheld mic (covering the antenna) Beltpack transmitter is used in pocket or next to skin Receiver antennas for the XD-V systems are very close to other intentional radiators in the same frequency band such as Wi-Fi wireless access points Incorrect cables on paddle antennas (requires low-loss 50-ohm cables; e.g. LMR-195) Suggestions Improve "Line of Sight" Use the XD-V70/G90 with remote paddle antennas and separate the antennas by several feet. G90 Users: Make certain that you have the proper antenna jacks selected in the setup window. C&D are the front antennas and A&B are the rear. The units may work even if you have it set incorrectly, but the range may be only 10-20 feet. There is also a position for "both" as the G90 can be used with 4 antennas for increased reliability. Weak Audio (thin audio output compared to other wireless systems) Symptom Weak and/or noisy audio output Possible causes Gain/trim settings on mixer need adjustment Plugging into a "line level" input Plugging into a channel with pads engaged Using a TRS plug in the 1/4" unbalanced output The "Environment Filter" may not operate correctly if signal is too weak, especially when using lav mics Suggestions Adjust gain/trim as if using a wired microphone Connect the XLR output (G90 only) on the receiver to an XLR input on the mixer Use a mono plug in the 1/4" unbalanced output, never a TRS plug Turn "Environment Filter" off Dropouts ("Audio" vs "RF" dropout: different paths to correct) Symptoms Audio signal interrupted Possible causes Transmitter on "low" power to save battery life and reduce RF interference to other devices Local conditions in one or more venues, e.g. a large Wi-Fi installation in close proximity, metal walls/roof Instruments or amps being used are faulty Signal chain issue Blocked "Line of Sight" between the receiver's antennas and the transmitter's antennas Transmitter is muted Loose antennas Antennas straight up and down or too close to walls Other XD-Vs/Relays operating on the same channel Unused transmitter too close to receiver Receiver's antennas near any transmitters such as walkie-talkies, In-Ear Monitors, etc Using a substitute power supply Batteries dying or unseated Suggestions Switch transmitter to "high" power Try a different venue to reproduce problem Try multiple instruments/amps to reproduce problem Trace signal through chain one component at a time. "Audio" LED lights when signal is received. Improve "Line of Sight" by moving receiver or taking transmitter out of pocket Unmute transmitter. On the G50/G90/V70 transmitter, the LCD screen remains lit when in mute mode. Raise antennas to 6-8 feet high while avoiding obstacles such as metal posts, walls, etc. Ensure antennas are connected firmly and splayed at 90 degrees with nothing touching them Ensure each system has its own unique channel to operate on Move intended transmitter closer to receiver than unintended transmitter to eliminate "near/far" issue. Switch closer transmitter to low power when possible. Provide ample distance between the XD-V receiver and other transmitters. The distance will depend on the strength of the transmitter and the gain of the transmitting antenna. Use the factory power supply or one that can supply the required 9v DC current: XD-V - 350 ma, G30 - 200mA, G50 - 300 mA. If you are using a pedalboard supply, it must be able to supply this amount of power to the receiver in addition to whatever else you have plugged into it. Reinstall batteries or replace them. If using rechargables, try with standard alkaline to test. Perform channel scan (XDV 70/G90 sytems only) The Scan Channel feature checks all available channels for interference, and recommends the best channels to use: • Press Channel Select button, then press the Setup Button. • The Display shows all 14 possible channels. The best channels are highlighted, and if the transmitter is on there’s also indication of which channel that’s currently set to. • Turn the Edit knob to select one of the channels that’s highlighted as best to use, and select that same channel on the transmitter Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html References for working with wireless systems http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-line-of-sight_propagation http://www.djsociety.org/Wireless.htm Digital Wireless Audio Fehlerbehebung Bitte klicken Sie auf folgenden Link um weitere Erklärung über dieses Thema zu erhalten: http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/a-small-churchs-guide-to-working-with-wireless/3 Da die Umgebung der größte Faktor der kabellosen Audio-Performance ist, gibt es auch eine Chance, dass gewisse Umgebungen und Umstände keine zufriedenstellende Performance ermöglichen. Dies kann anhand eines Tests in einer anderen Umgebung überprüft werden. Voraussetzungen und die ersten Dinge, die es auszuschließen gilt: Benutzen Sie das originale, mitgelieferte Netzteil. Versuchen Sie mehrere Male neue Alkaline Batterien, keine aufladbaren. Versuchen Sie es auf mehreren Kanälen. Versuchen Sie es an anderen Austragungsorten und Plätzen. Überprüfen Sie den Transmitter-LED während einer Störung oder eines Ausfalls. Wenn die grünen LEDs ausgehen, dann ist das ein RF Ausfall. Sogar nur ein grünes LED bedeutet, dass ein Signal besteht und etwas anderes ist die Problemquelle. Wenn alle roten LEDs leuchten und dann plötzlich auf grün wechseln, bedeutet das, dass das System neu synchronisiert hat. (Dies ist normal, wenn der Ausfall zu lange andaurt.) Die roten LEDs gehen nur dann an, wenn kein Signal vorhanden ist. Interferenzen: Symptome: Weniger RF LEDs leuchten auf der Vorderseite auf. Audio Signal verstummt. Mögliche Problemquellen: Der Versuch, das System auf zu großer Distanz laufen zu lassen. Ungewollte Sender, wie Walkie-Talkies oder In-Ear Monitore, die zu nah am Empfänger sind. Viele RF Signale im selben 2.4GHz Frequenzbereich. (WiFi, Mikrowelle, etc.) Vorschläge: Testen Sie Ihr System im Vorfeld bei benötigter Reichweite um zu überprüfen, ob genügend RF Signal vorhanden ist um Stummschaltungen durch Interferenzen zu vermeiden. Scrollen Sie durch die Kanäle während der Sender an- und der Empfänger ausgeschaltet ist. Rote LEDs bedeuten, dass das RF Signal verstreut ist. Wählen Sie einen Kanal, der am wenigsten rote LEDs anzeigt. Achtung, Line 6 Wireless wird auch bei mehr roten LEDs funktionieren jedoch mit verringerter Reichweite. Verringerte Reichweite: Symptome: Verringerte Reichweite im Generellen. Weniger Reichweite innen als außen. Mögliche Fehlerquellen: Versperrte Sichtlinie zwischen Empfänger-Antenne und Sender-Antenne. Barrieren, wie Wände oder Luft-Vorhänge können den Weg der Funkwellen beeinträchtigen. Die Stärke des Sender ist verringert wenn das Signal durch Wände muss. Senden durch Erdboden (z.B. Empfänger im Untergeschoss.) Menschliche Körper, die RF Energie absorbieren. Die Unterseite des kabellosen Mikrofons festhalten. (Mikrofon bedecken.) Beltpack Sender in der Hosentasche oder nahe der Haut. Empfänger-Antennen, wie die des XD-V Systems sind sehr nah an anderen unerwünschten Sendern in der selben Frequenzreichweite, wie z.B. WiFi Zugriffspunkte. Falsche Kabel an Paddel-Antennen angeschlossen. (benötigen verlustarme 50 Ohm Kabel, z.B. LMR-195) Vorschläge: Verbessern Sie die Sichtlinie. Benutzen Sie das XD-V70/G90 mit Paddel-Antennen und verteilen Sie die Antennen 1-2 Meter voneinander. G90 Benutzer: Stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie die korrekten Antennenanschlüsse im Setup Menu ausgewählt haben. C und D sind für die vorderen Antennen und A und B sind für die hinteren. Vielleicht funktioniert das ganze auch bei falscher Einstellung aber dann ist die Reichweite nur bei 3-6 Metern. Es gibt auch eine Postion "Both" beim G90, da es mit 4 Antennen benutzt werden kann um die Zuverlässigkeit zu verbessern. Schwaches Audiosignal. (Wenig Audio-Output im Gegensatz zu anderen kabellosen Systemen.) Symptom: Schwaches und/oder rauschender Ton. Mögliche Gründe: Die Gain/Trim Einstellungen brauchen eine Anpassung. Anschluss an einen "Line Level" Eingang. Anschluss an einen Kanal, dessen Absenkung (Pad) angeschaltet ist. Die Nutzung eines TRS Steckers mit einem 6.35mm asymmetrischen Ausgang. Der "Environment Filter" funktioniert vielleicht nicht korrekt wenn das Signal zu schwach ist, besonders wenn Sie lav Mikrofone verwenden. Vorschläge: Stellen Sie Gain/Trim ein als ob Sie ein Mikrofon mit Kabel verwenden würden. Verbinden Sie den XLR Ausgang (nur G90) auf dem Empfänger mit dam XLR Eingang des Mixers. Benutzen Sie einen Mono Stecker für den 6.35mm asymmetrischen Ausgang, niemals einen TRS. Schalten Sie den "Environment Filter" ab. Ausfälle: Symptome: Unterbrochenes Audiosignal. Mögliche Gründe: Sender steht auf "Low" um Batterie zu sparen und RF Interferenzen bei anderen Geräten zu verringern. Lokale Bedingungen auf verschiedenen Veranstaltungsorten wie z.B. eine große WiFi Installation vor Ort, die nahe Ihres Systems ist, sowie Metallwände oder Dächer. Instrumente oder Verstärker , die verwendet werden sind fehlerhaft/defekt. Problem in der Signalkette. Sichtlinie zwischen Antenne des Empfängers und Antenne des Senders blockiert. Der Sender ist stummgeschaltet. Lockere Antennen. Antennen sind vertikal aufgestellt oder zu nah an einer Wand. Andere XD-V/Relay Systeme werden im selben Kanal betrieben. Die Antennen des Empfängers sind zu nah an anderen Sender wie z.B. Walkie-Talkies oder In-Ear Monitoren. Die Nutzung eines Ersatznetzteils. Batterien wird leer oder sitzt nicht korrekt. Vorschläge: Schalten Sie den Transmitter auf "High". Versuchen Sie es in einer anderen Umgebung um das Problem zu reproduzieren. Versuchen Sie verschiedene Instrumente/Verstärker um so das Problem zu reproduzieren. Verfolgen Sie das Signal durch die Kette ein Gerät nach dem anderen. "Audio" LEDs gehen an, wenn ein Signal besteht. Verbessern Sie die Sichtlinie indem Sie den Empfänger versetzen oder den Sender aus der Hosentasche nehmen. Heben Sie die Stummschaltung auf. Auf den G50/G90/V70 Sender bleibt der LCD Bildschirm auch dann an, wenn das Gerät im Stumm-Modus ist. Bringen Sie die Antennen auf eine 2-3Meter höhere Position während Sie andere Hindernisse wie Metallpfosten oder Wände. Stellen Sie sicher, dass die Antennen ordentlich befestigt und 90Grad gespreizt sind sodass nichts sie berührt. Stellen Sie sicher, dass jedes System seinen eigenen Kanal hat. Bewegen Sie den beabsichtigten Sender näher an den Empfänger als den nicht beabsichtigten um so Near/Far Problemen vorzubeugen. Schalten Sie den näheren Sender auf "Low" wenn möglich. Sorgen Sie für reichlich Platz zwischen XD-V Empfänger und anderen Sender. Die Distanz hängt von der Stärke des Senders und Gain von der sendenen Antenne ab. Verwenden Sie das mitgelieferte Netzteil oder eines, welches 9V Gleichstrom (XD-V – 350mA, G30 – 200mA, G50 – 300mA) liefert. Wenn Sie ein Pedalboard Netzteil verwenden muss diese diesen Strom liefern auch mit anderen angeschlossenen Geräten. Stecken Sie die Batterien neu ein oder ersetzen Sie diese. Wenn Sie aufladbare Batterien benutzen, versuchen Sie es mit Alkaline Batterien. Entstehen Interferenzen durch USB 3.0 im 2,4GHz Frequenzbereich? USB 3.0 Computerkabel und –geräte sind dafür bekannt Interferenzen bei Radio Frequenzen im 2,4GHz Bereich zu erzeugen was zu verringerter Reichweite und Performance für alle 2.4GHz Geräte (inklusive kabellose Tastatur oder Maus sowie WiFi und viele andere) in der Nähe führen kann. Wir empfehlen alle digitalen Kabellosempfänger mindestens 2m von den USB 3.0 Geräten und deren Verkablung weit weg zu plazieren. Nachstehend können Sie einen Link zur Untersuchung von Intel über Interferenzen mit USB 3.0 finden: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Referenzen um mit kabellosen Systemen zu arbeiten: (Englisch) http://en.wikipedia....ght_propagation http://www.djsociety.org/Wireless.htm Dépannage audio numérique sans fil: Veuillez visiter le site web suivant pour des informations supplémentaires concernant ce sujet s.v.p.: http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/a-small-churchs-guide-to-working-with-wireless/3 L'environnement est le facteur le plus important dans la performance audio sans fil, donc il y en a une possibilité que certains environnements et cas ne permettent pas le bon déroulement. Ceci peut-être vérifié par un bon rendement dans un environnement différent. Conditions: Premières choses à exclure: Utilisez l'alimentation fournie d'usine. Essayez des batteries alcalines nouvelles. Essayez dans plusieurs places/lieus. Surveillez le LED du transmetteur au cours des interférences et chutes. Les échecs de RF causent le LED vert de s'éteindre. Un LED vert veut dire que ce n'est pas le système sans fil. Si vous voyez des LEDs rouges qui changent à vert rapidement veut dire que le système a resynchronisé (c'est une réaction si l'échec prend trop longtemps). Les LED rouges s'allument si le récepteur ne reçoit aucun signal d'un transmetteur Line 6. Interférence: Symptômes: Réduction des LEDs sur le panneau avant qui indique la puissance du signal RF utilisable. Signal audio en sourdine. Causes possibles: Essayer de fonctionner à une trop grande distance. Transmetteurs involontaires, comme walkie talkies ou moniteurs in-earqui sont trop près du récepteur. Quantité significative des signaux RF près dans la gamme 2.4GHz. (WiFi, micro-ondes, etc.) Propositions: Testez votre système avant l'événement sur la gamme de fréquences pour vérifier qu'assez de signal RF est disponible. Comme-ca vous pouvez éviter les interférences. Avec transmetteur éteint et récepteur allumé, faites défiler les canaux. Les LED rouges indiquent que le signal RF est dispersé sur ce canal. Choisissez le canal qui montre le moins LEDs rouges. Gamme diminuée: Symptômes: Réduction de gamme en général. Gamme réduite à l'intérieur par rapport à l'extérieur. Causes possibles: Ligne de mire bloquée entre le récepteur et les antennes du transmetteur. Les barrières comme murs ou rideaux d'air peuvent entraver le trajet des ondes radio. Puissance du transmetteur réduit à cause des murs. Transmettre à travers la terre. (récepteur sous-sol) Corps humains absorbent d'énergie RF. Couvrir le bas du microphone donc couvrir l'antenne. Transmetteur Beltpack en poche ou près de la peau. Câbles incorrectes des antennes paddles. (requis des câbles faible perte 50Ohms comme le LMR-195.) Propositions: Améliorez la ligne de mire. Utilisez le XD-V70/G90 avec des antennes paddles à distance et séparez les antennes 1 ou 2 mètres. Utilisateurs G90: Assurez vous que vous avec sélecté les propres jacks antennes dans la fenêtre Setup. C et D sont les antennes de devant et A et B en arrière. Peut-être que cela va fonctionner même si c'est configuré faux mais ca réduit la gamme à 3-6 mètres. Il y en a aussi une position "Both" parce que le G90 peut-être utilisé avec 4 antennes pour fiabilité augmentée. Audio faible (sortie audio maigre par rapport aux autres systèmes sans fil.) Symptômes: Sortie de son faible et/ou bruyant. Causes possibles: Réglages Gain/Trim ont besoin d'un ajustement. Brancher dans une entrée "Line Level". Brancher dans un canal avec pad atténuateur activé. L'utilisation d'une fiche TRS dans une sortie 6.35mm asymétrique. Le «Environment Filter» ne peut pas fonctionner correctement si le signal est trop faible, en particulier lors de l'utilisation des micros à lav Propositions: Ajustez Gain/Trim comme avec un micro à câble. Connectez la sortie XLR (seulement pour le G90) du récepteur avec une entrée XLR du mélangeur. Utilisez une fiche Mono dans la sortie 6.35mm asymétrique. Jamais un TRS. Désactivez le "Environment Filter". Décrochages: Symptômes: Signal audio interrompu. Possibles causes: Le transmetteur est sur puissance "Low" pour économiser la batterie et réduire les interférences RF à autres appareils. Conditions locales comme une installation WiFi large en proximité ou des murs en métal. Instruments ou amplis utilisés sont défectueux. Erreur de la chaîne de signaux. Ligne de mire bloquée entre le récepteur et les antennes du transmetteur. Transmetteur en sourdine. Antennes relâchés. Antennes exactement verticales ou trop près du mur. Autres appareils XD-V/Relay sui fonctionnent sur ​​le même canal. Transmetteur inutile trop près du récepteur. Antennes du récepteur trop près à autres transmetteurs comme walkie-talkies, moniteurs in-ear, etc. L'utilisation d'une alimentation de remplacement. Batteries qui meurent ou sont relâchés. Propositions: Mettez le transmetteur sur "High". Essayez un autre lieu pour reproduire le problème. Essayez autre instruments et amplis pour reproduite le problème. Tracez le signal à travers de la chaîne un composant à la fois. "Audio" LED lorsque le signal est reçu. Améliorez la ligne de mire en déplaçant le récepteur ou prenant l'émetteur hors de la poche. Réactivez l'émetteur. Pour les transmetteurs G50/G90/V70, l'écran LCD reste allumé si en mode en sourdine. Déplacez les antennes 2-3 mètres vers le haut en évitant les obstacles comme des poteaux métalliques, murs, etc... Assurez-vous que les antennes sont connectées correctement et évasés à 90 degrés sans rien les toucher. Assurez-vous que tous les systèmes ont un canal séparé. Déplacez l'émetteur destiné plus proche du récepteur que l'émetteur non désirées pour éliminer le problème "near / far". Mettez l'émetteur plus proche sur "Low" lorsque c'est possible. Donnez une distance suffisante entre le récepteur XD-V et autres transmetteurs. La distance dépend de la puissance du transmetteur et du Gain de l'antenne qui transmet. Utilisez l'alimentation fournie d'usine ou une alimentation de 9V CC: XD-V – 350mA, G30 – 200mA, G50 - 300mA. Si vous utilisez une alimentation pedalboard, il doit livrer cette énergie à l'émetteur. Réinstallez les batteries ou remplacez-les. Si vous utilisez des rechargeables, essayez des alcalines pour tester. Est-ce que USB 3.0 crée des interférences dans la gamme de fréquences 2,4 GHz? Les câbles et périphériques USB 3.0 sont connus pour émettre des interférences de fréquence radio dans la bande 2,4 GHz, que cause une gamme et/ou performance des appareils 2.4 GHz réduite dans la proximité. (Y inclus sont les claviers ou souris sans fil, WiFi, etc.) Nous recommandons de placer le récepteur sans fil numérique au moins 2 mètres loin des appareils USB 3.0 et ses câbles. Voici un lien vers une étude réalisée par Intel au sujet de cette interférence: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Références pour travailler avec des systèmes sans fils: (anglais) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-line-of-sight_propagation http://www.djsociety.org/Wireless.htm
  7. ****If you recently purchased a Relay V75-SC Super Cardioid Microphone and that capsule does not have microphone models when placed on another XDV-75 handheld microphone body, then you will need to update the firmware on that handheld microphone to version 2.10. Instructions for updating Line 6 wireless systems can be found in other Knowledge Base articles.**** Range XD-V 70/75 systems are rated at 300 feet under ideal conditions and the XD-V30 systems are rated at a 100 foot range. This ‘Open Air Wireless Range’ also known as ‘Line of Sight’, meaning the transmitter’s antenna must have a clear path to the receiver’s antenna and be reasonably free of interference. For best performance ‘Line of Sight’ should be maintained between the receiver’s antennas and the transmitter’s antennas. Radio waves travel in straight lines and do not go around corners. Barriers such as walls can impede the path of radio waves depending on the thickness and the type of construction. RF will not transmit efficiently through metal barriers. If you have aluminum siding or a metal roof, it is unlikely the RF signal will transmit through this barrier with much efficiency. When using wireless systems indoors you could experience a moderate reduction in range compared to outdoors depending on conditions. RF will not transmit through the earth so if the receiver is placed in the basement, and the earth or ground is obstructing the line of sight transmission, it will not receive the direct signal. Human bodies also absorb RF energy and can affect maximum range so remember to place your antennas accordingly. Avoid cupping the bottom of the handheld mic as it will block the antenna resulting in a loss of range. Another significant reduction of range can be expected if the receiver antennas for the XD-V systems are very close to other intentional radiators in the same frequency band such as Wi-Fi wireless access points. Using the XD-V70 with remote paddle antennas and separating the antennas by several feet can be an effective way to mitigate this condition. Interference Q: What is the difference between Analog and Digital wireless systems handling of interference? A: Since the XD-V wireless system is digital, it is able to ‘intelligently’ ignore all signals that are not specifically intended for it. As a result, no audible interference can be generated due to other RF signals occurring simultaneously with the XD-V RF signals. Additionally, the XD-V system utilizes a frequency diversity system in which four different RF frequencies are transmitted for each single audio channel. Only if there are errors or loss of signal on all four RF frequencies within a single transmission packet will an XD-V system mute. Loss of RF signal can be the result of trying to function at too great a distance, having unintentional transmitters too close to a receiver (near/far), or a significant amount of close-by RF signals within the same 2.4GHz range (Wi-Fi, microwave ovens, etc.). In all cases, the symptoms will be the same: reduction of RF LEDs on the front panel that indicate usable RF signal strength, followed by the audio signal muting. Once good enough RF signal is received again, the signal will unmute. Put simply, all forms of potential interference for the XD-V system will have the net effect of reducing the total usable distance for the system. If your application does not require maximum range, then typically little concern about other radio signals is required. If you intend to use your system at a distance, it is recommended that you ‘walk test’ your system in advance of an event to verify that sufficient RF signal is available to avoid mutes from occurring over the entire desired range. Output Level Q: Why does the level change when I swap an XD-V digital wireless with my old wireless system? A: XD-V digital wireless are designed to be the same as a wired mic and are "unity" at the receiver's output relative to input to the transmitter. Most other wireless systems have gain stages that amplify the signal above the mic level itself. This means there is no relationship between the input level to the transmitter and the output level of the receiver. If the gain has been turned up on your old system then you will likely notice a drop in level when you hot-swap with an XD-V. This is a simple ‘gain-structure’ issue and is not a measure of sound quality. So if you hot-swap an XD-V wireless with the same mic as the model you have selected you will not need to make any changes to your gain structure. If you are replacing an older wireless unit that has gain added, you will need to balance the trim (gain) controls on your mixer inputs to accommodate the ‘unity mic level’ of the XD-V. This is why mixer inputs have gain adjustments ‘¦ so you can properly match mic preamp gain to the input source. Remember, XD-V digital wireless is mic level output only and must be plugged into a mic level input and not a line level input. If the trim controls are calibrated on your input strips a gain of 25-30 dB will probably be in the ballpark with an average vocalist. Frequency/Channels Q: What is different about the XD-V systems compared to the XDR-955? A: The XD-V30/XD-V70 systems use a higher frequency (2.4 GHz) and operate on 6 or 12 channels respectively, rather than 5. The XD-V channels numbers do not correspond to 802.11 Wi-Fi channels however. Q: Can the XDR-955 microphone be used with the XD-V systems? A: Both systems run in completely different frequency ranges so they are not inter-compatible, but X2 and XD-V units can be used on the same stage (along with any other analog wireless systems) with no problems. Q: Are the Relay G-series components compatible with the XD-V series components (or vice versa)? A: Because they both operate in the same 2.4 GHz frequency range, they are compatible. Q: Do the XD-V digital wireless systems share channels with the Relay systems? A: Both XD-V systems share their first 6 channels with the Relay G30. The XD-V70 shares all 12 of its channels with the Relay G50 and G90 models. A total of up to 14 systems can potentially be combined if the V70 firmware has been updated. Batteries and Power Supplies Q: Can I use rechargeable batteries? A: Yes, but the hours and minutes are calibrated to alkaline batteries. Different battery chemistries discharge at different rates, therefore the battery meter reading may be inaccurate when alkaline batteries are not used. The run time will be directly related to the current capability of the batteries. Some experimentation will be necessary to determine how they perform for you. Carbon Zinc batteries should not be used with XD-V wireless systems. Q: Why is the battery meter higher when I restart than when I shut off the transmitter? A: Line 6 2.4G wireless transmitters have a circuit that measures the actual real-time voltage of the installed batteries and transmits that data to the battery meters in the receivers. The battery meters are very accurate when they have been running continuously since new batteries were installed in the transmitter and the transmitter power has not been cycled on and off. However due to the chemical nature of Alkaline batteries, when they have been shut off, the voltage begins to ‘rebound ‘ and the voltage actually increases compared to its value at shutoff. Unfortunately it does not last long and it reverts to true self over twenty minutes or so. For this reason when you first turn on a Transmitter that has been run but allowed to rest the meter will give a high reading that quickly falls over the first few minutes and continues to fall quickly for the first few minutes. This is normal behavior for Alkaline batteries. Q: What's the battery life of XD-V digital wireless systems? A: Battery life depends on the current capacity of the batteries used. Typically AA alkaline batteries can provide about 2400 mAh and will provide about 8 hours of continuous use from two AA alkaline batteries when run on "high" power. Typically you will get 10 hours on the "low" power setting. Be aware of "alkaline rebound" when turning off the unit and turning it back on, as it may look like it has more power than it really has. Antenna Distro Q: Can the RX212 Receiver antennas be linked together? A: Up to 6 receivers can be daisy-chained together using the built-in antenna distro system. LMR-195 antenna cable is required for linking up multiple XD-V receivers. The last unit in the chain should be "terminated" (using the supplied term plugs) when linking receivers together. (Please see the Advanced User Guide). External Antennas Q: What type of antennas work with the XD-V70 receiver (RX212)? A: Line 6 offers both "omni"(P360) and "patch" (P180) directional paddle style antennas as options. http://store.line6.com/. These antennas have built-in line amps to accommodate long cable runs (up to 100' or more) depending on cable type. Antennas connect to Line 6 receivers with BNC connectors. LMR-195 cable (or better) should be used and the gain switch should be set to match the approximate loss of the cable. There are many specialty antennas made by third parties that may also be used. They must be specifically tuned for the 2.4GHz band. You must remember to take into account line loss when using passive antennas Mic Capsules for XD-V Handheld Transmitters Q: What mic capsules can be used with the XD-V handheld transmitters? A: XD-V Handheld transmitters have been designed to allow for the use of interchangeable capsules from 3rd party manufacturers such as Earthworks, Telefunken, Shure and others. However since there is no actual standard for compatibility there is some risk of unintended signal or mechanical issues. Users are advised to test specific combinations prior to purchase. Before replacing a capsule the power should be shut off. Simply screw on the desired capsule, then turn on the power. Mic modeling is bypassed (and not available) when using 3rd party capsules. Depending on the level of the capsule and the loudness of the person singing/speaking into it, the Environment filter may need to be switched ‘off’ if a gating sound occurs. Using Third Party Mics w/ Beltpacks Q: What is the pin-out for wiring to a TA4F connector? A: Pin 1 - Gnd Pin 2 - V+ Pin 3 - Signal Pin 4 - Z (leave open for instrument)(short to pin 3 for mic) For a normal, everyday, run-of-the-mill, Tip/Sleeve (TS) connector for a 1/4" instrument cable end,... the signal goes from 1/4" Tip to TA4F pin-3 (Signal), and 1/4" Sleeve goes to TA4F pin-1 (Gnd). Don’t worry about pins 2 and 4, those are used for Lavaliere Mic connections. Q: What mics work with the XD-V70 Beltpack Transmitter A: Questions often come up as to what mics are compatible with the system and how to adjust the gain to match other wireless systems. Line 6 XD-V70 beltpacks (TBP12) are essentially unity level devices meaning the output voltage of receiver essentially matches the input voltage of the transmitter. So it raises the question’¦ ‘match the level to what?’. Traditional systems are essentially a mic coupled with a preamp, not just a microphone alone. This may require thinking about your system in a new way. With traditional wireless systems that have limited dynamic range, gain and level control are essential if one hopes to have reasonable hiss free operation without excessive distortion. No gain or level matching is required when using XD-V wireless systems because of the XD-V’s wide dynamic range and compander free operation. So the system gain requirement is to have the speech or vocal input to the microphone present an appropriate level into the mic preamp so that the preamp can raise the voltage to be optimum into the next stage of the mixer. Gain is likely needed somewhere in this chain, but as long as the mic preamp has enough gain available there is no problem re-adjusting the input trim to do this. Just turn it up as much as needed. Just remember to plug the output of the XD-V into a ‘mic level’ input on the mixer as it is not intended to be used into a ‘line level’ input. In order to be able to certify a mic and being compatible one would have to know the distance from the user’s mouth and the level of their singing/speech. The sensitivity of both the Line 6 HS70 and the LM4-T lav mic is -46 dB, so using a mic that is approximately the same in sensitivity will result in a similar output voltage to the factory supplied mic. If a lower sensitivity mic were used with any traditional wireless system you would need to turn up the gain in the transmitter, receiver and/or the mixer. If the levels of these three controls are not in perfect sync with each other the result will be extra distortion or extra noise/hiss. With Line 6 XD-V is greatly simplified. Simply make adjustments at the mixer (in the same way as you work with a mic with a cable). Much less complicated (although it may be different than what a user is used to) it insures maximum headroom and far less chance to get it wrong. Just turn up the mixer, that’s why the knobs move. Remember, the relative position of a knob means almost nothing. The correct place is the correct place’¦ no matter where it occurs on the rotation. Examples: Shure® WL-185â„¢ lav is -45.5 dB WL-184â„¢ lav is -44.5 dB’¦ so these mics would be almost identical to The Line 6 LM4. WH30TQâ„¢ headset is -55 dB so it will need a 10 dB boost of the mic trim control on the mixer as compared to the LM4-T to have the same level. Countryman® E6 headsets come with different sensitivities and are specified per application. The E6ow5â„¢ is for general speaking and is the closest to our LM4 levels The E6ow6â„¢ is for strong speaking and singing The E6ow7â„¢ is for ‘powerful vocals’ and will seem very quiet if used for ‘normal speech’ as compared to our LM4-T. This would likely be a poor choice for general speech but could be the proper mic for a screaming singer. Countryman also provides caps to cover and further modify the mic element which can provide additional gain. Audio Technica® AT831â„¢ lav is -46 dB AT898â„¢ lav is -46 dB * Please double-check that the Audio Technica mic is a model equipped with the TA4F connector. You may need to special order a unit with the correct connection type or refit your existing cable end with the TA4F plug. DPA® 4066â„¢ omni headset is -44 dB 4061â„¢ omni lav is -44 dB 4060â„¢ high output omni lav is ‘“ 35 dB good with very quiet talkers or if the mic is some distance from the performer. Microphone sensitivity does affect the performance of the Environment Filter. If the sensitivity of the mic used is too low there may be audible artifacts. Depending on the situation it may be advisable to switch the filter to ‘off’. Racking V70/75 Receivers Q: How do I connect multiple receivers for rack mounting? A: The XD-V 70/75 half rack sized receivers can be locked together to become a single rack width using the supplied "dovetail key". When mounting a pair of receivers side by side, start with the dovetail inserted approximately half way in the side groove. Then start the second unit, from the front towards the rear and slide until they are closely aligned. A small tap with a mallet and block will align and secure the key in place and level the front faces. Use the short rack ear supplied with each receiver to complete the pair. Multiple rack pairs can be linked together by using dovetail keys in the top and bottom slots of a rack pair. When assembling more than a single pair it is recommended that the left ‘half’ and the right ‘half’ be assembled first and then the ‘halves’ joined together into the 19’ assembly. Wi-Fi Interference Q: Why does my Wi-Fi slow down when I get my transmitter near my computer? A: Because Wi-Fi and Line 6 2.4GHz wireless products share the same frequency band-space. Some users may experience a slowing down or even interruption of their Wi-Fi capabilities when using microphone or instrument transmitters in close proximity to their computers or routers. This is an example of a near/far interference problem and it may be intensified because consumer grade Wi-Fi typically has limited RF dynamic range. Using more XD-V channels operating at the same time will create more competition to Wi-Fi than a single channel would. If your Line 6 transmitter gets within 6 feet of your laptop you may witness this situation especially if your Wi-Fi access point is some distance away. Typically, simply moving your Line 6 transmitter farther away from your computer will remedy the situation. Users of Line 6 twelve channel systems can switch their transmitters to the ‘low power’ setting as this will mitigate the problem as well. If you are using the system outside the USA you can likely switch your Wi-Fi channels to 12, 13 or 14 depending on your location. The frequencies for these channels are outside the Line 6 2.4GHz frequencies. Likewise, switching Wi-Fi to 802.11n in the 5GHz band will avoid Line 6 wireless frequencies and double your potential Wi-Fi throughput. Suggested channels settings to avoid interfering with Wi-Fi. If your wifi network utilizes the channel listed, use the channel # listed under the Line 6 wireless channel column. Troubleshooting Q: Why am I getting dropouts? A: Assuming no hardware issues, dropouts generally occur because of local conditions. Do I have clear line of sight? The transmitter antenna should be able to ‘see’ the receiver’s antennas. Is your audience blocking the line of sight? Raising antennas to 6-8 feet high will often fix this problem. Make sure you are not being blocked by obstacles such as metal posts, walls, etc. Are your antennas connected firmly and splayed at 90 degrees? If they are straight up and down you could fall victim to a dead zone. Are other XD-Vs operating on the same channel? Each system needs its own unique channel to operate on. Do you have the receiver’s antennas near any intentional transmitters such as walkie-talkies, In-Ear Monitors, etc? They will need to be separated. The distance will depend on the strength of the transmitter and the gain of the transmitting antenna. Are you using the factory power supply? If you are using a substitute supply you must make certain it can supply the required 9vdc at 350 ma. Q: Why is the signal so weak compared to other wireless systems? A: XD-V digital wireless systems have "mic level" outputs (both XLR and 1/4" jacks) and need to be connected in the same manner as wired microphones are and with similar gain/trim settings. Plugging into a "line level" input or a channel with pads engaged will result in a weak and likely noise signal. The preferred connection is with the XLR output on the receiver to an XLR input on the mixer. The 1/4" output is unbalanced and is included as a convenience for users plugging into instrument amplifiers. It is important to NOT use TRS plugs into this jack as the "ring" is used for system upgrades and carries digital information that could be "noisy" if it were connected to an audio input. Q: Why is the sound so "thin"? A: This may be caused by the "Environment Filter" is the signal is too weak, especially when using lav mics. Try turning the filter to the "off" position. Q: What does the Near/Far spec mean? A: The Near/Far interference problem is common to all radio systems and happens when a strong RF signal in the same band uses a large portion of the available gain in a receiver making it difficult or impossible for the receiver to decode the weaker signal. Imagine having a conversation in a quiet room with a person 20 feet away from you. It is likely that you can carry on a conversation with normal voice levels. Now if you move to a noisy environment, with lots of other voices right around your ears, it may be very difficult for the conversation to continue with your long distance friend without the both of you shouting. A similar circumstance occurs with radios, and since the long distance transmitter is incapable of increasing its power output, it is very likely a very near transmitter may interrupt it. In the real world, this is rarely an unmanageable problem. You should avoid having a transmitter closer than 3 feet to a receiver that is not on your channel if the intended transmitter is more than 50 feet from this receiver. If this is a regular requirement you should install remote paddle antennas (G90, XD-V70 series). The near/far spec for XD-V70 is 50’/3’ which means if another transmitter (even though it is on a different channel) gets within 3 feet of your channels antennas at the same time you get 50 feet away the system could be affected in a negative manner.. By increasing the distance between antennas (using the paddle antennas) or simply raising the units up higher, it will become far less a possibility. LED Codes Q: What do the different LED colors mean on the XD-V system components? XD-V70 System THH12 Handheld Transmitter: No LEDs (see owner’s manual for LCD screen info) TBP12 Beltpack Transmitter LED states: Blue LED = power/>1hr battery life Solid red LED = Low Flashing red LED = Very Low/Change batteries Audio LED = Green LED (indicates audio signal) RX212 Receiver: Audio Green LEDs = audio signal present Battery Green LEDs = full battery life Red LED = less than two hours remaining Flashing red = Very Low / Change batteries RF Transmitter on same channel as receiver: Green to indicate signal strength/quality: from 5 Green = Data excellent, interference low to 1 Green meaning Data minimal, may have significant interference. When transmitter is off, or set to different channel than receiver these LEDs show as follows: No LED = No data, no interference 1 Red = No data, some potential interference up to 5 Red = No data, high potential interference. XD-V30 System THH06 Handheld Transmitter LED states: Channel LEDs - Illuminates blue to show the current active channel THH06 is transmitting on. Channel 6 LED will illuminate red when battery life is low and blink red when very low (change batteries). TBP06 Beltpack Transmitter LED states: Audio Green LED = Audio Signal Orange = On power/channel change Battery Blue LED = power/>1hr battery life Solid Red LED = Low Charge Flashing Red LED = Very Low Charge Purple: On channel change RXT06 Receiver LED states 3 Green = Data excellent 2 Green = Data OK, may have some interference 1 Green = Data minimal, may have significant interference No LED = No data, no interference 1 Red = No data, some interference 2 Red = No data, more interference 3 Red = No data, high interference Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html
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