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  1. I'm on my 3rd Pod Go Wireless in as many weeks (no, really - 3 in 3 weeks). The first one had issues with the wireless connection - I could be directly in front of the main unit and it would lose connection (I could see the signal go from 3 bars to disappearing completely as I sat there not moving) and would cause severely choppy audio. The 2nd (replacement) was clearly a customer return - it had already been opened and failed to even boot up (thanks Guitar Center). The 3rd (re-re-replacement) has the exact same issues as the first. Can anyone help? I've updated the firmware to 1.30. I literally have to be sitting next to it and facing slightly to the side and even then it is pretty unreliable. I have the Yamaha THR amp which uses the same G10TII wireless relays and have no issues whatsoever with it - even if I leave the room and go down the stairs! At this point I regret paying the extra for wireless support when it seems pretty broken in this device. Can anyone help? I already raised a support ticket with Line 6 (for the first one) and they just told me to return it ... which I did, and that hasn't helped.
  2. Deutsch Français Please review this link as a further explanation on topics that are covered in the document below: http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/a-small-churchs-guide-to-working-with-wireless/3 As the environment is the biggest factor in wireless audio performance, there is a chance that certain environments and circumstances will not allow for satisfactory performance. This can be verified by successful performance in a different environment. This is an extremely informative video on how all wireless gear works in a WiFi rich environment RF mode switching Relay G30/50/90 and XDV70/75, if set up with the latest firmware have two RF modes. This means two separate sets of channels to choose from. First thing to try is switching your transmitter to another RF mode. Below are videos to help you switch over. Note: If you have multiple members in your band with Line 6 wireless, everyone needs to be on the same RF mode. Pre-Qualification: First Things To Rule Out: Use the factory power supply Try fresh alkaline batteries (a couple of times if it's a battery problem), not rechargables Try on more than one channel! Try in more than one place/venue Check the transmitter LEDs during drops/interference. RF dropouts result in the green LEDs going completely off. Even one green LED means the signal is present and something other than the wireless system is causing the problem. If you see full red LEDs followed by quickly shifting back to green, it means that the system has re-synced (normal if the dropout is too long). The red LEDs come on only if the intended signal from a Line 6 transmitter is not present. In this case, they are showing RF competing for the same space. Interference: Symptoms Reduction of RF LEDs on the front panel that indicate usable RF signal strength Audio signal muting Possible causes Trying to function at too great a distance Having unintentional transmitters, such as walkie talkies or in-ear monitors, too close to a receiver Significant amount of close-by RF signals within the same 2.4GHz range (Wi-Fi, microwave ovens, etc.) Suggestion "Walk test" your system in advance of an event over the entire desired range to verify that sufficient RF signal is available to avoid mutes from occurring With transmitter off and receiver turned on, scroll through the channels. Red LEDs indicate stray RF on that channel. Choose channels that exhibit the least red LEDs. Note: Line 6 wireless WILL still operate but at reduced range. Decreased Range Symptoms Reduction in range in general Reduced range indoors vs. outdoors Possible causes Blocked "Line of Sight" between the receiver's antennas and the transmitter's antennas Barriers such as walls or air-curtains can impede the path of radio waves Transmitter strength reduced if it must pass through walls Transmitting through earth (receiver in basement) Human bodies absorbing RF energy Cupping the bottom of the handheld mic (covering the antenna) Beltpack transmitter is used in pocket or next to skin Receiver antennas for the XD-V systems are very close to other intentional radiators in the same frequency band such as Wi-Fi wireless access points Incorrect cables on paddle antennas (requires low-loss 50-ohm cables; e.g. LMR-195) Suggestions Improve "Line of Sight" Use the XD-V70/G90 with remote paddle antennas and separate the antennas by several feet. G90 Users: Make certain that you have the proper antenna jacks selected in the setup window. C&D are the front antennas and A&B are the rear. The units may work even if you have it set incorrectly, but the range may be only 10-20 feet. There is also a position for "both" as the G90 can be used with 4 antennas for increased reliability. Weak Audio (thin audio output compared to other wireless systems) Symptom Weak and/or noisy audio output Possible causes Gain/trim settings on mixer need adjustment Plugging into a "line level" input Plugging into a channel with pads engaged Using a TRS plug in the 1/4" unbalanced output The "Environment Filter" may not operate correctly if signal is too weak, especially when using lav mics Suggestions Adjust gain/trim as if using a wired microphone Connect the XLR output (G90 only) on the receiver to an XLR input on the mixer Use a mono plug in the 1/4" unbalanced output, never a TRS plug Turn "Environment Filter" off Dropouts ("Audio" vs "RF" dropout: different paths to correct) Symptoms Audio signal interrupted Possible causes Transmitter on "low" power to save battery life and reduce RF interference to other devices Local conditions in one or more venues, e.g. a large Wi-Fi installation in close proximity, metal walls/roof Instruments or amps being used are faulty Signal chain issue Blocked "Line of Sight" between the receiver's antennas and the transmitter's antennas Transmitter is muted Loose antennas Antennas straight up and down or too close to walls Other XD-Vs/Relays operating on the same channel Unused transmitter too close to receiver Receiver's antennas near any transmitters such as walkie-talkies, In-Ear Monitors, etc Using a substitute power supply Batteries dying or unseated Suggestions Switch transmitter to "high" power Try a different venue to reproduce problem Try multiple instruments/amps to reproduce problem Trace signal through chain one component at a time. "Audio" LED lights when signal is received. Improve "Line of Sight" by moving receiver or taking transmitter out of pocket Unmute transmitter. On the G50/G90/V70 transmitter, the LCD screen remains lit when in mute mode. Raise antennas to 6-8 feet high while avoiding obstacles such as metal posts, walls, etc. Ensure antennas are connected firmly and splayed at 90 degrees with nothing touching them Ensure each system has its own unique channel to operate on Move intended transmitter closer to receiver than unintended transmitter to eliminate "near/far" issue. Switch closer transmitter to low power when possible. Provide ample distance between the XD-V receiver and other transmitters. The distance will depend on the strength of the transmitter and the gain of the transmitting antenna. Use the factory power supply or one that can supply the required 9v DC current: XD-V - 350 ma, G30 - 200mA, G50 - 300 mA. If you are using a pedalboard supply, it must be able to supply this amount of power to the receiver in addition to whatever else you have plugged into it. Reinstall batteries or replace them. If using rechargables, try with standard alkaline to test. Perform channel scan (XDV 70/G90 sytems only) The Scan Channel feature checks all available channels for interference, and recommends the best channels to use: • Press Channel Select button, then press the Setup Button. • The Display shows all 14 possible channels. The best channels are highlighted, and if the transmitter is on there’s also indication of which channel that’s currently set to. • Turn the Edit knob to select one of the channels that’s highlighted as best to use, and select that same channel on the transmitter Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html References for working with wireless systems http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-line-of-sight_propagation http://www.djsociety.org/Wireless.htm Digital Wireless Audio Fehlerbehebung Bitte klicken Sie auf folgenden Link um weitere Erklärung über dieses Thema zu erhalten: http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/a-small-churchs-guide-to-working-with-wireless/3 Da die Umgebung der größte Faktor der kabellosen Audio-Performance ist, gibt es auch eine Chance, dass gewisse Umgebungen und Umstände keine zufriedenstellende Performance ermöglichen. Dies kann anhand eines Tests in einer anderen Umgebung überprüft werden. Voraussetzungen und die ersten Dinge, die es auszuschließen gilt: Benutzen Sie das originale, mitgelieferte Netzteil. Versuchen Sie mehrere Male neue Alkaline Batterien, keine aufladbaren. Versuchen Sie es auf mehreren Kanälen. Versuchen Sie es an anderen Austragungsorten und Plätzen. Überprüfen Sie den Transmitter-LED während einer Störung oder eines Ausfalls. Wenn die grünen LEDs ausgehen, dann ist das ein RF Ausfall. Sogar nur ein grünes LED bedeutet, dass ein Signal besteht und etwas anderes ist die Problemquelle. Wenn alle roten LEDs leuchten und dann plötzlich auf grün wechseln, bedeutet das, dass das System neu synchronisiert hat. (Dies ist normal, wenn der Ausfall zu lange andaurt.) Die roten LEDs gehen nur dann an, wenn kein Signal vorhanden ist. Interferenzen: Symptome: Weniger RF LEDs leuchten auf der Vorderseite auf. Audio Signal verstummt. Mögliche Problemquellen: Der Versuch, das System auf zu großer Distanz laufen zu lassen. Ungewollte Sender, wie Walkie-Talkies oder In-Ear Monitore, die zu nah am Empfänger sind. Viele RF Signale im selben 2.4GHz Frequenzbereich. (WiFi, Mikrowelle, etc.) Vorschläge: Testen Sie Ihr System im Vorfeld bei benötigter Reichweite um zu überprüfen, ob genügend RF Signal vorhanden ist um Stummschaltungen durch Interferenzen zu vermeiden. Scrollen Sie durch die Kanäle während der Sender an- und der Empfänger ausgeschaltet ist. Rote LEDs bedeuten, dass das RF Signal verstreut ist. Wählen Sie einen Kanal, der am wenigsten rote LEDs anzeigt. Achtung, Line 6 Wireless wird auch bei mehr roten LEDs funktionieren jedoch mit verringerter Reichweite. Verringerte Reichweite: Symptome: Verringerte Reichweite im Generellen. Weniger Reichweite innen als außen. Mögliche Fehlerquellen: Versperrte Sichtlinie zwischen Empfänger-Antenne und Sender-Antenne. Barrieren, wie Wände oder Luft-Vorhänge können den Weg der Funkwellen beeinträchtigen. Die Stärke des Sender ist verringert wenn das Signal durch Wände muss. Senden durch Erdboden (z.B. Empfänger im Untergeschoss.) Menschliche Körper, die RF Energie absorbieren. Die Unterseite des kabellosen Mikrofons festhalten. (Mikrofon bedecken.) Beltpack Sender in der Hosentasche oder nahe der Haut. Empfänger-Antennen, wie die des XD-V Systems sind sehr nah an anderen unerwünschten Sendern in der selben Frequenzreichweite, wie z.B. WiFi Zugriffspunkte. Falsche Kabel an Paddel-Antennen angeschlossen. (benötigen verlustarme 50 Ohm Kabel, z.B. LMR-195) Vorschläge: Verbessern Sie die Sichtlinie. Benutzen Sie das XD-V70/G90 mit Paddel-Antennen und verteilen Sie die Antennen 1-2 Meter voneinander. G90 Benutzer: Stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie die korrekten Antennenanschlüsse im Setup Menu ausgewählt haben. C und D sind für die vorderen Antennen und A und B sind für die hinteren. Vielleicht funktioniert das ganze auch bei falscher Einstellung aber dann ist die Reichweite nur bei 3-6 Metern. Es gibt auch eine Postion "Both" beim G90, da es mit 4 Antennen benutzt werden kann um die Zuverlässigkeit zu verbessern. Schwaches Audiosignal. (Wenig Audio-Output im Gegensatz zu anderen kabellosen Systemen.) Symptom: Schwaches und/oder rauschender Ton. Mögliche Gründe: Die Gain/Trim Einstellungen brauchen eine Anpassung. Anschluss an einen "Line Level" Eingang. Anschluss an einen Kanal, dessen Absenkung (Pad) angeschaltet ist. Die Nutzung eines TRS Steckers mit einem 6.35mm asymmetrischen Ausgang. Der "Environment Filter" funktioniert vielleicht nicht korrekt wenn das Signal zu schwach ist, besonders wenn Sie lav Mikrofone verwenden. Vorschläge: Stellen Sie Gain/Trim ein als ob Sie ein Mikrofon mit Kabel verwenden würden. Verbinden Sie den XLR Ausgang (nur G90) auf dem Empfänger mit dam XLR Eingang des Mixers. Benutzen Sie einen Mono Stecker für den 6.35mm asymmetrischen Ausgang, niemals einen TRS. Schalten Sie den "Environment Filter" ab. Ausfälle: Symptome: Unterbrochenes Audiosignal. Mögliche Gründe: Sender steht auf "Low" um Batterie zu sparen und RF Interferenzen bei anderen Geräten zu verringern. Lokale Bedingungen auf verschiedenen Veranstaltungsorten wie z.B. eine große WiFi Installation vor Ort, die nahe Ihres Systems ist, sowie Metallwände oder Dächer. Instrumente oder Verstärker , die verwendet werden sind fehlerhaft/defekt. Problem in der Signalkette. Sichtlinie zwischen Antenne des Empfängers und Antenne des Senders blockiert. Der Sender ist stummgeschaltet. Lockere Antennen. Antennen sind vertikal aufgestellt oder zu nah an einer Wand. Andere XD-V/Relay Systeme werden im selben Kanal betrieben. Die Antennen des Empfängers sind zu nah an anderen Sender wie z.B. Walkie-Talkies oder In-Ear Monitoren. Die Nutzung eines Ersatznetzteils. Batterien wird leer oder sitzt nicht korrekt. Vorschläge: Schalten Sie den Transmitter auf "High". Versuchen Sie es in einer anderen Umgebung um das Problem zu reproduzieren. Versuchen Sie verschiedene Instrumente/Verstärker um so das Problem zu reproduzieren. Verfolgen Sie das Signal durch die Kette ein Gerät nach dem anderen. "Audio" LEDs gehen an, wenn ein Signal besteht. Verbessern Sie die Sichtlinie indem Sie den Empfänger versetzen oder den Sender aus der Hosentasche nehmen. Heben Sie die Stummschaltung auf. Auf den G50/G90/V70 Sender bleibt der LCD Bildschirm auch dann an, wenn das Gerät im Stumm-Modus ist. Bringen Sie die Antennen auf eine 2-3Meter höhere Position während Sie andere Hindernisse wie Metallpfosten oder Wände. Stellen Sie sicher, dass die Antennen ordentlich befestigt und 90Grad gespreizt sind sodass nichts sie berührt. Stellen Sie sicher, dass jedes System seinen eigenen Kanal hat. Bewegen Sie den beabsichtigten Sender näher an den Empfänger als den nicht beabsichtigten um so Near/Far Problemen vorzubeugen. Schalten Sie den näheren Sender auf "Low" wenn möglich. Sorgen Sie für reichlich Platz zwischen XD-V Empfänger und anderen Sender. Die Distanz hängt von der Stärke des Senders und Gain von der sendenen Antenne ab. Verwenden Sie das mitgelieferte Netzteil oder eines, welches 9V Gleichstrom (XD-V – 350mA, G30 – 200mA, G50 – 300mA) liefert. Wenn Sie ein Pedalboard Netzteil verwenden muss diese diesen Strom liefern auch mit anderen angeschlossenen Geräten. Stecken Sie die Batterien neu ein oder ersetzen Sie diese. Wenn Sie aufladbare Batterien benutzen, versuchen Sie es mit Alkaline Batterien. Entstehen Interferenzen durch USB 3.0 im 2,4GHz Frequenzbereich? USB 3.0 Computerkabel und –geräte sind dafür bekannt Interferenzen bei Radio Frequenzen im 2,4GHz Bereich zu erzeugen was zu verringerter Reichweite und Performance für alle 2.4GHz Geräte (inklusive kabellose Tastatur oder Maus sowie WiFi und viele andere) in der Nähe führen kann. Wir empfehlen alle digitalen Kabellosempfänger mindestens 2m von den USB 3.0 Geräten und deren Verkablung weit weg zu plazieren. Nachstehend können Sie einen Link zur Untersuchung von Intel über Interferenzen mit USB 3.0 finden: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Referenzen um mit kabellosen Systemen zu arbeiten: (Englisch) http://en.wikipedia....ght_propagation http://www.djsociety.org/Wireless.htm Dépannage audio numérique sans fil: Veuillez visiter le site web suivant pour des informations supplémentaires concernant ce sujet s.v.p.: http://www.churchproduction.com/story/main/a-small-churchs-guide-to-working-with-wireless/3 L'environnement est le facteur le plus important dans la performance audio sans fil, donc il y en a une possibilité que certains environnements et cas ne permettent pas le bon déroulement. Ceci peut-être vérifié par un bon rendement dans un environnement différent. Conditions: Premières choses à exclure: Utilisez l'alimentation fournie d'usine. Essayez des batteries alcalines nouvelles. Essayez dans plusieurs places/lieus. Surveillez le LED du transmetteur au cours des interférences et chutes. Les échecs de RF causent le LED vert de s'éteindre. Un LED vert veut dire que ce n'est pas le système sans fil. Si vous voyez des LEDs rouges qui changent à vert rapidement veut dire que le système a resynchronisé (c'est une réaction si l'échec prend trop longtemps). Les LED rouges s'allument si le récepteur ne reçoit aucun signal d'un transmetteur Line 6. Interférence: Symptômes: Réduction des LEDs sur le panneau avant qui indique la puissance du signal RF utilisable. Signal audio en sourdine. Causes possibles: Essayer de fonctionner à une trop grande distance. Transmetteurs involontaires, comme walkie talkies ou moniteurs in-earqui sont trop près du récepteur. Quantité significative des signaux RF près dans la gamme 2.4GHz. (WiFi, micro-ondes, etc.) Propositions: Testez votre système avant l'événement sur la gamme de fréquences pour vérifier qu'assez de signal RF est disponible. Comme-ca vous pouvez éviter les interférences. Avec transmetteur éteint et récepteur allumé, faites défiler les canaux. Les LED rouges indiquent que le signal RF est dispersé sur ce canal. Choisissez le canal qui montre le moins LEDs rouges. Gamme diminuée: Symptômes: Réduction de gamme en général. Gamme réduite à l'intérieur par rapport à l'extérieur. Causes possibles: Ligne de mire bloquée entre le récepteur et les antennes du transmetteur. Les barrières comme murs ou rideaux d'air peuvent entraver le trajet des ondes radio. Puissance du transmetteur réduit à cause des murs. Transmettre à travers la terre. (récepteur sous-sol) Corps humains absorbent d'énergie RF. Couvrir le bas du microphone donc couvrir l'antenne. Transmetteur Beltpack en poche ou près de la peau. Câbles incorrectes des antennes paddles. (requis des câbles faible perte 50Ohms comme le LMR-195.) Propositions: Améliorez la ligne de mire. Utilisez le XD-V70/G90 avec des antennes paddles à distance et séparez les antennes 1 ou 2 mètres. Utilisateurs G90: Assurez vous que vous avec sélecté les propres jacks antennes dans la fenêtre Setup. C et D sont les antennes de devant et A et B en arrière. Peut-être que cela va fonctionner même si c'est configuré faux mais ca réduit la gamme à 3-6 mètres. Il y en a aussi une position "Both" parce que le G90 peut-être utilisé avec 4 antennes pour fiabilité augmentée. Audio faible (sortie audio maigre par rapport aux autres systèmes sans fil.) Symptômes: Sortie de son faible et/ou bruyant. Causes possibles: Réglages Gain/Trim ont besoin d'un ajustement. Brancher dans une entrée "Line Level". Brancher dans un canal avec pad atténuateur activé. L'utilisation d'une fiche TRS dans une sortie 6.35mm asymétrique. Le «Environment Filter» ne peut pas fonctionner correctement si le signal est trop faible, en particulier lors de l'utilisation des micros à lav Propositions: Ajustez Gain/Trim comme avec un micro à câble. Connectez la sortie XLR (seulement pour le G90) du récepteur avec une entrée XLR du mélangeur. Utilisez une fiche Mono dans la sortie 6.35mm asymétrique. Jamais un TRS. Désactivez le "Environment Filter". Décrochages: Symptômes: Signal audio interrompu. Possibles causes: Le transmetteur est sur puissance "Low" pour économiser la batterie et réduire les interférences RF à autres appareils. Conditions locales comme une installation WiFi large en proximité ou des murs en métal. Instruments ou amplis utilisés sont défectueux. Erreur de la chaîne de signaux. Ligne de mire bloquée entre le récepteur et les antennes du transmetteur. Transmetteur en sourdine. Antennes relâchés. Antennes exactement verticales ou trop près du mur. Autres appareils XD-V/Relay sui fonctionnent sur ​​le même canal. Transmetteur inutile trop près du récepteur. Antennes du récepteur trop près à autres transmetteurs comme walkie-talkies, moniteurs in-ear, etc. L'utilisation d'une alimentation de remplacement. Batteries qui meurent ou sont relâchés. Propositions: Mettez le transmetteur sur "High". Essayez un autre lieu pour reproduire le problème. Essayez autre instruments et amplis pour reproduite le problème. Tracez le signal à travers de la chaîne un composant à la fois. "Audio" LED lorsque le signal est reçu. Améliorez la ligne de mire en déplaçant le récepteur ou prenant l'émetteur hors de la poche. Réactivez l'émetteur. Pour les transmetteurs G50/G90/V70, l'écran LCD reste allumé si en mode en sourdine. Déplacez les antennes 2-3 mètres vers le haut en évitant les obstacles comme des poteaux métalliques, murs, etc... Assurez-vous que les antennes sont connectées correctement et évasés à 90 degrés sans rien les toucher. Assurez-vous que tous les systèmes ont un canal séparé. Déplacez l'émetteur destiné plus proche du récepteur que l'émetteur non désirées pour éliminer le problème "near / far". Mettez l'émetteur plus proche sur "Low" lorsque c'est possible. Donnez une distance suffisante entre le récepteur XD-V et autres transmetteurs. La distance dépend de la puissance du transmetteur et du Gain de l'antenne qui transmet. Utilisez l'alimentation fournie d'usine ou une alimentation de 9V CC: XD-V – 350mA, G30 – 200mA, G50 - 300mA. Si vous utilisez une alimentation pedalboard, il doit livrer cette énergie à l'émetteur. Réinstallez les batteries ou remplacez-les. Si vous utilisez des rechargeables, essayez des alcalines pour tester. Est-ce que USB 3.0 crée des interférences dans la gamme de fréquences 2,4 GHz? Les câbles et périphériques USB 3.0 sont connus pour émettre des interférences de fréquence radio dans la bande 2,4 GHz, que cause une gamme et/ou performance des appareils 2.4 GHz réduite dans la proximité. (Y inclus sont les claviers ou souris sans fil, WiFi, etc.) Nous recommandons de placer le récepteur sans fil numérique au moins 2 mètres loin des appareils USB 3.0 et ses câbles. Voici un lien vers une étude réalisée par Intel au sujet de cette interférence: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Références pour travailler avec des systèmes sans fils: (anglais) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-line-of-sight_propagation http://www.djsociety.org/Wireless.htm
  3. Hi Guys, I apologise if this has been covered in depth. I can't seem to find any clarity on this stick model yet though. I just bought a Linksys Cisco AE2500 USB wireless dongle for my M20d. Yes, I know it's got an "A" in the model name, and the compatible dongle stated was just an E2500 - but I took a punt on buying this one, as the E2500 is almost non-existent in my country (Australia). Anyway, I plug it in to the M20d, and wait for it to initialise/be recognised, but nothing happens - the M20d just says "Status: No network adapter present". So is that it then.. give it a bin burial? I had hoped both models would be virtually identical. Any advice greatly appreciated. Thanks.
  4. Hi - I recently bought a Spider V60 mkii and am looking to get a wireless transmitter. I wondered if any other transmitters other than the GT10T will work with the internal transceiver built into the amp. I know that is the recommended one and supported one, but wondered whether others will also work
  5. What's all the fuss about? Industry insiders point to 2009 as the year that analog wireless ceases to operate reliably. Digital television (DTV) broadcasts are mandated to take the airwaves and leave the old analog technology behind. How might this affect me? Many users of today's analog wireless systems are unaware of the impending UHF spectrum changes mandated by the FCC. Furthermore, the FCC is considering potential unlicensed devices and services that would operate in the “White Spaces” (empty TV channels that vary widely from city to city). It remains to be seen what the actual impact of these new sources of interference will have on today’s analog wireless systems as these devices were not made to operate in unprotected airspace. The Line 6 Solution Line 6 Digital Wireless systems are all 2009 Compliant meaning that they will continue to operate reliably for many years to come free from the concerns of interference from DTV and others. This is made possible due to proprietary digital RF technology that broadcasts at 900 MHz while utilizing a unique digital key to lock out all other sources of interference. Will Line 6 digital wireless systems work outside of the U.S.? Your only limitation in using our systems is whether or not it is legal to broadcast in the 900 MHz range (specifically, 902-928 MHz). Each country has its own regulations and ways of enforcement. You should research the broadcast laws in the countries you tour in. For example, US and Australian X2 systems both transmit in the 900 MHz range. However, the US versions use 902-928 MHz and Australian versions use 915-928 MHz. You cannot mix US and Australian components. Australian systems can be used legally in the US but not the other way around. The only system available for Australia is the XDS95. There is no dual-frequency anti-jamming interference protection on this system. XDS-PLUS and XDR95 systems are not sold or configured for Australian operation. When I turn on my XDR95 or XDSPlus transmitter and receiver, the RF light comes on as soon as they are on the same channel, even before I start playing. Is this normal? As soon as your transmitter is turned on, it begins broadcasting RF (radio frequency) and data to the receiver. If you want to check for unwanted RF or look for a clean channel, leave the transmitter off while scanning the channels. Can I run two transmitters (1 instrument and 1 mic) through one Line 6 digital wireless receiver? If you wish to use two transmitters at the same time (as in simultaneous operation), you will need one receiver for each transmitter, each set to different channels. In fact, you can use up to 5 transmitters and 5 receivers set to different channels operating at the same time. You can use up to five transmitters set to different channels with the same receiver, but they cannot operate at the same time. If two or more LINE 6 digital wireless transmitters are set to the same channel, you will experience dropouts and interference. Will I have problems with noise when switching between multiple transmitters? When operating multiple transmitters, it’s best to put them all on the same channel. Power up only the unit you are currently using. When you make an instrument change, simply turn the one you have been using 'off', then turn the one you are about to use 'on', making sure to keep the same channel selected. The receiver will auto- mute when there is no transmitter 'on', so it will not create any noise while making the switch. Will my XDR transmitter work with my XDS receiver? Yes, press and hold the Channel / Mode button while powering up the XDT4 transmitter and it will change to XDS mode. Will my XDS95 transmitter work with my XDR95 or XDSPlus system? Yes, the XDS (pedal) transmitter is compatible with the XDR (rack) receiver, but you will not gain the benefits of a full XDR95 rack system. It will perform more like an XDS95 pedal system. You may gain some range depending on conditions, but you will not enable the Q-diversityPLUS (anti-jam) technology. Please refer to your manual for how to change modes so your XDR receiver will recognize the XDS signal.
  6. XD-V Digital Wireless Systems Comparison Page Receiver Output Level Adjust (Digital Gain Control): default is set to Unity Gain (0 dB), but now the XD-V75 Receiver provides users with the ability to adjust output "digital" gain by -18dB up to +12dB to provide more flexibility, especially when using third party microphones. Note: +12dB gain is NOT equivalent to "line-level" signal; this is still a "mic-level" signal. 14 Channels: up from the 12 Channels on our previous XD-V70 system. 10 Microphone models (for Hand-Held System) L6 (Line 6): Line 6 Custom 58 (Shure): SM58 B58 (Shure): Beta 58 57 (Shure): SM57 835 (Sennheiser): e835 935 (Sennheiser): e935 41 (Audio-Technica): AE4100 767 (Electro-Voice): N/D767A O5 (Audix): OM5 D5 (AKG): D5 *All product names above are trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Line 6. These trademarks of other manufacturers are used solely to identify the products of those manufacturers whose tones and sounds were studied during Line 6's sound model development. SHURE and SM58 are registered trademarks of Shure Incorporated. Sennheiser is a registered trademark of Sennheiser Electronic Corp. Audix is a registered trademark of Audix Corporation. Audio-Technica is a registered trademark Audio-Technica Corporation. Electro-Voice is a registered trademark of Telex Communications, Inc. AKG is a trademark of AKG Acoustics GmbH. 9 Custom EQ Filter models (for Lavalier/Headset/Transmitter Systems) SF1 (Speech Filter 1): Gentle High-Pass SF2 (Speech Filter 2): Gentle High-Pass and High-Cut SF3 (Speech Filter 3): Moderate High-Pass and High-Cut SF4 (Speech Filter 4): Gentle High-Pass, Mid-Cut and High-Cut SF5 (Speech Filter 5): Moderate High-Pass, Mid-Cut and High-Cut SF6 (Speech Filter 6): Aggressive High-Pass, Mid-Cut and High-Cut IF1 (Instrument Filter 1): Guitar Cable High-Frequency Roll-Off IF2 (Instrument Filter 2): Woodwind Instrument Enhancement IF3 (Instrument Filter 3): Brass Instrument Enhancement Audio Metering (LED 5) Red *Clip*: only lights up when audio signal is clipping (LED 4) -06dB: any peak signal -6dB or above (LED 3) -18dB: any peak signal -18dB or above (LED 2) -30dB: any peak signal -30dB or above (LED 1) -60dB: any peak signal -60dB or above Battery Metering (LED 5) Green: 5 or more hours left (LED 4) Green: 4-5 hours left (LED 3) Green: 3-4 hours left (LED 2) Green: 2-3 hours left (LED 1) Green: 1-2 hours left (LED 1) Red: 1 hour left (LED 1) Red *Flashing*: less than 40 minutes left Improved Dynamic Filter: minimizes unwanted handling or incidental background noise. OFF: No Filtering NORM: Filter for Singing TALK: Filter for Speaking RF Channel Scan: provides a visual map of the 2.4 GHz space in the System Setup of the Receiver Unit, enabling system technicians and performers to "map out" the 2.4 GHz spectrum when other wireless devices in proximity are active as well. It also provides visual indication of the RF1 and RF2 mode devices being operated in the range of the receiver. In short, allows the user to select channels that have lower background interference and to better avoid WiFi interference. Crypto Mode: a digital cipher scheme allowing secure open-channel communication in critical situations. Better known as encryption and allows to lock a transmitter to a receiver so that no other receiver (that doesn't have the code keyed in) to receive the transmission from that particular transmitter. This provides security for those who wish to keep their program material from being intercepted by unauthorized individuals. It is typically used in courtrooms, hospitals and board meeting rooms. NOTE: If encryption is active on one device (i.e. the transmitter) and not the other (the receiver), the error message "Blocked no transmission" will be displayed. Improved RF Out-Of-Band Isolation: improved radio front end providing better isolation from RF interference outside of the 2.4 GHz band. Normally RF signals that are not close to the tuned frequency of a receiver are ignored by that receiver, however when they are very close or very strong they may interfere with a receiver. We added an extra layer of protection and filtering to block signals from transmitters outside of the 2.4 GHz band. Mini-USB Port: for any future Firmware updates when new versions are release via Line 6 Monkey. It is now possible to update existing Relay and XD-V products via 1/4" TRS (stereo) cable or radio transmission from the XD-V75 antenna outputs with the XD-V75 Receiver. Dimensions XD-V75 Receiver: Standard 1 unit space height (1/2 width) rackmount Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Additional Links: XD-V75 Manual XD-V Digital Wireless Microphones FAQ Digital Wireless Troubleshooting USB Firmware Updating USB Firmware Updating (Device Positioning)
  7. German instructions: Deutsche Übersetzung ist unter French instructions: Traduction francaise est ci-dessous Relay G30/G50/G90 Device Firmware 2.0 Update Release Notes This release is recommended for all G30/G50/G90 system owners who desire compatibility with Line 6's RF2 mode products. The benefits of RF2 mode on the G30/G50/G90 are as follows: Less impact on other devices operating in 2.4GHz space Compatibility with other RF2 devices such as the XD-V75, XD-V55 and XD-V35 NOTE: An XD-V75 Receiver is required in order to perform this upgrade. If you cannot access an XD-V75 Receiver via a friend or retailer, please contact Line 6 Customer Service for assistance. TBP12 transmitters must currently be loaded with firmware v1.03 or greater to upgrade via Line 6 Monkey. If your TBP12 has an earlier version firmware installed, it will need to be returned to Line 6 for upgrading. TBP06 transmitters using firmware version 1.02 and earlier cannot be updated by anyone but Line 6. Once they are updated, future updates can be done by the customer if they have access to an XD-V75. How to determine the currently installed firmware version: Relay G30 Bodypack Slide the Channel Switch to channel 1, then turn on the Relay G30 Bodypack. Wait for the LEDs to settle, then immediately switch the Channel Switch from 1 to 6, then back to 1 three times (1->6->1->6->1->6->1). The AUDIO LED will blink the version number - Green for the major number, and Red for the minor number, i.e. 1 green blink, 2 red blinks indicate v1.02). Instructions for updating the Relay G30/G50/G90 Receivers: Obtain an XD-V75 Receiver Connect the XD-V75 Receiver to your PC or Mac using a USB cable Disconnect, then reconnect the DC power plug for the XD-V75. "Loader Enabled" should be displayed. Connect the XD-V75 Receiver to the G30/G50/G90 Receiver by using a cable with TRS to TRS (stereo) 1/4 inch phone plugs on either end. The cable should plug into the 1/4 inch audio output of both the XD-V75 and the G30/G50/G90 Receivers Launch Line 6 Monkey, then Log In, then select "Relay G30/G50/G90 Receiver" as your device and follow the on screen instructions Instructions for updating the Relay G30/G50/G90 Transmitters: Obtain an XD-V75 Receiver Connect the XD-V75 Receiver to your PC or Mac using a USB cable Disconnect, then reconnect the DC power plug for the XD-V75. "Loader Enabled" should be displayed. Launch Line 6 Monkey, then Log In, then select "Relay G30 Transmitter (1.0)" as your device and follow the on screen instructions. If Line 6 Monkey is not able to connect to the Transmitter, select "Relay G30 (or G50/G90 depending on your system) Transmitter" as your device and follow the on screen instructions. NOTE: G30 Transmitter owners with firmware version 1.0 should select "Relay G30 Transmitter (1.0)" in Line 6 Monkey in order to connect to the transmitter. G30 Transmitters with firmware 1.01 or later should select "Relay G30 Transmitter" in Line 6 Monkey. ***Transmitter Updaters: please use this Device Positioning document for visual reference on how to place the Transmitter to the XD-V75 Receiver for optimal data communication: http://line6.com/support/page/kb/_/live-sound/relay-digital-wireless/device-positioning-for-updating-transmitters-an-r77 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Die neue Firmware V2.0 wird allen Nutzern empfohlen die eine Kompatibilität zwischen G30/G50/G90-Systemen und RF2-Modus-Produkten von Line 6 gewährleisten wollen. Die Vorteile des RF2-Modus sind folgende: Weniger Einfluss auf andere Geräte, die im 2,4 GHz-Bereich arbeiten Kompatibilität mit anderen RF2-Geräten wie XD-V75, XD-V55 und XD-V35 Bitte beachten Sie: Für diese Aktualisierung brauchen Sie einen XD-V75 Empfänger. Wenn Sie keinen Zugriff auf einen XD-V75 Empfänger über einen Händler oder Bekannten haben dann nehmen Sie Verbindung mit dem Line6 Kundendienst auf. TBP12-Sender müssen zur Zeit mindestens die Firmware V1.03 aufgespielt haben, damit sie über Monkey aktualisiert werden können. Wenn Ihr TBP12 eine frühere Firmwareversion hat, müssen Sie es zur Aktualisierung an Line 6 schicken. Anleitung zur Aktualisierung des Relay G30/G50/G90- Empfängers: Besorgen Sie sich einen XD-V75- Empfänger Verbinden Sie den XD-V75- Empfänger per USB-Kabel mit ihrem PC oder Mac Verwenden Sie ein Kabel dass Stereo-Klinken-Stecker auf beiden Seiten des Kabels aufweist um den XD-V75- Empfänger mit dem G30/G50/G90-Empfänger zu verbinden. Schalten Sie beide Geräte ein. Trennen Sie den Netzstecker vom XD-V75 und verbinden Sie Ihn wieder. Auf dem Display des XD-V75 erscheint ‚‘‘ Loader enabled‘‘. Starten Sie Line 6 Monkey und verbinden sich mit Ihren Benutzerdaten und wählen "Relay G30/G50/G90-Receiver" als Gerät aus. Trennen Sie nun den Netzstecker vom G30/G50/G90 Empfänger und klicken auf ‚‘‘OK‘‘ in Monkey. Die Nachricht ‚‘‘ Preparing Receiver erscheint auf dem Bildschirm. Auf dem Display des XD-V75 erscheint ‚‘‘ Programming MCU‘‘ Das nächste Fenster fordert Sie auf den Netzstecker wieder mit dem G30/G50G90 zu verbinden. Im Aktualiesierungsfenster von Monkey das nun erscheint wählen Sie ‚‘‘ FLASH MEMORY‘‘ und klicken auf ‚‘‘ UPDATE SELECTION‘‘. Akzeptieren Sie die Lizenzbedingungen und klicken auf ‚‘‘ OK‘‘. Das nächste Fenster weist Sie darauf hin dass die Aktualisierung vorgenommen wird, klicken Sie auf ‚‘‘ YES‘‘. Der Fortschritt der Aktualisierung wird im Dispaly des XD-V75 angezeigt und kann einige Minuten dauern. Wenn die Aktualisierung abgeschlossen ist bekommen Sie die Meldung von Monkey ‚‘‘Receiver update successful‘‘. Trennen Sie nun den Netzstecker vom G30/G50G90 und verbinden Sie Ihn wieder und schalten den Empfänger ein. Trennen Sie den Netzstecker vom XD-V75. Anleitung zur Aktualisierung des Relay G30/G50/G90-Senders: Besorgen Sie sich einen XD-V75-Empfänger Verbinden Sie den XD-V75-Empfänger per USB-Kabel mit ihrem PC oder Mac Verbinden Sie eine einzelne Antenne mit dem Antennenausgang B OUT. Trennen Sie den Netzstecker vom XD-V75 und verbinden Sie Ihn wieder. Auf dem Display des XD-V75 erscheint ‚‘‘ Loader enabled‘‘. Positionieren Sie Ihren eingeschalteten Sender ( RELAY) wie unter folgendem link ( *** ) aufgezeigt über der Antenne. Starten Sie Line 6 Monkey und verbinden sich mit Ihren Benutzerdaten. Wählen Sie Ihr Bodypack "Relay G30/G50/G90 Bodypack" als Gerät aus. Drücken und halten Sie den ‚‘‘ VALUE ‚‘‘ Schalter und schieben den ‚‘‘ON/OFF‘‘ Schalter in die OFF Position. Während Sie den ‚‘VALUE‘‘ Schalter gedrückt halten drücken Sie die ‚‘‘ SELECT‘‘ Taste 8 mal bis das Zeichen ‚‘‘ LOADER‘‘ auf dem Display erscheint. Klicken Sie auf ‚‘‘OK‘‘ in Monkey. Eine Verbindung zum Bodypack wird aufgebaut, sollte die Verbindung nicht zustandekommen wird ein Fenster geöffnet dass Sie darauf hinweist. ( In diesem Fall einfach das Bodypack repositionieren bis sich die Nachricht von alleine schliesst) Wählen Sie ‚‘‘ FLASH MEMORY‘‘ und klicken auf ‚‘‘ INSTALL UPDATE‘‘. Akzeptieren Sie die Lizenzbedingungen und klicken auf ‚‘‘ OK‘‘. Um die Aktualiesierung zu starten klicken Sie auf ‚‘‘ YES‘‘ im folgenden Fenster. Auf dem Display des XD-V75 erscheint ‚‘‘ Programming MCU‘‘. Die Aktualiesierung kann einige Minuten dauern. Nachdem die Aktualisierung abgeschlossen ist schalten Sie den Bodypack ein währen Sie die ‚‘‘SELECT‘‘ Taste gedrückt halten, das Display zeigt Ihnen nun die neue Versionsnummer an. Trennen Sie den Netzstecker vom XD-V75. ### Wenn Line 6 Monkey sich nicht mit dem Sender verbinden kann, wählen Sie „Relay G30 Transmitter“ (oder G50/G90 je nachdem, welches System Sie benutzen) als Gerät aus. HINWEIS: Wenn Sie einen G30-Sender mit der Firmware-Version 1.0 benutzen, wählen Sie im Line 6 Monkey „Relay G30-Transmitter (1.0)“ als Gerät aus, um Monkey mit dem Sender zu verbinden. Bei G30 Sendern mit der Firmware-Version 1.01 oder höher wählen stattdessen „Relay G30-Transmitter“. ***Wenn Sie einen Sender aktualisieren: Bitte nutzen Sie diesen Link Visuelle Referenz , in dem visuell dargestellt wird, wie Sie Sender und Empfänger platzieren müssen, um eine optimale Datenübertragung zu gewährleisten. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Relay G30/G50/G90 mis à jour version 2.0 Cette mise à jour est recommandé pour tous les propriétaires de systèmes G30/G50/G90 qui désirent la compatibilité avec les produits Line 6 qui fonctionnent en mode RF2. Voici les avantages de RF2 mode sur le G30/G50/G90 : - Moins d'impact sur d'autres appareils fonctionnant dans le réseau 2,4 GHz - Compatibilité avec les autres appareils RF2 comme les XD-V75,V55 et XD-XD-35 REMARQUE: Un récepteur XD-V75 est requis pour effectuer cette mise à jour. Si vous ne pouvez pas accéder à un récepteur XD-V75 par un ami ou revendeur, veuillez contacter le Service clientèle de Line 6 pour vous assister. Les émetteurs TBP12 doivent avoir le firmware v1.03 ou plus pour pouvoir les mettre à jour avec le logiciel Line6 monkey. Si votre TBP12 est muni d'une version du firmware antérieure à 1.03 , l'appareil doit être retourné chez Line 6 pour la mise à jour, veuillez alors contacter le Service clientèle de Line 6. Instructions pour la mise à jour des Récepteurs RELAY G30/G50/G90 : Procurez-vous un récepteur XD-V75. Connectez le récepteur XD-V75 à votre PC ou Mac à l'aide d'un câble USB. Branchez le récepteur XD-V75 au récepteur G30/G50/G90 en utilisant un câble jack TRS vers TRS (stéréo).Le câble jack stéréo doit être branché entre les sorties jack audio du XD-V75 et du récepteur G30/G50/G90. Allumez les récepteurs Débranchez, puis rebranchez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur XD-V75. Le message ‘’ LOADER ENABLED’’apparaît sur l'affichage du XD-V75. Lancez Line 6 Monkey, puis connectez-vous avec votre nom d'utilisateur et mot de passe, sélectionnez votre récepteur "Relay G30/G50/G90 Receiver" comme dans l’image ci-dessous. Déconnectez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur G30/G50/G90. Cliquez sur OK . Le message ‘’ Preparing Receiver’’ apparaît sur l'ecran. Sur l'écran du XD-V75, vous verrez le message ‘’ Programming MCU’’ Le message suivant vous indique de rebranchez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur G30/G50/G90. Accepter le contrat de licence et cliquez sur ‘’OK’’ Cliquez sur ‘’ Yes’’ dans la fenêtre suivante. L'état d'avancement de la mise à jour peut être vu sur l'écran du XD-V75 et peut prendre quelques minutes. Le message ‘’ Receiver update successful’’ sera affiché lorsque la mise à jour est terminée. Débranchez, puis rebranchez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur G30/G50/G90. Débranchez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur XD-V75. La mise à jour et complet. Instructions pour la mise à jour des transmetteurs RELAY G30/G50/G90 : Procurez-vous un récepteur XD-V75. Connectez le récepteur XD-V75 à votre PC ou Mac à l'aide d'un câble USB. Connectez une seule antenne à la sortie B OUT Débranchez, puis rebranchez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur XD-V75 Le message ‘’ LOADER ENABLED’’apparaît sur l'affichage du XD-V75. Positionnez votre transmetteur RELAY comme indiqué dans le lien suivant (***). Lancez Line 6 Monkey, puis connectez-vous avec votre nom d'utilisateur et mot de passé. Sélectionnez votre émetteur "Relay G30/G50/G90 Bodypack ". Tout en cliquant et en maintenant le commutateur ‘’VALUE’’ déplacer le commutateur ‘’ON/OFF’’ à la position ‘’OFF’’ et cliquer 8 fois sur le bouton ‘’ SELECT’’. Vous devriez maintenant voir le message ‘’LOADER’’ sur l'écran du émetteur. Cliquez sur OK dans Monkey. Une connexion avec l' (Si vous recevez un message sur l'écran que la connexion a échoué, il suffit de repositionner le émetteur jusqu'à ce message disparait). Choisissez Flash memory et cliquez "Update Selection" pour démarrer la mise à jour. Accepter le contrat de licence et cliquez sur ‘’OK’’ Cliquez sur ‘’ Yes’’ dans la fenêtre suivante. L'état d'avancement de la mise à jour peut être vu sur l'écran du XD-V75 et peut prendre quelques minutes. Allumez le emetteur tout en maintenant ‘’SELECT’’après la mise à jour est terminée, l'écran vous montrera le nouveau numéro de version Déconnectez le câble d'alimentation du récepteur XD-V75. REMARQUE: Si votre émetteur G30 n’est pas reconnu par Monkey, essayez s.v.p. de choisir « Relay G30 Bodypack (1.0) » (firmware 1.0) dans Line 6 Monkey afin de vous connecter à l'émetteur. Pour vous connecter aux transmetteurs avec le firmware 1.01 ou ultérieurs, vous devez sélectionner « Relay G30 Bodypack » dans Line 6 Monkey. ***Si vous mettez à niveau un émetteur: S'il vous plaît utilisez le lien Référence visuelle pour une référence visuelle sur la façon de placer l'émetteur au récepteur XD-V75 pour une communication de données optimale.
  8. Deutsch Français Q: Can I use multiple transmitters with 1 receiver? A: Yes, you can use multiple transmitters with 1 receiver, however not at the same time on the same channel. The best practice for that type of usage is to have Transmitter A on channel 1 and Transmitter B on channel 2. Then switching the channel on your receiver from channel 1 to channel 2 will toggle which transmitter you will be hearing. You can do this with as many receivers as you have channels, provided each transmitter is on a different channel and you change the channel on your receiver accordingly. You can also set multiple transmitters to one channel, and turn them all off except for the one you'd be using. This way, when you switch instruments, you'd turn off transmitter A on the first instrument, then pick up the next instrument and turn on transmitter B. Just be sure that no one else using a Line 6 wireless system is using the same channel. Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Suggested channels settings to avoid interfering with Wi-Fi. If your wifi network utilizes the channel listed, use the channel # listed under the Line 6 wireless channel column. Q: Are all Line 6 wireless transmitters and receivers interchangable? A: Yes, any Line 6 brand wireless transmitter or microphone will work with any Line 6 receiver. It does not matter if they are XD-V or Relay systems, you can mix and match receivers with transmitters and they will work as long as the transmitter and receiver correspond to the same channel. Q: Is the Relay G5/G90 transmitter compatible with the X2 receiver (or vice versa)? A: Both systems run in completely different frequency ranges, so they are not interchangeable. However, the X2 and Relay units can be used on the same stage (along with any other analog wireless systems) with no problems. Q: Where do I get a Relay G50/G90 Series Wireless System? A: The Relay G50/G90 wireless units are available at all authorized Line 6 dealers. To locate a dealer near you, please see the Line 6 Dealer Finder: Line 6 Dealer Finder Q: Where can I purchase replacement Relay G50 transmitters (TBP12) or receivers (RXS12)? A: Individual transmitters and receivers can be ordered from any Line 6 dealer. Q: What are the specs on the provided Relay G50 Series power supply? A: 9V DC, 500mA, center pin negative (2.1mm). See the following link for more power supply FAQs: Power Supply and Amp Power F.A.Q. Q: How is the Relay G90 receiver powered? A: The Relay G90 uses a standard IEC power cable. Q: Can I use a Voodoo Lab Pedal Power Plus 2 to power the Relay G50 receiver? A: Yes, but you will need to use the Voodoo lab "current doubler" cable and you will need to use outputs 5 & 6 of the Pedal Power Plus away from "normal" position. VooDoo model PPAP. Q: What type of cable do I need between my guitar & Relay TBP12 transmitter? A: The Relay G50/G90 Transmitter (TBP12) uses a TA4F to 1/4" cable. Q: What is the pin-out for wiring to a TA4F connector? A: Pin 1 - Gnd Pin 2 - V+ Pin 3 - Signal Pin 4 - Z (leave open for instrument)(short to pin 3 for mic) For a normal, everyday, run-of-the-mill, Tip/Sleeve (TS) connector for a 1/4" instrument cable end,... the signal goes from 1/4" Tip to TA4F pin-3 (Signal), and 1/4" Sleeve goes to TA4F pin-1 (Gnd). Don’t worry about pins 2 and 4, those are used for Lavaliere Mic connections. Q: How many channels does the G50/G90 have?? Do they share channels with the G30 system? A: The G50/G90 have 12 channels, which share the first 6 channels with the G30. Q: Can I use the TBP12 from a G50 to transmit to a G90 or G30 (or vice versa?) A: Yes. All 2.4gHz Line 6 transmitters work with all Line 6 2.4gHz receivers to the lowest limitation, channel count, features, etc. Q: What type of antennas work with the G50 and G90? G50: 1/4 wave antennas, BNC-type connectors; detachable. G90: 1/2 wave antennas. The antennas can be detached but RG58-50 ohm radio wire connection is required. Be sure the antennas are not inside a metal case or touching any metal and get your antennas as high as possible. Q: How long does the pair of AA batteries in the transmitter typically last? A: 8 hours on high power & 11 hours on low power. If you leave the transmitter cable plugged but turn the power off on the transmitter, there is no battery draw. Q: How does the battery meter work? A: The battery meter displays 20 minute increments. Be aware of "alkaline rebound" when turning off the unit and turning it back on, as it may look like it has more power than it really has. Q: Can I use rechargeable batteries? A: Yes, but the hours and minutes are calibrated to alkaline batteries so the power reading may be inaccurate. Some rechargables while labeled AA are not true AA size and will not work. Q: What is the difference between the main output and the tuner output? A: The only difference is the tuner output still works when the transmitter is muted. Q: What is different about the Relay G50/G90 system compared to the X2 series? A: The Relay system works on a higher frequency (2.4 Ghz) and operates on 12 channels rather than 5. Q: Can the RXR12 Receiver antennas be linked together? A: Up to 6 receivers can be daisy-chained together. The last unit in the chain should be "terminated" when linking receivers together. Q: I'm a harmonica player and would like to use the G30 with a bullet microphone (high impedance and high output). Its output peaks at approximately 3V to 4V. Will there be clipping or distortion of the output? A: No problem with either impedance or input level. The Relay transmitters (TBP06 and TBP12) will handle 6V inputs. Q: What does the red audio LED mean on the G50 receiver? A: It means the incoming signal is clipping. This will not produce an audio dropout unless the red LED is on for a few seconds. This state will not damage the receiver. Q: How do I register my Relay G50/G90 System? Line 6 Product Registration F.A.Q. Q: What do the different colors states mean on the TBP12 transmitter? TBP12 LED States: Blue LED = full Solid red LED = Low Flashing red LED = Very Low / Change batteries Audio LED - Green LED = Audio Signal F.A.Q. zur Relay G50/G90 Serie Kann ich mehrere Sender mit einem Empfänger verwenden? Ja, aber nicht gleichzeitig auf den selben Kanälen. Für diese Nutzung schalten Sie am besten Sender A auf Kanal 1 und Sender B auf Kanal 2. Wenn Sie dann auf dem Empfänger von Kanal 1 auf 2 wechseln, wechseln Sie den Sender, den Sie hören. Sie können das mit sovielen Empfängern machen, wie Sie Kanäle zur Verfügung haben, solange Sie die Sender alle auf verschiedenen Kanälen haben und den Kanal des Empfängers demnach anpassen. Sie können auch mehrere Sender auf den selben Kanal stellen und dann alle abschalten, mit Ausnahme von dem, den Sie verwenden möchten. So können Sie Instrumente wechseln indem Sie einfach den Sender des Instrumentes A abschalten und einfach den Sender des Instrumentes B einschalten. Stellen Sie aber sicher, dass keine anderen ein Line 6 Wireless System im selben Kanal wie Sie verwenden. Entstehen Interferenzen durch USB 3.0 im 2,4GHz Frequenzbereich? USB 3.0 Computerkabel und –geräte sind dafür bekannt Interferenzen bei Radio Frequenzen im 2,4GHz Bereich zu erzeugen was zu verringerter Reichweite und Performance für alle 2.4GHz Geräte (inklusive kabellose Tastatur oder Maus sowie WiFi und viele andere) in der Nähe führen kann. Wir empfehlen alle digitalen Kabellosempfänger mindestens 2m von den USB 3.0 Geräten und deren Verkablung weit weg zu plazieren. Nachstehend können Sie einen Link zur Untersuchung von Intel über Interferenzen mit USB 3.0 finden: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Sind alle Line 6 Wireless Sender untereinander austauschbar? Ja, alle kabellosen Line 6 Sender oder Mikrofone funktionieren mit jedem Line 6 Empfänger. Es macht keinen Unterschied ob diese XD-V oder Relay Systeme sind. Sie können Empfänger und Sender mischen wie Sie wollen und dies wird funktionieren solange Sender und Empfänger den gleichen Kanal haben. Ist der Relay G50/G90 Sender kompatibel mit dem X2 Empfänger? (oder andersrum) Beide Systeme laufen auf vollkommen unterschiedlichen Frequenzbereichen und sind somit nicht kompatibel. Sie können jedoch zusammen auf der selben Bühne verwendet werden. (zusammen mit anderen analogen, kabellosen Systemen) Woher bekomme ich ein Relay G50/G90 System? Die Relay G50 und G90 Systeme sind bei allen autorisierten Line 6 Händlern erhältlich. Um einen Händler in Ihrer Nähe zu finden, klicken Sie folgenden Link an: Line 6 Dealer Finder Wo kann ich Relay G50 Ersatzsender (TBP12) und –empfänger (RXS12) kaufen? Einzelne Sender oder Empfänger können Sie bei Ihrem Line 6 Händler bestellen. Was sind die technischen Daten des Netzteils für die Relay G50 Serie? 9V Gleichstrom, 500mA, negativer Zentralpin (2.1mm). Klicken Sie folgen Link um weitere Informationen bezüglich Netzteilen zu erhalten: Power Supply and Amp Power F.A.Q. Wie sieht die Stromversorgung des G90 Empfängers aus? Das Relay G90 benutzt ein standart IEC Stromkabel. Kann ich ein Voodoo Lab Pedal Power Plus 2 benutzten um den Relay G50 Empfänger zu betreiben? Ja, aber dazu brauchen Sie ein Voodoo Lab "doubler" Kabel und Sie müssen die Ausgänge 5 und 6 des Pedal Power Plus verwenden, die auf "normal" eingestellt sind. Klicken Sie auf den folgenden Link um mehr Informationen über "doubler" Kabbel von Voodoo Labs zu erhalten: Voodoo Lab Kabel Welche Art Kabel brauche ich für die Verbindung zwischen Gitarre und Relay TBP12 Sender? Der Relay G50/G90 Sender (TBP12) verwendet ein TA4f zu ¼" (6.35mm) Kabel. Wie sieht die Pinbelegung für einen TA4F Stecker aus? Pin 1: Masse. Pin 2: Postiv. Pin 3: Signal. Pin 4: Z (Nicht anschließen bei Instrument) (Kurzschließen mit Pin 3 für Mikrofon) Wieviele Kanäle hat das G50/G90? Teilen sie sich Kanäle mit dem G30 System? Die G50/G90 Systeme haben 12 Kanäle und sie teilen sich die ersten 6 mit dem G30. Kann ich das TBP12 eines G50 verwenden um an einen G90 oder G30 zu senden? (oder andersrum?) Ja. Alle 2.4GHz Line 6 Sender funtionieren mit 2.4GHz Line 6 Empfängern. Welche Antennen funktionieren mit den G50 und G90? G50: Viertelwellen-Antennen, BNC Stecker; abnehmbar. G90: Halbwellen-Antennen. Die Antennen könne abgenommen werden, dann ist aber eine RG58-50Ohm Funkverkablung notwendig. Stellen Sie sicher, dass die Antennen sich nicht innerhalb einer Metallkiste befinden oder Metall berühren. Stellen Sie die Antennen imemr so hoch wie möglich auf. Wie lange hält ein Paar AA Batterien in einem Sender? 8 Stunden auf High Power und 11 Stunden auf Low Power Einstellung. Wenn Sie das Kabel des Senders stecken lassen während der Sender ausgeschaltet ist, dann wird kein Strom verbraucht. Wie funktioniert die Batterieanzeige? Die Batterieanzeige aktualisiert in 20 Minuten-Intervallen. Achtung bei Alkaline Batterien kann es sein, dass Ihnen eine falsche batteriemenge angezigt wird nachdem Sie das Gerät abgeschaltet haben und wieder einschalten. Dies ist ein bekanntes Problem mit Alkaline Batterien. Kann ich aufladbare Batterien verwenden? Ja, aber die Stunden/Minuten-Anzeige ist für Alkaline Batterien konfiguriert und wird so ungenau. Manche aufladbaren Batterien, auf denen AA steht sind nicht in Wirklichkeit AA Batterien und passen somit nicht. Was ist der Unterschied zwischen Main Ausgang und Tuner Ausgang? Der einzige Unterschied ist, dass der Tuner Ausgang auch dann weiterläuft, wenn der Sender stumm geschaltet ist. Was ist der Unterschied zwischen G50/G90 und X2 Serie? Das Relay System läuft auf höherer Frequenz (2.4GHz) und 12 Kanälen anstelle von 5. Können RXR12 Empfänger Antennen verbunden werden? Ja, bis zu 6 Empfänger können in eine Kette geschaltet werden. Die letzte Einheit der Kette muss einen Abschlusswiderstand angeschlossen haben. Ich bin ein Harmonikaspieler und würde gerne das G50 mit einem Kugelmikrofon benutzen (hohe Impedanz und Ausgang). Der Ausgang befindet sich da höchstens bei ca. 3V oder 4V. Wird dies zu Übersteuerung oder Verzerrung am Asugang führen? Nein, weder Impadanz noch Eingangspegel sind hier ein Problem. Die Relay Transmitter (TBP06 und TBP12) kommen mit Eingängen von bis zu 6V klar. Wie kann ich mein G50/G90 System registrieren? Line 6 Product Registration F.A.Q. Was bedeuten die verschiedenen LED Zustände des TBP12? Blaues LED: Batterie voll. Durchgehend leuchtendes rotes LED: Batterie schwach. Blinkendes rotes LED: Batterie fast leer, bitte ersetzen. Audio LED – Grünes LED: Audio Signal vorhanden. F.A.Q.: Les séries Relay G50 et G90 Est-ce que je peux utiliser plusieurs émetteurs avec 1 récepteur? Oui, mais vous ne les pouvez pas utiliser en même temps sur le même canal. Le plus simple est de mettre transmetteur A sur canal 1 et transmetteur B sur canal 2. Si vous changez le canal sur le récepteur, de canal 1 sur canal 2, ca aussi change quel transmetteur vous pouvez entendre. Vous pouvez faire ca avec autant de récepteurs que vous avez canaux. Chaque transmetteur doit avoir un canal différent et vous changez le canal sur l'émetteur. Vous pouvez également mettre plusieurs transmetteurs sur le même canal et éteindre tous sauf pour l'un que vous voulez utiliser. Comme-ca, si vous changez les instruments, vous pouvez éteindre transmetteur A sur le premier instrument et allumer le transmetteur B du deuxième instrument. Attention, vérifiez que personne n'est en train d'utiliser des appareils Line 6 sur le même canal que vous. Est-ce que USB 3.0 crée des interférences dans la gamme de fréquences 2,4 GHz? Les câbles et périphériques USB 3.0 sont connus pour émettre des interférences de fréquence radio dans la bande 2,4 GHz, que cause une gamme et/ou performance des appareils 2.4 GHz réduite dans la proximité. (Y inclus sont les claviers ou souris sans fil, WiFi, etc.) Nous recommandons de placer le récepteur sans fil numérique au moins 2 mètres loin des appareils USB 3.0 et ses câbles. Voici un lien vers une étude réalisée par Intel au sujet de cette interférence: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html Est-ce que tous les transmetteurs et émetteurs Line 6 sans fil sont interchangeables? Oui, tous les transmetteurs et microphones sans fil de Line 6 fonctionnent avec des récepteurs Line 6. Si vous utilisez des systèmes XD-V or Relay, ce n'est aucun problème. Vous pouvez mélanger tous les récepteurs avec les transmetteurs et ca fonctionne à condition qu'ils correspondent au même canal. Est-ce que le transmetteur Relay G50/G90 est compatible avec le récepteur X2 (ou inversement)? Les deux systèmes travaillent en différents gammes de fréquence, donc ils ne sont pas interchangeables. Les appareils X2 et Relay peuvent être utilisés sur la même scène sans problème. (Ainsi que tous les autres systèmes sans fil analogiques) Où est-ce que je peux acheter les systèmes sans fil G50/G90? Vous les pouvez commander de n'importe quel distributeur autorisé. Où est-ce que je peux acheter des transmetteurs G50 (TBP12) ou récepteurs (RXS12) de remplacement? Transmetteurs et récepteurs individuels peuvent être commandés à partir de n'importe quel revendeur Line 6. Quels sont les spécifications d'alimentation Relay G50? 9V CC, 500mA, pin central négatif (2.1mm). Visitez le lien suivant pour plus d'informations concernant les alimentations: Power Supply and Amp Power F.A.Q. Comment est-ce que le récepteur G90 est allumé? Le Relay utilise un câble d'alimentation standard IEC. Est-ce que je peux utiliser un Voodoo Lab Pedal Power Plus 2 pour allumer le récepteur Relay G30? Oui mais vous devez utiliser le câble Voodoo Lab "doubler" et les deux sorties 5 et 6 du Pedal Power Plus sur la position "normal". Visitez le lien suivant pour plus d'informations sur les câbles "doubler" disponibles de Voodoo Lab: Câbles Voodoo Lab Quel câble est-ce que j'ai besoin pour la connexion guitar – transmetteur Relay TBP12? Le transmetteur Relay G50/G90 (TBP12) utilise un câble TA4f à ¼" (6.35mm). Quelle est le brochage pour câbler le connecteur TA4F? Broche 1 – Terre. Broche 2 – V+ Broche 3 – Signal Broche 4 – Z (laissez ouvert pour l'instrument)(court avec broche 3 pour connexion avec mirco) Combien de canaux est-ce que le G50/G90 a? Est-ce qu'ils partagent les canaux avec le système G30? Les G50/G90 ont 12 canaux et partagent les premières 6 avec le G30. Est-ce que je peux utiliser le TBP12 du G50 pour transmettre à un G90 ou G30? (ou inversement?) Oui, tous les transmetteurs Line 6 2.4GHz fonctionnent avec tous les récepteurs Line 6 2.4GHz. Quelles antennes fonctionnent avec le G50 et G90? G50: Antennes quart d'onde, connecteurs BNC détachables. G90: Antennes demi-onde. Les antennes peuvent-êtres détachés mais une connexion RG58-50 Ohm est nécessaire. Assurez-vous que les antennes ne sont pas dans un boîtier métallique ou touchent un métal. Mettez les antennes le plus haut possible. Combien de temps dure la paire de piles AA dans l'émetteur? 8 heures sur configuration "High Power" et 11 heures sur "Low Power". Si vous laissez le câble branché mais vous éteignez l'émetteur, il n'ya pas de vidange de la batterie. Comment est-ce que la jauge de batterie fonctionne? La jauge de batterie affiche des incréments de 20 minutes. Parfois, la jauge peut vous indiquer plus de batterie qu'en réalité disponible. C'est un problème connu avec les batteries alcalines. Est-ce que je peux utiliser des batteries rechargeables? Oui, mais les heurs et minutes sont calculés à partir des batteries alcalines, donc peuvent êtres inexactes. Quelques batteries rechargeables Certains rechargeables tandis étiquetées AA ne sont pas vraies AA et ne fonctionneront pas. Quelle est la différence entre la sortie Main et la sortie Tuner? La sortie Tuner fonctionne si le transmetteur est mis en sourdine. Quelle est la différence entre les systèmes G50/G90 et la série X2? Le Relay fonctionne sur la fréquence plus haute de 2.4GHz avec 12 canaux plutôt que 5. Est-ce que les antennes de récepteur RXR12 peuvent-être reliées? Jusqu'à 6 récepteurs peuvent être chaînés. Le dernier appareil dans la chaîne doit être "terminé" si vous relies les récepteurs. Je suis un harmoniciste et je voudrais bien utiliser le G50/G90 avec un micro harmonica (impédance et sorite haute). Sortie d'environ 3V à 4V. Est qu'il y aura du clipping ou de la distorsion du signal de sortie? Pas de problème ni avec l'impédance ou niveau d'entrée. Les transmetteurs Relay (TBP12) peuvent traiter des entrées de 6V. Comment est-ce que je peux enregistrer mon système Relay G30? Vous le pouvez enregistrer ici: Enregistrement Line 6. États LED: TBP12: LED Bleu: Batterie pleine. LED Rouge continu: Batterie faible. LED Rouge clignotant: Batterie très faible, changez la batterie. Audio LED: Vert: Signal audio.
  9. Relay G10TII Information Important Information About the G10TII Transmitter · The recommended charging temperature range of the G10TII transmitter is specified as 50° F to 86° F (10° C to 30° C). · The recommended operating temperature range of the G10TII transmitter is specified as 32° F to 122° F (0° C to 50° C). · Line 6 recommends charging the G10TII transmitter at least every 6 months, based on best practices for lithium-ion batteries. · G10TII LED behavior is as follows: G10TII Transmitter (Docked in G10/G10S Receiver, POD Go Wireless, Spider V amp or THR10II/THR30II/THR30IIA Wireless amp)* LED State Condition Red (slow flash) Charging, less than 30 minutes battery time remaining † Green (slow flash) Charging, more than 30 minutes battery time remaining Green (solid) Fully charged ‡ Dim Red/Pink, may turn off G10TII is not docked properly – Try un-docking and re-docking 5-10 times Red (three quick flashes, repeating) G10T charging has stopped due to exceeding supported temperature. Charging will resume after 5 minutes at 50° F to 86° F (10° C to 30° C) § Orange (solid) Docked and connected to Mac or PC, firmware update in progress Off Receiver not powered (transmitter enters sleep mode after 4 minutes if receiver power is disconnected) G10TII Transmitter (Connected to Instrument) LED State Condition Green (solid) Transmitting, more than 30 minutes battery time remaining Red (slow flash) Transmitting, less than 30 minutes battery time remaining Off Connected to an instrument but not enough battery to transmit ‖ or Removed from instrument *When the G10TII is docked in a receiver or Relay-Ready device, the G10TII LED initially indicates amber, red, or green, depending on its current battery state. This is followed by four flashes (red) as the device initializes. Once this completes, the G10TII LED proceeds to indicate its remaining battery time. † All values stated for amount of battery time remaining are approximate, and the exact amount of battery time remaining when an LED state is indicated may vary slightly between charges. When the G10TII flashes red, it may have up to 60 minutes of battery time remaining. ‡ If the G10TII reaches a full charge (solid green) and remains docked, the G10TII LED may eventually flash green again. This is expected behavior as the G10TII may discharge slightly after reaching a full charge, and its LED may then flash green until it again reaches a full charge. § If the charging lockout indication continues for over 10 minutes, please stop charging and try again in a cooler environment condition. ‖ When the G10TII has insufficient power to transmit, its LED may indicate a pattern of five quick red flashes when connected to an instrument and audio is detected. This is the expected behavior. G10 Receiver (G10TII Transmitter docked) LED State Condition White (solid) G10TII charging or fully charged White (flicker) System has auto-scanned and is changing its channel Red (flash) G10TII not docked properly – Try undocking and redocking Pink (pulse) Connected to Mac or PC, Line 6 Updater open Pink (solid) Connected to Mac or PC, firmware update in progress Off No power to receiver G10 Receiver (G10TII Transmitter un-docked) LED State Condition White (solid) G10TII transmission received, more than 30 minutes of runtime Red (slow flash) G10TII transmission received, less than 30 minutes of runtime White (pulse) Receiver on but no G10TII transmission received White (flicker) G10TII transmission dropout (RF mute) Off No power to receiver G10S Receiver (G10TII Transmitter docked) LED State Condition Battery LEDs Green (cycle 1-2-3) G10TII charging 3 Green LEDs (solid) G10TII fully charged RF LEDs 3 Red LEDs (solid) More than 75% interference (not usable) 2 Red LEDs (solid) 50% interference (usable, but only for short range) 1 Red LED (solid) 25% interference (usable, also indicates G10S power on) Battery LEDs Off RF LEDs On Battery LEDs – Off RF LEDs – Red (cycle 3-2-1) G10TII not docked properly – Try undocking and redocking Battery LEDs – Off RF LEDs – 3 Red LEDs (solid) Connected to Mac or PC, Line 6 Updater open All LEDs Off No power to receiver G10S Receiver (G10TII Transmitter un-docked) LED State Condition Battery LEDs 3 Green LEDs (solid) G10TII transmission received, more than 4.5 hours of runtime* 2 Green LEDs (solid) G10TII transmission received, more than 3 hours of runtime 1 Green LED (solid) G10TII transmission received, more than 1.5 hours of runtime 1 Red LED (solid) G10TII transmission received, more than 30 minutes of runtime 1 Red LED (flash) G10TII transmission received, less than 30 minutes of runtime RF LEDs 3 Green LEDs (solid) G10TII transmission received, good signal strength 2 Green LEDs (solid) G10TII transmission received, average signal strength 1 Green LED (solid) G10TII transmission received, poor signal strength 3 Red LEDs (solid) No G10TII transmission received, more than 75% interference (not usable) 2 Red LEDs (solid) No G10TII transmission received, 50% interference (usable, but only for short range) 1 Red LED (solid) No G10TII transmission received, 25% interference (usable, also indicates G10S power on) Red (cycle 3-2-1) G10S channel knob has been changed from its setting since G10TII was last docked All LEDs off No power to receiver * All values stated for amount of battery time remaining are approximate, and the exact amount of battery time remaining when a LED state is indicated on the G10S receiver may vary slightly between charges of the G10TII Transmitter.
  10. Click here to see the original POD Go FAQ. This FAQ will only focus on the wireless aspects of POD Go Wireless. Q: POD Go? POD Go Wireless? What’s the difference? A: POD Go Wireless has a built-in Relay® wireless receiver, ships with a Line 6 Relay G10TII wireless transmitter, charges the transmitter from its GUITAR IN jack, and includes a convenient storage well in the back panel for transport.* Other than that, they’re pretty much identical. So when you see “POD Go” in our materials, assume we also mean POD Go Wireless. In the manual, any POD Go Wireless-specific content will appear in blue text with a wireless icon. *NOTE: POD Go Wireless also supports the earlier Line 6 Relay G10T transmitter. A G10T transmitter should be updated to the latest firmware. Q: Where are the antennas? A: The diversity antennas positioned internally above the toe portion of the pedal receive the RF signal from the G10T transmitter. Avoid covering the antenna with cables, stickers, or other pedals. Q: Where should I store the transmitter when not in use? A: When not using or charging the included G10TII wireless transmitter, insert it into the storage well on the back of the unit below the toe portion of the pedal. Q: How do I charge the transmitter? A: Connect the included G10TII wireless transmitter to the GUITAR IN jack to charge its battery. IMPORTANT! If you turn off POD Go Wireless while a G10T or G10TII is in the Guitar/Charge port, it will remain in sleep mode and slowly lose charge over a week or so. Not a problem if you play POD Go every day, but a huge bummer when you come back from vacation. While in the storage well, the G10T/G10TII may retain its charge for a month or more, so it’s ready to go when you are. Q: How do I set up the wireless connection? A: POD Go Wireless has a built-in Relay® wireless receiver and includes a Relay G10TII wireless transmitter, so you can play untethered. 1. Anytime you bring POD Go Wireless into a new room or building, always connect the G10T transmitter to POD Go’s GUITAR IN jack. POD Go Wireless scans the environment to choose the optimal wireless channel and frequency. 2. Wait 10 to 15 seconds. 3. Remove the transmitter from POD Go Wireless and connect it to your guitar’s output. The G10TII’s battery lasts for 7 hours of playing time or about a month when inserted into the rear panel storage well. 4. Select the Input block on your POD Go Wireless device, press the lower knob, and choose either the “Guitar+Wireless” or “Wireless” as your input source. TIPS For best wireless performance, try to maintain line-of-sight between the G10T wireless transmitter and the antenna above the expression pedal. POD Go wireless has a line-of-sight range of up to 100 feet (30 meters). Facing away from POD Go Wireless can sometimes affect wireless performance, as your body can interfere with wireless signals. Also avoid covering the antenna with cables, other pedals, or small woodland creatures. Maintain a safe distance (at least 10 feet/3 meters, but preferably more) from 2.4GHz WiFi routers. If a WiFi router must be in your performance environment, switch it to operate at 5GHz, if possible. Q: How do I read the Transmitter Battery and Signal Indicators? A: At the top left of the LCD screen, POD Go Wireless always displays two icons: the Battery Life indicator and either the RF Quality indicator, or the Charging or Syncing icon, as pictured and described below. The first time POD Go Wireless is powered on, the battery outline is empty and the RF bars display as dimmed, indicating no transmitter can be found (see No Tx Found below). 1. Connect G10T to POD Go Wireless’ GUITAR IN jack. While the transmitter is syncing, a sync icon (circular arrows) is displayed. Once syncing is complete, while the transmitter is connected to the GUITAR IN jack, a blue charging icon (lightning bolt) is displayed. When fully charged, the battery icon is displayed with all three battery bars bright green. NOTE: Any time you move POD Go Wireless into a new environment, connect the G10T to its GUITAR IN jack to perform a sync. Sync scans the frequency spectrum and automatically chooses the optimal wireless channel. You may also manually select the wireless channel from the Global Settings > Wireless menu. 2. Once sufficiently charged, remove the transmitter from the GUITAR IN jack and connect to your guitar’s output. POD Go Wireless continues to show the transmitter battery life indicator as well as a 3-bar RF signal strength indicator to its right. When no active transmitter is detected, an “empty” battery and dim RF bars are shown (see No Tx Found below). The remaining battery time and RF signal strength values are indicated as described below: Battery Life Indicator > 4.5 hours - Full green battery 3 hours-4.5 hours - 2/3 full green battery 1.5 hours-3 hours - 1/3 full green battery 30 mins-1.5 hours - 1/3 full red battery < 30 mins. - 1/3 full flashing red battery No Tx Found - Empty battery RF Indicator RF High - Three bars RF Medium - Two bars RF Low - One bar No Tx Found - Zero bars IMPORTANT! The G10T transmitter’s LED lights green when powered on and the battery has more than 30 minutes left. If the battery has less than 30 minutes left, the LED flashes red. To extend battery life, sleep mode is activated after a period of 4 minutes where no audio input is detected. The transmitter “wakes up” when the instrument is played. Q: How do I use multiple POD Go Wireless systems? A: Up to four POD Go Wireless and/or standalone Line 6 Relay wireless systems can be used on the same stage. However, care should be taken to ensure all systems are set up properly: 1. For the first system, connect the G10T transmitter to the POD Go Wireless GUITAR IN jack and wait 10 to 15 seconds. Make sure the transmitter’s LED lights green. 2. Connect the transmitter to your guitar’s output. 3. Before the first transmitter goes to sleep (after 4 minutes of no audio input), repeat the above steps 1 and 2 for any additional POD Go Wireless systems. Each system’s scanning procedure works around other active wireless channels to help ensure high quality performance for all systems. Q: How do I set up the Input and Output blocks? A: The Input and Output blocks appear at the far left and right of your signal flow. The Input and Output block settings are saved per preset. From Edit view, turn the Upper Knob to select the Input block and then turn the Lower Knob to change the input. Guitar+Wireless: POD Go Wireless users should choose Guitar+Wireless so both the GUITAR IN and G10T wireless transmitter are active Guitar: Choose this option to receive input only from the 1/4" GUITAR IN Wireless: (POD Go Wireless) Choose this Wireless option to receive input only from the G10T wireless transmitter USB 3/4: USB inputs 3/4 can be used for re-amping, or processing tracks from your Mac or Windows DAW software. NOTE: POD Go also receives input from USB 1/2, but it’s dedicated for monitoring audio from your computer (or iPad) and bypasses all processing blocks. As such, USB 1/2 is not available as an input block source. TIP: POD Go Wireless users can choose Guitar for some presets and Wireless for others, effectively turning the Input block into an input switcher. Q: How do I set the Wireless Global Settings? A: Knob 1 controls the "RF Channel" parameter. This sets the radio frequency channel for the POD Go Wireless RELAY system. Normally, this should be set to “Auto,” where POD Go Wireless automatically picks the RF channel for the most reliable performance. Knob 2 controls the "Cable Tone" parameter. Players who traditionally use long guitar cables may find the POD Go Wireless RELAY system to sound too pristine. Cable Tone lets you replicate the unique treble roll-off that guitar cables naturally create. Choose “Off” for the widest possible frequency response, 10 feet (3 meters), or 30 feet (9 meters). Knob 3 controls the "Wireless Gain" parameter. This sets the overall gain of the wireless guitar signal. Normally, this should be left at 0.0dB, but if your wireless signal appears notably louder or softer than your other guitars, adjust to taste. Q: Will POD Go Wireless work with other Relay transmitters? A: It was not designed to, and we do not condone doing so. Even if it does work, it may perform unreliably. Q: I have presets from the original POD Go. Will I have any issues with using them with POD Go Wireless? A: The files are compatible. One thing to note is that POD Go Wireless converts "Guitar" input blocks from presets saved on the original POD Go to "Guitar+Wireless" Input blocks automatically when they are imported to the wireless SKU. So that shouldn't be an issue.
  11. I have the P180 AND the P360 paddles for my XD-V75 systems. I ALREADY KNOW that I can use either set of paddles with the XD-V75 AND I can even use the XD-AD8 to use ONE set of paddles for up to 8 XD-V75 systems. What I am asking about is COMBINING both sets of paddles to 2 XD-V75 (rackmounted side-by-side in my rig). I KNOW (and already have configured) the 2 XD-V75s can share the antenna inputs. I am looking for a 2.4Ghz antenna combiner with BNC connectors, so I can use all 4 paddles together. The P180s for on stage and the P360s for audience coverage. Has anyone tried this? Issues with doing this? Thank you!
  12. Hi to whomever I am speaking with, I would REALLY appreciate any help on this... So I have used my Line 6 G75 Wireless Guitar System a few times over the last six months but then when I went to use it last month it lost signal between the transmitter and the receiver. I switched it off and on, auto scanned it and reset the scene for my bass which worked and then it played fine again for several times after that. But then this problem happened a few times until ultimately the system stopped recognising the transmitter saying 'NO Tx!' permanently. I gathered that it must be due a firmware update so I loaded version 1.05 to my RT516 unit and version 1.03 to my TB516 G which I believe are the most recent updates, still the same problem. I have gone through and tried auto scanning but it just comes up 'No Tx found', I have also tried manually setting the transmitter in accordance with the G75 manual to no avail. I have carried out a factory reset, loaded previous firmware's and shouted at it all to no avail. It is currently set back to versions 1.05 and 1.03 and as it was when I first opened it in regards to settings. I love the kit when its working but I need to have confidence in it, I am hoping someone here may have had something similar and can assist me?! Any help is hugely appreciated. Kind Regards, Ash
  13. I'd like to know if there's someway to connect my helix lt to my pc wirelessly? The usb cable is becoming a pain to deal with....I was wondering if there were any hardware solutions to extend usb wirelessly? Cheers
  14. I have a spider v 240hc. Looking at a Harley Benton 212 cabinet. Cab specs are 120w @ 8ohn mono and 60w @ 16ohm stereo. Can I safely plug in without damaging my amp? I am almost certain it ok but want to double check. Really don't want a 412 at this time. Also if it does hook up will or how much power/quality will I lose? side question. Is the wireless system ok with active pu?
  15. What goes wrong inside a G10S when it will work from a USB source but not the factory 9V supply... I checked the supply with a volt meter and it seems ok. Only had the unit a few months...
  16. Hi all, I was 99% settled on selling off my amp, cab and pedalboard in favour of a Helix, until I realised I would still want to use my G30 wireless system. I'm currently using a TC Electronic G System, which has four super convenient 9v power outputs for powering pedals in it's various loops. I was frankly amazed at what looks like a huge oversight in the design of the Helix, that while it is designed to be an "all-in-one" solution it does have the option to loop in other pedals yet has no solution to provide power to them. I'm really obsessive about cable management and having everything as neat and tidy as possible on my pedalboards, so the absolute last thing I am willing to do is have some ugly power strip on the back of a pedalboard not only wasting space but also cluttering it up just for the sake of 1 9v power adapter for my wireless. Does anyone know of a reasonably priced product which might offer a tidy and effective power solution to both the 240v Helix requirement, and a single 9v requirement?? Huge thanks in advance!!! Liam
  17. Just wondering if anyone has tried to use the headphone out connected to a bluetooth transmitter like this: Amazon.com: Bluetooth Tranismitter Then, simply pair it up to your Bluetooth headphones and you have a cheap on-stage/rehearsal in ear monitor for yourself? Would that work?!? **EDIT** I found a solution that works for me, see my detailed reply below
  18. Icon G-board for HX STOMP (iPhone version) https://gum.co/ALVVU New Premium MIDI Layout for MIDI DESIGNER PRO 2 ( IOS App, sold separately) - Works as an enterely wireless MIDI controller (using the yamaha or the Quicco MIDI-BT wireless adapter) - Also works with USB cable (using an Apple CCK connected to the HX STOMP USB) - Provides full hardware support for the iCon G-Board (MIDI footcontroller), including the eight onboard LEDs. Requires the Apple CCK USB3 and the Wireless MIDI-BT device to work. Main Screen: - Covers almost all HX STOMP MIDI implementation. (the "Play Once" button was deliberately ommited in this version) - Adds memory for 8 banks (A-H) of 4 Presets. (no more running correlative presets Up and Down!) Performance Screen: - Once you have set your banks in the main screen, load this Performance view to have a real Head Up Display for your HX STOMP. Includes the most relevant performance controls and a funny icon for each Bank! Icon G-Board: - Upper row: FS 1-4 (selectable Presets on the iPhone Screen) X 8 Banks (A-H) 1/4 LED active - Lower row: Snapshots 1-3. Super FS momentary footswitch (selectable FS 1-5 function) 1/3 LED active + 1 momentary
  19. I have been experiencing connection issues in the past using the USB dongles. I have decided to scrap the USB dongles all together. I have the apple usb adapter and it works perfectly. I have both the apple airport express and a linksys router ( I have 2 M20D's, 1 for our church and one for an install I am doing). I have tested both the airport express and the linksys and I can connect to them with the ipad with no issues and its much faster than the USB. My question is, can I use this setup to connect the M20D to my existing wireless network? And if so, can you explain how to do it either router, the Apple Airport Express and a Cisco Linksys WRT110? With my install, I'd rather not have to instruct them to switch wireless networks when trying to connect to the M20D. It is being installed in a township building in their main meeting space. I'd prefer to use the Linksys in the township building and the Airport Express in our church. Any help would be appreciated! B)
  20. Alright, this is a bit of a stretch but I'm curious what the people here have to suggest. Here's my situation : I use a G55 right now. I managed to custom made fit it under my pedalboard with antennas hanging out. I got the G55 because I compared the system to the G50 and the G70. Both the 50 and 70 had less operating range than the 55 in the same building with the same conditions, etc. I play in different regions in the world (that's why I went with 2.4Ghz) mainly North America, Europe, Japan. The main act is somekind of circus performance, sometimes I need a good clean 100' of operating range for my performance. I'm often far from my pedalboard or suspended in the air. Other gigs are more standard but I still run in the crowd and around changing rooms away from my gear. Both the distance or bodies and walls contribute to a potential dropout I know that. The WiFi strength sometimes are through the roofs everywhere and the channels are almost all filled. But even if there is a lot of potential interference. When I perform under 15-20' range from the antennas, everything is 100% fine. My concern is if I add something like an BNC extension cable between the antenna and the G55 in troublesome venues and I temporarily tape the antenna as close as I can to my performance would it be a savior ? Just to reduce the distance and get away from other wifi stuff An extension like this : https://www.itfactory.ca/mmnox-ex03s-3-meter-antenna-extension-cable-black?gclid=Cj0KCQjwjOrtBRCcARIsAEq4rW6KmiEaao97SFHuFHkW0lyZHPL6Vm1fT4L-xmwLIVSyVHjYI5RcjacaAqmWEALw_wcB#fo_c=79&fo_k=c1421b29a422f7162abc66fe28cbd452&fo_s=gplaca Would it work ? I don't know the electrical voltages that goes in these antennas but adding a resistance (the cable) could affect the functionality ? Also, would I need to do this to both antennas ?
  21. Français Deutsch 日本語 Below is a chart of the carrier frequencies for each channel in RF1 and RF2 mode. There are 2 frequencies in RF2 mode, because each channel has 2 carrier frequencies per channel. At the same time, each channel in RF1 mode has 4 carrier frequencies per channel. Line 6 Wireless Modes RF2 & RF1 The new V75, 55 and 35 default to RF2 mode, but include the ability to be switched into RF1 mode. You cannot use RF2 mode in the presence of any older Line 6 2.4G wireless (including Relay) in the same venue. If you try you will likely get failures in both the old and new units. Just say no! You can check using the RF scan feature included in XD-V75 receivers. You must either flash older models to the newer V2.0 firmware (and you must have access to a V75 receiver and do this via Monkey) or you can shift the newer models (or any that have been flashed with V2.0) into RF1 mode. If an XD-V75 unit is being added to a setup that already includes any devices running in RF1 mode, the XD-V75 can be used to update the older devices to run RF2 mode by using an internet-connected computer attached to the XD-V75's USB port. See the Firmware Updating Procedure section for more information. Alternatively, the XD-V75 transmitters can be set up to operate in RF1 mode if it is necessary to use the transmitters with older Line 6 receivers. Note: Relay G30 and G50 Receivers that have been updated to V2.0 firmware will *follow* the RF Mode that the corresponding G30 or G50 Transmitter is set to. Note: Encryption only works in RF2 mode. Please also note that the RF Performance feature (the sixth page on the XD-V75 receiver) is only functional when the Tx is in RF2 mode. To Set The THH12 Or TBP12 Transmitters (Including Relay G50/90): Enter Setup mode to display the current channel While holding down the SELECT button, press and release the ON/MUTE button on the THH12 or VALUE button on the TBP12, then release the SELECT button. The display will briefly show [XD-V75 RF1] or [XD-V75 RF2] to indicate whether it is operating in the old or new mode, respectively. This setting is retained when powering off, so as a reminder the display will also show this indication [RF1 or RF2] each time power is turned on. The XD-V75 receiver will display a [To] on the far right of the display to indicate while communicating with a RF1 software transmitter. [Tx] indicates units operating in RF2 mode. They must ALL be the same. The XD-V35 system ships set to the new dual frequency RF2 mode. To use an XD-V35 version transmitter with an earlier generation XD-V30 receiver (RF1 mode), you must change the transmitter from RF2 mode to RF1 mode. The method differs slightly between the handheld and beltpack. Setting THH06 And TBP06 Transmitters (Including G30) THH06 HandheldTransmitter Turn the transmitter off. Press and hold the channel SELECT button. While holding the SELECT button, press and hold the power ON button. The blue LED over channel 1 will flash three times to indicate that the transmitter is in the RF1 mode. To revert to the RF2 mode, repeat the above steps; the blue LED over channel 2 will flash three times when the transmitter is in this mode. TBP06 Beltpack Transmitter With transmitter off, set the Channel Select slide switch to channel 6. Turn on the transmitter. Immediately after the blue light blinks, slide the Channel Select switch completely left to channel 1 and back to channel 6. Do this 3 times total. This process must be completed within three seconds of turning on the transmitter. The blue LED will flash once to indicate that the transmitter is now in the 4-frequency transmission mode. To revert to RF2 transmission mode, repeat the above steps; the blue LED will flash twice when the transmitter is in this mode. Note: It is IMPORTANT to note that once you shift (in either direction) the transmitters will only remember the change if you power cycle the transmitter. Just turn it off with the power switch and then back on. If you were to pop a battery before doing this then it will revert back to the last "saved" mode. Line 6 Wireless RF1 und RF2: Frequenzmodus wechseln Line 6 Wireless Modus RF2 & RF1 Die neuen Line 6 Wireless Sender V75, 55 und 35 werden im RF2-Modus ausgeliefert, sie können aber auch in den RF1-Modus umgeschaltet werden. Der RF2-Modus kann nicht benutzt werden, wenn ältere Line 6 2.4G Wireless-Geräte (inklusive Relay) am gleichen Ort verwendet werden, weil das zu Störungen bei beiden Gerätetypen führen kann. Welcher Modus gerade eingeschaltet ist, können Sie herausfinden, indem Sie die eingebaute Frequenzen-Scan-Funktion Ihres XD-V75-Empfängers benutzen.Um das Problem zu beheben, müssen sie entweder die neuere V2.0-Firmware auf ihre älteren Geräte aufspielen (dazu brauchen Sie Zugang zu einem V75-Empfänger und Monkey), oder sie schalten die neueren Modelle (beziehungsweise jedes Modell, auf dem die V2.0-Firmware läuft) in den RF1-Modus um.Wenn ein XD-V75-Gerät zu einem Setup hinzugefügt wird, das schon Geräte enthält, die im RF1-Modus laufen, kann das XD-V75 benutzt werden, um die älteren Geräte zu aktualisieren. Dazu brauchen Sie einen Computer mit Internetverbindung, der an den USB-Port des XD-V75 angeschlossen wird. Weitere Informationen dazu finden Sie in der Sektion über Firmware-Aktualisierung. Alternativ können Sie das Setup in den RF-1-Modus umschalten, um die Sender mit älteren Line-6-Empfängern zu verwenden. Bitte beachten Sie: Relay G30- und G50-Empfänger, die auf die V2.0-Firmware aktualisiert wurden, „folgen“ automatisch derjenigen Frequenz, auf die der dazugehörige G30- oder G50-Empfänger eingestellt wurde. Einstellen des THH12 oder TBP12 Senders (Inklusive Relay G50/90): Gehen Sie in den Setup-Modus, um den aktuellen Kanal anzuzeigen. Halten Sie den SELECT-Knopf gedrückt, drücken Sie dann den ON/MUTE-Knopf (beim THH12) beziehungsweise den VALUE-Knopf (beim TBP12) und lassen Sie ihn wieder los. Das Display wird kurz [XD-V75 RF1] oder [XD-V75 RF2] anzeigen, so können Sie sehen, ob der Transmitter im alten oder neuen Modus läuft. Die Einstellung wird beibehalten, wenn Sie das Gerät ausschalten. Zur Erinnerung zeigt das Display den jeweiligen Modus [RF1 oder RF2] beim Einschalten des Geräts kurz an. Der XD-V75-Receiver zeigt an der äußersten rechten Seite [To] an, wenn das Gerät mit einem RF1-Transmitter kommuniziert. [Tx] bedeutet, dass die Geräte im RF2-Modus arbeiten. Damit die verschiedenen Sender- Empfänger Generationen zusammen störungsfrei arbeiten müssen ALLE Geräte im gleichen Modus arbeiten. Bedeutet das Vorhandensein eines Senders im RF1 modus.Bedeutet das Vorhandensein eines Senders im RF2 modus. Das XD-V35-System ist bei der Auslieferung auf den neuen Dual-Frequenz-Modus RF2 eingestellt. Um einen XD-V35-Sender mit einem XD-V30-Empfänger der früheren Generation (RF1-Modus) zu verwenden, müssen Sie den Sender von RF2 auf RF1 umschalten. Die Vorgehensweise ist etwas unterschiedlich, je nachdem, ob Sie das Mikrofon- oder das Beltpack-Gerät verwenden. Einstellen des THH06 und TBP06 Transmitters (Inklusive G30) THH06 Handheld-Transmitter Schalten Sie den Transmitter aus. Halten Sie den Kanal-Select-Knopf gedrückt. Während Sie den Select-Knopf gedrückt halten, drücken Sie den Power/Ein-Knopf und halten Sie diesen ebenfalls gedrückt. Die blaue LED über Kanal 1 leuchtet dreimal kurz auf, um anzuzeigen, dass der Transmitter jetzt im RF1-Modus ist. Um in den RF2-Modus zurückzukehren, wiederholen Sie die oben genannten Schritte; die blaue LED über Kanal 2 leuchtet dreimal kurz auf, um anzuzeigen, dass der Transmitter im RF2-Modus ist. TBP06 Beltpack-Transmitter Bei ausgeschaltetem Transmitter den Schieberegler zur Kanalauswahl auf Kanal 6 stellen. Transmitter einschalten. Den Schieberegler sofort nach dem Blinken der blauen LED insgesamt dreimal auf Kanal 1 stellen, zurück auf 6 und wieder auf Kanal 1 schieben. (nicht vergessen: das muss dreimal geschehen) die Sequenz von 6 startend ist also : 6-1-6-1-6 Dieser Prozess muss nach Anschalten des Senders innerhalb von drei Sekunden geschehen. Die blaue LED blinkt einmal, um anzuzeigen, dass der Sender jetzt im RF1 Modus ist, Sie blinkt zweimal wenn man im RF2 Modus ist (auch immer nach Anschalten Status sichtbar) Um in den RF2-Ãœbertragungsmodus zurückzukehren, wiederholen Sie die oben genannten Schritte. Die blaue LED blinkt dann zweimal auf, wenn der Sender im RF2-Modus ist. Wichtig: Bitte beachten Sie, dass das Gerät den soeben eingestellten Modus (egal in welche Richtung) nur beibehält, wenn Sie das Gerät nach dem Wechsel kurz aus- und wieder einschalten. Dadurch wird der aktuell eingestellte Modus gespeichert. Wenn sie vorher eine Batterie eingelegt haben, springt das Gerät zurück zum zuletzt gespeicherten Modus. Line 6 sans fil RF1 et RF2: Changement de modes Les modes de transmission RF2&RF1 Line6 Les nouveaux systèmes sans fil V75, 55 et 35 utilisent le nouveau mode de transmission RF2 par défaut, mais possèdent la possibilité de changer en mode RF1.Il n’est pas possible d’utiliser des appareils qui utilisent le mode RF2 s’il y a des anciens appareils RF1(V70 our Relay) sur la même scène ou dans le même bâtimentSi vous l’essayez, vous allez très probablement voir des erreurs de communication sur les anciens et nouveaux systèmes. Il suffit de ne pas les combiner ! Vous pouvez vérifier la présence d’émetteurs RF1 /FR2 en utilisant la fonction « CHANNEL SCAN » RF dans les récepteurs XD-V75. Vous devez soit mettre a jour les anciens modèles vers la version 2.0 ou vous pouvez changer les modèles déjà équipés de la version 2.0 en RF mode 1. Pour mettre à jour un ancien modèle, vous avez besoin d’un récepteur XDV75, un ordinateur et le logiciel Monkey. Si une XD-V75 est ajouté à une installation qui comprend déjà des appareils fonctionnant en mode RF1, le XD-V75 peut être utilisé pour mettre à jour les appareils plus anciens vers RF2 mode.Pour mettre à jour les modèles précédents, vous devrez avoir accès à l'Internet et une connexion USB entre le XD-V75 à l'ordinateur Voir la section Mise à jour ‘’Firmware Procedure’’ pour de plus amples renseignements. Alternativement, les émetteurs XD-V75 peut être configuré en mode de RF1 s'il est nécessaire d'utiliser des émetteurs avec les anciens Line 6 récepteurs. Remarque : Les récepteurs Relay G30 et G50 qui ont été mis à jour avec le firmware V2.0 suivent automatiquement le mode RF de l’émetteur correspondant. Pour changer le mode RF des émetteurs THH12TBP12et G50/90: Entrez en mode de configuration pour afficher le canal actuel Maintenez le bouton SELECT et pressez et relâchez le bouton ON / MUTE ou la touche VALUE sur le TBP12. L'écran indiqué brièvement [XD-V75 RF1] ou [XD-V75 RF2] pour vous indiquer le mode actif. Également quand vous mettez l’émetteur en marche.Ce réglage est conservé lorsque vous éteignez l’émetteur. Le mode actif [RF1 ou RF2] s’indique chaque fois que l'appareil est allumé. Le récepteur XD-V75 affichera une Icône ( To) à la droite de l'écran pour indiquer le mode RF2, ( Tx)s’indique que l récepteur est en communication avec un émetteur dans mode RF1. Ils doivent tous être les mêmes.montre la présence d’un émetteur RF1montre la présence d’un émetteur RF2 Le système XD-V35 est déjà réglé à la nouvelle fréquence RF2.Pour utiliser un émetteur XD-V35 avec un récepteurXD-V30 d’ancienne génération RF1 vous devez changer l'émetteur de RF2 mode RF1. La méthode diffère légèrement entre le modèle micro THH06 et le modèle ceinture TBP06 (et G30). Pour changer le mode RF des émetteurs THH06TBP06et G30 THH06 émetteur micro : éteignez l'émetteur. appuyez et maintenez enfoncé le bouton SELECT canal. tout en maintenant la touche SELECT, appuyez et maintenez le bouton d'alimentation. Le LED bleu sur le canal 1 clignote trois fois pour indiquer que l'émetteur est en mode RF1. pour revenir en mode RF2, répétez les étapes ci-dessus, le LED bleu sur le canal 2 clignote trois fois lorsque l'émetteur est dans ce mode. TBP06 émetteur ceinture : mettez le sélecteur de canal sur 6. éteignez l'émetteur. allumez l'émetteur et changez immédiatement après vous voyez la DEL bleu le canal vers 1, vers 6 et vers 1. Répétez ca TROIS fois (la séquence est donc 6-1-6-1-6 (commencez sur 6) ce processus doit être achevé dans les trois secondes après la mise sous tension de l'émetteur. le LED bleu clignote une fois pour indiquer que l'émetteur est maintenant dans le mode de transmission RF1. Pour revenir en mode RF2, répétez les étapes ci-dessus le LED bleu clignote deux fois lorsque l'émetteur est dans ce mode. Remarque: Pour sauvegarder le changement de mode RF dans l’émetteur, il vous suffit de l’éteindre et de le rallumer avec avec le commutateur ON/OFF.Si vous enlevez les piles, l’émetteur se met dans le dernier mode RF saufgardé. Line 6 ワイヤレス・モードRF2ã�¨RF1ã�«ã�¤ã�„ã�¦ æ–° ã�—ã�„XD-V75ã€�V55ã€�V35ã�®åˆ�期設定ã�¯RF2モードã�§ã�™ã�Œã€�RF1モードã�¸åˆ‡ã‚Šæ›¿ã�ˆã‚‹ã�“ã�¨ã‚‚å�¯èƒ½ã�«ã�ªã�£ã�¦ã�„ã�¾ã�™ã€‚従æ�¥ã�®Line 6 2.4 GHzワイヤレス (Relayã‚’å�«ã‚€) ã�¨å�Œã�˜ä¼šå ´å†…ã�§ã€�å�Œæ™‚ã�«RF2モードを使ã�†ã�“ã�¨ã�¯ã�§ã��ã�¾ã�›ã‚“。もã�—è¡Œã�ªã�£ã�Ÿå ´å�ˆã�¯ä¸¡æ–¹ã�®ãƒ¦ãƒ‹ãƒƒãƒˆã�§å•�é¡Œã�Œèµ·ã�“ã‚‹å�¯èƒ½æ€§ã�Œã�‚ã‚Šã�¾ã�™ã�®ã�§ã€�絶対ã�«è¡Œã‚�ã�ªã�„よã�† ã�«ã�—ã�¦ã��ã� ã�•ã�„。ã�©ã�®ãƒ¢ãƒ¼ãƒ‰ã�Œä½¿ã‚�ã‚Œã�¦ã�„ã‚‹ã�‹ã�¯ã€�XD-V75ã�®ãƒ¬ã‚·ãƒ¼ãƒ�ーã�«æ�­è¼‰ã�•ã‚Œã�ŸRFスキャン機能を使ã�£ã�¦ãƒ�ェックã�™ã‚‹ã�“ã�¨ã�Œå�¯èƒ½ã�§ã�™ã€‚ å•�題を解決ã�™ã‚‹ã�«ã�¯ã€�従æ�¥ã�®ãƒ¢ãƒ‡ãƒ«ã‚’æ–°ã�—ã�„V2.0ファームウェアã�«æ›¸ã��æ�›ã�ˆã‚‹ã�‹ (Monkeyを使ã�£ã�¦æ›¸ã��æ�›ã�ˆã‚’è¡Œã�†ã�«ã�¯XD-V75レシーãƒ�ーを使ã�†å¿…è¦�ã�Œã�‚ã‚Šã�¾ã�™)ã€�æ–°ã�—ã�„モデル (ã�‚ã‚‹ã�„ã�¯V2.0ã�¸ã‚¢ãƒƒãƒ—デートã�•ã‚Œã�Ÿãƒ¢ãƒ‡ãƒ«) ã‚’RF1モードã�«ã‚·ãƒ•ãƒˆã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ RF1 モードã�®ãƒ‡ã‚£ãƒ�イスをå�«ã‚€ã‚»ãƒƒãƒˆã‚¢ãƒƒãƒ—ã�¸XD-V75ãƒ¦ãƒ‹ãƒƒãƒˆã‚’è¿½åŠ ã�—ã�Ÿå ´å�ˆã€�ã��ã�®XD-V75を使ã�£ã�¦ä»¥å‰�ã�®ãƒ‡ã‚£ãƒ�イスをアップデートã�§ã��ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ã��ã�®éš› ã�¯XD-V75ã�®USBãƒ�ートã�¸ã€�インターãƒ�ット接続ã�—ã�Ÿã‚³ãƒ³ãƒ”ューターを接続ã�—ã�¦è¡Œã�„ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ファームウェア・アップデートã�®æ–¹æ³•ã�¯ã€�XD-V75ã�®è£½å“� ページã�®ãƒªã‚½ãƒ¼ã‚¹ã‚¿ãƒ–ã�«ç”¨æ„�ã�•ã‚Œã�¦ã�„ã‚‹PDFファイルをã�”覧ã��ã� ã�•ã�„。ã�ªã�Šã€�XD-V75ã�®ãƒˆãƒ©ãƒ³ã‚¹ãƒŸãƒƒã‚¿ãƒ¼ã‚’以å‰�ã�®Line 6レシーãƒ�ーã�§ä½¿ç”¨ã�™ã‚‹å¿…è¦�ã�Œã�‚ã‚‹å ´å�ˆã�¯ã€�ã��ã�®ãƒˆãƒ©ãƒ³ã‚¹ãƒŸãƒƒã‚¿ãƒ¼ã‚’RF1ã�«è¨­å®šã�™ã‚‹ã�“ã�¨ã‚‚ã�§ã��ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ 注æ„�: V2.0ファームウェアã�«ã‚¢ãƒƒãƒ—デートã�•ã‚Œã�ŸRelay G30ã‚„G50ã�®ãƒ¬ã‚·ãƒ¼ãƒ�ーã�¯ã€�対応ã�™ã‚‹G30ã‚„G50ã�®ãƒˆãƒ©ãƒ³ã‚¹ãƒŸãƒƒã‚¿ãƒ¼ã�§è¨­å®šã�•ã‚Œã�ŸRFモードã�«å¾“ã�„ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ THH12ã€�TBP12トランスミッターã�®è¨­å®šæ–¹æ³• (Relay G50/90ã‚’å�«ã‚€): Setupモードã�«å…¥ã�£ã�¦ç�¾åœ¨ã�®ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ルを表示ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ SELECT ボタンを押ã�—ã�ªã�Œã‚‰ã€�THH12ã�®ON/MUTEボタンã€�ã‚‚ã�—ã��ã�¯TBP12ã�®VALUEボタンを一度押ã�—ã�¦ã€�離ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚æ–°æ—§ã�©ã�¡ã‚‰ã�®ãƒ¢ãƒ¼ãƒ‰ã�§å‹•ä½œã�—ã�¦ã�„ ã‚‹ã�‹ã�Œãƒ‡ã‚£ã‚¹ãƒ—レイ上ã�« [XD-V75 RF1] ã�¾ã�Ÿã�¯ [XD-V75 RF2] ã�®å½¢ã�§è¡¨ç¤ºã�•ã‚Œã�¾ã�™ã€‚å�Œã�˜ã�“ã�¨ã‚’ç¹°ã‚Šè¿”ã�™ã�¨åˆ¥ã�®ãƒ¢ãƒ¼ãƒ‰ã�«åˆ‡ã‚Šæ›¿ã‚�ã‚Šã�¾ã�™ã€‚ã�“ã�®è¨­å®šã�¯é›»æº�オフ時ã�«ã‚‚維æŒ�ã�•ã‚Œã€�é›»æº�投入時ã�« [RF1] ã�¾ã�Ÿã�¯ [RF2] ã�¨è¡¨ç¤ºã�•ã‚Œã�¾ã�™ã€‚XD-V75レシーãƒ�ーã�§ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル・スキャンを行ã�†ã�¨ã€�RF1ソフトウェアã�®ãƒˆãƒ©ãƒ³ã‚¹ãƒŸãƒƒã‚¿ãƒ¼ã�¨ã‚³ãƒŸãƒ¥ãƒ‹ã‚±ãƒ¼ã‚·ãƒ§ãƒ³ã�—ã�¦ã�„ã‚‹éš›ã�«ã�¯ãƒ‡ã‚£ スプレイ内ã�®ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル番å�·ã�®ä¸Šã�« [To] ã�Œè¡¨ç¤ºã�•ã‚Œã�¾ã�™ã€‚RF2モードã�§å‹•ä½œã�—ã�¦ã�„るユニットã�®å ´å�ˆã�¯ [Tx] ã�Œè¡¨ç¤ºã�•ã‚Œã�¾ã�™ã€‚複数ã�®ãƒ¦ãƒ‹ãƒƒãƒˆã‚’使用ã�—ã�¦ã�„ã‚‹å ´å�ˆã�¯ã€�ã�©ã�¡ã‚‰ã�‹ä¸€æ–¹ã�«å…¨ãƒ¦ãƒ‹ãƒƒãƒˆã‚’統一ã�™ã‚‹å¿…è¦�ã�Œã�‚ã‚Šã�¾ã�™ã€‚ XD- V35システムã�¯æ–°ã�—ã�„2周波数 (デュアルフリケンシー) æ–¹å¼�ã�®RF2モードã�«è¨­å®šã�•ã‚Œã�ŸçŠ¶æ…‹ã�§å‡ºè�·ã�•ã‚Œã�¦ã�„ã�¾ã�™ã€‚XD-V35ã�®ãƒˆãƒ©ãƒ³ã‚¹ãƒŸãƒƒã‚¿ãƒ¼ã‚’å‰�世代ã�®XD-V30レシーãƒ�ー (RF1モード) ã�§ä½¿ç”¨ã�™ã‚‹å ´å�ˆã�«ã�¯ã€�トランスミッターをRF2モードã�‹ã‚‰RF1モードã�¸åˆ‡ã‚Šæ›¿ã�ˆã‚‹å¿…è¦�ã�Œã�‚ã‚Šã�¾ã�™ã€‚ã��ã�®æ–¹æ³•ã�¯ãƒ�ンドヘルドã�¨ãƒ™ãƒ«ãƒˆãƒ‘ックã�§å°‘ã�—ç•°ã�ªã�£ã�¦ ã�„ã�¾ã�™ã€‚THH06ã€�TBP06トランスミッターã�®è¨­å®šæ–¹æ³• (G30ã‚’å�«ã‚€): THH06ãƒ�ンドヘルド・トランスミッター トランスミッターã�®é›»æº�を切りã�¾ã�™ã€‚ ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ルã�®SELECTボタンを押ã�—ã�Ÿã�¾ã�¾ã�«ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ ã��ã�®ã�¾ã�¾ã�®çŠ¶æ…‹ã�§ã€�é›»æº�ã�®ONボタンを押ã�—続ã�‘ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル1ã�®ä¸Šã�«ã�‚ã‚‹é�’ã�„LEDã�Œ3回点滅ã�—ã�¦ã€�トランスミッターã�ŒRF1モードã�«ã�ªã�£ã�Ÿã�“ã�¨ã‚’示ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ RF2モードã�«æˆ»ã�™ã�«ã�¯ã€�å�Œã�˜ãƒ—ロセスを繰り返ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚モードã�Œå¤‰ã‚�ã‚‹ã�¨ã€�ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル2ã�®ä¸Šã�«ã�‚ã‚‹é�’ã�„LEDã�Œ3回点滅ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ TBP06ベルトパック・トランスミッター トランスミッターã�Œã‚ªãƒ•ã�®çŠ¶æ…‹ã�§ã€�Channel Selectスライド・スイッãƒ�ã‚’ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル6ã�«è¨­å®šã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ トランスミッターã�®é›»æº�を入れã�¾ã�™ã€‚ Channel Selectスイッãƒ�を左端ã�®ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル1ã�¾ã�§ç´ æ—©ã��スライドã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ Channel Selectスイッãƒ�ã‚’å�³ç«¯ã�®ãƒ�ャンãƒ�ル6ã�¾ã�§ç´ æ—©ã��スライドã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ 以上ã�®ãƒ—ロセスをã€�é›»æº�投入後3秒以内ã�«çµ‚ã‚�らã�›ã‚‹å¿…è¦�ã�Œã�‚ã‚Šã�¾ã�™ã€‚ é�’ã�„LEDã�Œ1回点滅ã�—ã�¦ã€�トランスミッターã�ŒRF1 (4周波数ä¼�é€�モード) ã�§ã�‚ã‚‹ã�“ã�¨ã‚’示ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚RF2ä¼�é€�モードã�¸æˆ»ã�™ã�«ã�¯ã€�å�Œã�˜ã‚¹ãƒ†ãƒƒãƒ—ã‚’ç¹°ã‚Šè¿”ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚é�’ã�„LEDã�Œ2回点滅ã�—ã�¾ã�™ã€‚ 注æ„�: トランスミッターã�®ãƒ¢ãƒ¼ãƒ‰ã‚’変更ã�—ã�Ÿå ´å�ˆã€�ã��ã�®å¤‰æ›´ã�¯é›»æº�を入れ直ã�™ã�“ã�¨ã�§è¨˜æ†¶ã�•ã‚Œã�¾ã�™ã€‚一度電æº�スイッãƒ�を切ã�£ã�¦ã�‹ã‚‰ã€�å†�度オンã�«ã�—ã�¦ã��ã� ã�•ã�„。ã�“ã�®ä½œæ¥­ã‚’è¡Œã�†å‰�ã�«é›»æ± を抜ã�„ã�¦ã�—ã�¾ã�†ã�¨ã€�以å‰�ã�®ãƒ¢ãƒ¼ãƒ‰ã�«æˆ»ã�£ã�¦ã�—ã�¾ã�„ã�¾ã�™ã€‚
  22. Hey guys, I'm going to be playing live a bit in the near future, and I like to move around a good bit while playing. Naturally, a wireless system seems to make the most sense. What is the best wireless system for guitar -> Helix? My main guitar is a Jackson with passives, but I also have a guitar with actives, so that is probably worth a consideration (the guitar has a 1/4 inch out, not a Variax). What is the best wireless system for my needs? It looks like the Line 6 G10 is pretty decent, but I have read some not great reports about signal dropout inside the 75 foot range and some loss of the high-end frequencies. I am not a "huge" stickler for tone, but I really like a mean attack from the pick (play mostly hard rock/thrash) so losing attack is a big negative for me.
  23. ****If you recently purchased a Relay V75-SC Super Cardioid Microphone and that capsule does not have microphone models when placed on another XDV-75 handheld microphone body, then you will need to update the firmware on that handheld microphone to version 2.10. Instructions for updating Line 6 wireless systems can be found in other Knowledge Base articles.**** Range XD-V 70/75 systems are rated at 300 feet under ideal conditions and the XD-V30 systems are rated at a 100 foot range. This ‘Open Air Wireless Range’ also known as ‘Line of Sight’, meaning the transmitter’s antenna must have a clear path to the receiver’s antenna and be reasonably free of interference. For best performance ‘Line of Sight’ should be maintained between the receiver’s antennas and the transmitter’s antennas. Radio waves travel in straight lines and do not go around corners. Barriers such as walls can impede the path of radio waves depending on the thickness and the type of construction. RF will not transmit efficiently through metal barriers. If you have aluminum siding or a metal roof, it is unlikely the RF signal will transmit through this barrier with much efficiency. When using wireless systems indoors you could experience a moderate reduction in range compared to outdoors depending on conditions. RF will not transmit through the earth so if the receiver is placed in the basement, and the earth or ground is obstructing the line of sight transmission, it will not receive the direct signal. Human bodies also absorb RF energy and can affect maximum range so remember to place your antennas accordingly. Avoid cupping the bottom of the handheld mic as it will block the antenna resulting in a loss of range. Another significant reduction of range can be expected if the receiver antennas for the XD-V systems are very close to other intentional radiators in the same frequency band such as Wi-Fi wireless access points. Using the XD-V70 with remote paddle antennas and separating the antennas by several feet can be an effective way to mitigate this condition. Interference Q: What is the difference between Analog and Digital wireless systems handling of interference? A: Since the XD-V wireless system is digital, it is able to ‘intelligently’ ignore all signals that are not specifically intended for it. As a result, no audible interference can be generated due to other RF signals occurring simultaneously with the XD-V RF signals. Additionally, the XD-V system utilizes a frequency diversity system in which four different RF frequencies are transmitted for each single audio channel. Only if there are errors or loss of signal on all four RF frequencies within a single transmission packet will an XD-V system mute. Loss of RF signal can be the result of trying to function at too great a distance, having unintentional transmitters too close to a receiver (near/far), or a significant amount of close-by RF signals within the same 2.4GHz range (Wi-Fi, microwave ovens, etc.). In all cases, the symptoms will be the same: reduction of RF LEDs on the front panel that indicate usable RF signal strength, followed by the audio signal muting. Once good enough RF signal is received again, the signal will unmute. Put simply, all forms of potential interference for the XD-V system will have the net effect of reducing the total usable distance for the system. If your application does not require maximum range, then typically little concern about other radio signals is required. If you intend to use your system at a distance, it is recommended that you ‘walk test’ your system in advance of an event to verify that sufficient RF signal is available to avoid mutes from occurring over the entire desired range. Output Level Q: Why does the level change when I swap an XD-V digital wireless with my old wireless system? A: XD-V digital wireless are designed to be the same as a wired mic and are "unity" at the receiver's output relative to input to the transmitter. Most other wireless systems have gain stages that amplify the signal above the mic level itself. This means there is no relationship between the input level to the transmitter and the output level of the receiver. If the gain has been turned up on your old system then you will likely notice a drop in level when you hot-swap with an XD-V. This is a simple ‘gain-structure’ issue and is not a measure of sound quality. So if you hot-swap an XD-V wireless with the same mic as the model you have selected you will not need to make any changes to your gain structure. If you are replacing an older wireless unit that has gain added, you will need to balance the trim (gain) controls on your mixer inputs to accommodate the ‘unity mic level’ of the XD-V. This is why mixer inputs have gain adjustments ‘¦ so you can properly match mic preamp gain to the input source. Remember, XD-V digital wireless is mic level output only and must be plugged into a mic level input and not a line level input. If the trim controls are calibrated on your input strips a gain of 25-30 dB will probably be in the ballpark with an average vocalist. Frequency/Channels Q: What is different about the XD-V systems compared to the XDR-955? A: The XD-V30/XD-V70 systems use a higher frequency (2.4 GHz) and operate on 6 or 12 channels respectively, rather than 5. The XD-V channels numbers do not correspond to 802.11 Wi-Fi channels however. Q: Can the XDR-955 microphone be used with the XD-V systems? A: Both systems run in completely different frequency ranges so they are not inter-compatible, but X2 and XD-V units can be used on the same stage (along with any other analog wireless systems) with no problems. Q: Are the Relay G-series components compatible with the XD-V series components (or vice versa)? A: Because they both operate in the same 2.4 GHz frequency range, they are compatible. Q: Do the XD-V digital wireless systems share channels with the Relay systems? A: Both XD-V systems share their first 6 channels with the Relay G30. The XD-V70 shares all 12 of its channels with the Relay G50 and G90 models. A total of up to 14 systems can potentially be combined if the V70 firmware has been updated. Batteries and Power Supplies Q: Can I use rechargeable batteries? A: Yes, but the hours and minutes are calibrated to alkaline batteries. Different battery chemistries discharge at different rates, therefore the battery meter reading may be inaccurate when alkaline batteries are not used. The run time will be directly related to the current capability of the batteries. Some experimentation will be necessary to determine how they perform for you. Carbon Zinc batteries should not be used with XD-V wireless systems. Q: Why is the battery meter higher when I restart than when I shut off the transmitter? A: Line 6 2.4G wireless transmitters have a circuit that measures the actual real-time voltage of the installed batteries and transmits that data to the battery meters in the receivers. The battery meters are very accurate when they have been running continuously since new batteries were installed in the transmitter and the transmitter power has not been cycled on and off. However due to the chemical nature of Alkaline batteries, when they have been shut off, the voltage begins to ‘rebound ‘ and the voltage actually increases compared to its value at shutoff. Unfortunately it does not last long and it reverts to true self over twenty minutes or so. For this reason when you first turn on a Transmitter that has been run but allowed to rest the meter will give a high reading that quickly falls over the first few minutes and continues to fall quickly for the first few minutes. This is normal behavior for Alkaline batteries. Q: What's the battery life of XD-V digital wireless systems? A: Battery life depends on the current capacity of the batteries used. Typically AA alkaline batteries can provide about 2400 mAh and will provide about 8 hours of continuous use from two AA alkaline batteries when run on "high" power. Typically you will get 10 hours on the "low" power setting. Be aware of "alkaline rebound" when turning off the unit and turning it back on, as it may look like it has more power than it really has. Antenna Distro Q: Can the RX212 Receiver antennas be linked together? A: Up to 6 receivers can be daisy-chained together using the built-in antenna distro system. LMR-195 antenna cable is required for linking up multiple XD-V receivers. The last unit in the chain should be "terminated" (using the supplied term plugs) when linking receivers together. (Please see the Advanced User Guide). External Antennas Q: What type of antennas work with the XD-V70 receiver (RX212)? A: Line 6 offers both "omni"(P360) and "patch" (P180) directional paddle style antennas as options. http://store.line6.com/. These antennas have built-in line amps to accommodate long cable runs (up to 100' or more) depending on cable type. Antennas connect to Line 6 receivers with BNC connectors. LMR-195 cable (or better) should be used and the gain switch should be set to match the approximate loss of the cable. There are many specialty antennas made by third parties that may also be used. They must be specifically tuned for the 2.4GHz band. You must remember to take into account line loss when using passive antennas Mic Capsules for XD-V Handheld Transmitters Q: What mic capsules can be used with the XD-V handheld transmitters? A: XD-V Handheld transmitters have been designed to allow for the use of interchangeable capsules from 3rd party manufacturers such as Earthworks, Telefunken, Shure and others. However since there is no actual standard for compatibility there is some risk of unintended signal or mechanical issues. Users are advised to test specific combinations prior to purchase. Before replacing a capsule the power should be shut off. Simply screw on the desired capsule, then turn on the power. Mic modeling is bypassed (and not available) when using 3rd party capsules. Depending on the level of the capsule and the loudness of the person singing/speaking into it, the Environment filter may need to be switched ‘off’ if a gating sound occurs. Using Third Party Mics w/ Beltpacks Q: What is the pin-out for wiring to a TA4F connector? A: Pin 1 - Gnd Pin 2 - V+ Pin 3 - Signal Pin 4 - Z (leave open for instrument)(short to pin 3 for mic) For a normal, everyday, run-of-the-mill, Tip/Sleeve (TS) connector for a 1/4" instrument cable end,... the signal goes from 1/4" Tip to TA4F pin-3 (Signal), and 1/4" Sleeve goes to TA4F pin-1 (Gnd). Don’t worry about pins 2 and 4, those are used for Lavaliere Mic connections. Q: What mics work with the XD-V70 Beltpack Transmitter A: Questions often come up as to what mics are compatible with the system and how to adjust the gain to match other wireless systems. Line 6 XD-V70 beltpacks (TBP12) are essentially unity level devices meaning the output voltage of receiver essentially matches the input voltage of the transmitter. So it raises the question’¦ ‘match the level to what?’. Traditional systems are essentially a mic coupled with a preamp, not just a microphone alone. This may require thinking about your system in a new way. With traditional wireless systems that have limited dynamic range, gain and level control are essential if one hopes to have reasonable hiss free operation without excessive distortion. No gain or level matching is required when using XD-V wireless systems because of the XD-V’s wide dynamic range and compander free operation. So the system gain requirement is to have the speech or vocal input to the microphone present an appropriate level into the mic preamp so that the preamp can raise the voltage to be optimum into the next stage of the mixer. Gain is likely needed somewhere in this chain, but as long as the mic preamp has enough gain available there is no problem re-adjusting the input trim to do this. Just turn it up as much as needed. Just remember to plug the output of the XD-V into a ‘mic level’ input on the mixer as it is not intended to be used into a ‘line level’ input. In order to be able to certify a mic and being compatible one would have to know the distance from the user’s mouth and the level of their singing/speech. The sensitivity of both the Line 6 HS70 and the LM4-T lav mic is -46 dB, so using a mic that is approximately the same in sensitivity will result in a similar output voltage to the factory supplied mic. If a lower sensitivity mic were used with any traditional wireless system you would need to turn up the gain in the transmitter, receiver and/or the mixer. If the levels of these three controls are not in perfect sync with each other the result will be extra distortion or extra noise/hiss. With Line 6 XD-V is greatly simplified. Simply make adjustments at the mixer (in the same way as you work with a mic with a cable). Much less complicated (although it may be different than what a user is used to) it insures maximum headroom and far less chance to get it wrong. Just turn up the mixer, that’s why the knobs move. Remember, the relative position of a knob means almost nothing. The correct place is the correct place’¦ no matter where it occurs on the rotation. Examples: Shure® WL-185â„¢ lav is -45.5 dB WL-184â„¢ lav is -44.5 dB’¦ so these mics would be almost identical to The Line 6 LM4. WH30TQâ„¢ headset is -55 dB so it will need a 10 dB boost of the mic trim control on the mixer as compared to the LM4-T to have the same level. Countryman® E6 headsets come with different sensitivities and are specified per application. The E6ow5â„¢ is for general speaking and is the closest to our LM4 levels The E6ow6â„¢ is for strong speaking and singing The E6ow7â„¢ is for ‘powerful vocals’ and will seem very quiet if used for ‘normal speech’ as compared to our LM4-T. This would likely be a poor choice for general speech but could be the proper mic for a screaming singer. Countryman also provides caps to cover and further modify the mic element which can provide additional gain. Audio Technica® AT831â„¢ lav is -46 dB AT898â„¢ lav is -46 dB * Please double-check that the Audio Technica mic is a model equipped with the TA4F connector. You may need to special order a unit with the correct connection type or refit your existing cable end with the TA4F plug. DPA® 4066â„¢ omni headset is -44 dB 4061â„¢ omni lav is -44 dB 4060â„¢ high output omni lav is ‘“ 35 dB good with very quiet talkers or if the mic is some distance from the performer. Microphone sensitivity does affect the performance of the Environment Filter. If the sensitivity of the mic used is too low there may be audible artifacts. Depending on the situation it may be advisable to switch the filter to ‘off’. Racking V70/75 Receivers Q: How do I connect multiple receivers for rack mounting? A: The XD-V 70/75 half rack sized receivers can be locked together to become a single rack width using the supplied "dovetail key". When mounting a pair of receivers side by side, start with the dovetail inserted approximately half way in the side groove. Then start the second unit, from the front towards the rear and slide until they are closely aligned. A small tap with a mallet and block will align and secure the key in place and level the front faces. Use the short rack ear supplied with each receiver to complete the pair. Multiple rack pairs can be linked together by using dovetail keys in the top and bottom slots of a rack pair. When assembling more than a single pair it is recommended that the left ‘half’ and the right ‘half’ be assembled first and then the ‘halves’ joined together into the 19’ assembly. Wi-Fi Interference Q: Why does my Wi-Fi slow down when I get my transmitter near my computer? A: Because Wi-Fi and Line 6 2.4GHz wireless products share the same frequency band-space. Some users may experience a slowing down or even interruption of their Wi-Fi capabilities when using microphone or instrument transmitters in close proximity to their computers or routers. This is an example of a near/far interference problem and it may be intensified because consumer grade Wi-Fi typically has limited RF dynamic range. Using more XD-V channels operating at the same time will create more competition to Wi-Fi than a single channel would. If your Line 6 transmitter gets within 6 feet of your laptop you may witness this situation especially if your Wi-Fi access point is some distance away. Typically, simply moving your Line 6 transmitter farther away from your computer will remedy the situation. Users of Line 6 twelve channel systems can switch their transmitters to the ‘low power’ setting as this will mitigate the problem as well. If you are using the system outside the USA you can likely switch your Wi-Fi channels to 12, 13 or 14 depending on your location. The frequencies for these channels are outside the Line 6 2.4GHz frequencies. Likewise, switching Wi-Fi to 802.11n in the 5GHz band will avoid Line 6 wireless frequencies and double your potential Wi-Fi throughput. Suggested channels settings to avoid interfering with Wi-Fi. If your wifi network utilizes the channel listed, use the channel # listed under the Line 6 wireless channel column. Troubleshooting Q: Why am I getting dropouts? A: Assuming no hardware issues, dropouts generally occur because of local conditions. Do I have clear line of sight? The transmitter antenna should be able to ‘see’ the receiver’s antennas. Is your audience blocking the line of sight? Raising antennas to 6-8 feet high will often fix this problem. Make sure you are not being blocked by obstacles such as metal posts, walls, etc. Are your antennas connected firmly and splayed at 90 degrees? If they are straight up and down you could fall victim to a dead zone. Are other XD-Vs operating on the same channel? Each system needs its own unique channel to operate on. Do you have the receiver’s antennas near any intentional transmitters such as walkie-talkies, In-Ear Monitors, etc? They will need to be separated. The distance will depend on the strength of the transmitter and the gain of the transmitting antenna. Are you using the factory power supply? If you are using a substitute supply you must make certain it can supply the required 9vdc at 350 ma. Q: Why is the signal so weak compared to other wireless systems? A: XD-V digital wireless systems have "mic level" outputs (both XLR and 1/4" jacks) and need to be connected in the same manner as wired microphones are and with similar gain/trim settings. Plugging into a "line level" input or a channel with pads engaged will result in a weak and likely noise signal. The preferred connection is with the XLR output on the receiver to an XLR input on the mixer. The 1/4" output is unbalanced and is included as a convenience for users plugging into instrument amplifiers. It is important to NOT use TRS plugs into this jack as the "ring" is used for system upgrades and carries digital information that could be "noisy" if it were connected to an audio input. Q: Why is the sound so "thin"? A: This may be caused by the "Environment Filter" is the signal is too weak, especially when using lav mics. Try turning the filter to the "off" position. Q: What does the Near/Far spec mean? A: The Near/Far interference problem is common to all radio systems and happens when a strong RF signal in the same band uses a large portion of the available gain in a receiver making it difficult or impossible for the receiver to decode the weaker signal. Imagine having a conversation in a quiet room with a person 20 feet away from you. It is likely that you can carry on a conversation with normal voice levels. Now if you move to a noisy environment, with lots of other voices right around your ears, it may be very difficult for the conversation to continue with your long distance friend without the both of you shouting. A similar circumstance occurs with radios, and since the long distance transmitter is incapable of increasing its power output, it is very likely a very near transmitter may interrupt it. In the real world, this is rarely an unmanageable problem. You should avoid having a transmitter closer than 3 feet to a receiver that is not on your channel if the intended transmitter is more than 50 feet from this receiver. If this is a regular requirement you should install remote paddle antennas (G90, XD-V70 series). The near/far spec for XD-V70 is 50’/3’ which means if another transmitter (even though it is on a different channel) gets within 3 feet of your channels antennas at the same time you get 50 feet away the system could be affected in a negative manner.. By increasing the distance between antennas (using the paddle antennas) or simply raising the units up higher, it will become far less a possibility. LED Codes Q: What do the different LED colors mean on the XD-V system components? XD-V70 System THH12 Handheld Transmitter: No LEDs (see owner’s manual for LCD screen info) TBP12 Beltpack Transmitter LED states: Blue LED = power/>1hr battery life Solid red LED = Low Flashing red LED = Very Low/Change batteries Audio LED = Green LED (indicates audio signal) RX212 Receiver: Audio Green LEDs = audio signal present Battery Green LEDs = full battery life Red LED = less than two hours remaining Flashing red = Very Low / Change batteries RF Transmitter on same channel as receiver: Green to indicate signal strength/quality: from 5 Green = Data excellent, interference low to 1 Green meaning Data minimal, may have significant interference. When transmitter is off, or set to different channel than receiver these LEDs show as follows: No LED = No data, no interference 1 Red = No data, some potential interference up to 5 Red = No data, high potential interference. XD-V30 System THH06 Handheld Transmitter LED states: Channel LEDs - Illuminates blue to show the current active channel THH06 is transmitting on. Channel 6 LED will illuminate red when battery life is low and blink red when very low (change batteries). TBP06 Beltpack Transmitter LED states: Audio Green LED = Audio Signal Orange = On power/channel change Battery Blue LED = power/>1hr battery life Solid Red LED = Low Charge Flashing Red LED = Very Low Charge Purple: On channel change RXT06 Receiver LED states 3 Green = Data excellent 2 Green = Data OK, may have some interference 1 Green = Data minimal, may have significant interference No LED = No data, no interference 1 Red = No data, some interference 2 Red = No data, more interference 3 Red = No data, high interference Q: Does USB 3.0 create interference in the 2.4GHz frequency range? A: USB 3.0 computer cables and peripherals, including hard drives, are known to emit radio frequency interference throughout the 2.4GHz band, which results in reduced range and/or performance for any 2.4GHz device in its proximity (including wireless keyboard or mouse, WiFi, etc.). We recommend placing any digital wireless receivers at least two meters away from the USB 3.0 device and its cabling. Below is a link to a study by Intel regarding this interference. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/io/universal-serial-bus/usb3-frequency-interference-paper.html
  24. All 3rd generation Line 6 digital wireless transmitters and receivers are designed to be cross-compatible with each other. For example, the six-channel Relay G30 transmitter will work on channels 1 through 6 of the XD-V75 receiver. The units in question must be on the same RF mode (RF1 or RF2). 3rd generation products include G30, G50, G55, G90 and XD-V 35, XD-V 55, XD-V 70 and XD-V 75.
  25. Updating Your Handheld Microphone THH12 Updating Your Handheld Microphone THH06
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