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regalpierot

Boss GT1000, like WTF

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Yet to find a video where it sounds even slightly less than awful tone. Was thinking I'd just hit upon a few demo people who had used sub par recording methods but at this stage I'm blaming the processor. Explains why the reps talk a lot and try to drop a lot of 'wow factor' science about what's under the hood, the longer you can keep that up the more you avoid that first chord strum where the interviewers get that 'blah' look. Even the decal and rotaries look super cheap, how could Boss fail so much at this. You would want to be out of your mind at that that price point not to get a Helix LT or the likes.

 

Like here, this is indicative of the demo but without the needless 'it has a flux capacitor in it' babbling

 

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Yet to find a video where it sounds even slightly less than awful tone. Was thinking I'd just hit upon a few demo people who had used sub par recording methods but at this stage I'm blaming the processor. Explains why the reps talk a lot and try to drop a lot of 'wow factor' science about what's under the hood, the longer you can keep that up the more you avoid that first chord strum where the interviewers get that 'blah' look. Even the decal and rotaries look super cheap, how could Boss fail so much at this. You would want to be out of your mind at that that price point not to get a Helix LT or the likes.

 

Like here, this is indicative of the demo but without the needless 'it has a flux capacitor in it' babbling

 

https://youtu.be/h9-m2BQHhxk

 

A wise man once said, "If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$hit"...😂

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I have to confess I didn’t get into Helix party when it was released with only the first available patch-browsing demos, but pulled the trigger only when snapshots came into play, and community had grown. But something tells me that with this Boss this isn’t even the case :-D disclaimer. and for the sake of progress, I wish I’m wrong

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I got to play through and mess around with the GT-1000 a little at NAMM, and I guess it was what I expected. Other than some UI and industrial design elements that were, uh, borrowed from the Helix, it still felt like a Boss multi-FX processor. There was nothing particularly user-friendly about it. Actually, when I stepped up to the unit I was demoing, there was a loop running that someone else had recorded at some point. It took me a good two minutes or so to figure out how to stop that from playing. Eventually, the only way I could figure out how to stop it was to go to the signal flow view and navigate over to the looper block. There just aren't a lot of on-screen cues as to what is going on with the unit.

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Watching the videos as they were unfolding during the NAMM18 show, I was particularly interested when Anderton's from the UK visited the BOSS booth - especially since Danish Pete was along with him.

Pete is an exceptional and nuanced player who makes things sound good at the minimum.

And I was relieved when (Captain) Lee suggested that Pete have a go at the tail of the video.

... that 'Pete Magic' didn't seem to come during that part of the segment, which was surprising.

 

From what I've gathered, there are some excellent concepts being employed as far as processor block - for lack of knowing what BOSS's lingo for this is - 'referencing' - wherein an amp, for instance, can be tweaked and those changes are reflected in all (or possibly a user-defined sub-set - I haven't delved into the full details, but I do believe this is more the case than 'all') of the presets which call that amp up.

I believe effects processes can be treated in that same manner.

 

Like the other comments above, I didn't hear any demo segments of the GT-1000 which tweaked my ear.

I hope it's more a matter of being down to more tweaking due to depth of parameters which I trust are there.

I do know that I can walk up to a Katana series amp and 'blind dial' up a sound which I'll happily test guitars with etc. I'd be curious to try to walk up to a GT-1000 and try to see what I could dial in.

Going by phil_m's experience, I would tend to expect to be rather lost on the controls.

 

(Along these lines, I along with my good friend got to sit down at our 'home base' retailer and unbox and test out a HeadRush - we could not get a great sound out of that to save our lives... which was perplexing, since I've heard some genuinely impressive sounds pulled from those - Marco Fanton for instance has demonstrated several.

Maybe IRs become a big factor there.)

 

I guess I'm biased, but I have gone into that same retailer where they had set up a Helix Floor on a stand, a Yorkville Elite 10" powered speaker, and I brought a guitar, plugged in, and dialed up a simple multi-purpose Snapshot patch with nothing but onboard cabs etc, and had some great tones in very very short order.

Incidentally, Yorkville YX10P powered speakers work AMAZINGLY well for FRFR type applications with Helix - incredibly consistent with my experience dialing sounds and then comparing to direct into a SoundCraft board pushing Mackie 12" mains. I think I posted somewhere on the forum here about that.

I run a pair of them at home, and my computer can be routed to them as well =]

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I have to admit being a little envious of the built in Bluetooth and IOS/Android editing capabilities and as an ex-GT user, I'll probably acclimate to the Boss GUI fairly quickly. Not gonna pass judgement on its tonal capabilities until I've used it and spent some time with it. I think that the Helix is the best modeler I've used to date but at the same time, I also think that if you had the luxury of having enough time with the best of them, you could get them to sound very similarly. To me, when it comes to general tonalities, it's a matter of how capable the EQ is on each device.

 

Amp feel/response is for me where things break down for modelers. That you can't fix with EQ and no amount of tweaking will cure it's ills if that one factor just ain't there in the first place.

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To be fair, it took me about a week to get my strat sounding good with high gain on my GT100. I also saw in one NAMM video where the Boss rep said the software was still being tweaked on the 1000. For a grand, I hope they can make it sound better that what I've heard so far!

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One thing I don't like about this GT is that it has an external power supply. For $1k, I shouldn't have to pack around a wall wart or lump in the middle PS. It should be built in.

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I have been a fan of Boss single pedals since way back as the sort of workingman's meat & potato pedal. Relatively inexpensive, built like a tank, and they were some of the easiest ones to find when I first started playing guitar. After owning almost every version, the last Boss multi-effect/modeler I owned was the GT-10. Just fine for effects into the front of a tube amp but I never liked the sound of the COSM amps and cabs. I never felt comfortable replacing my amp with an FRFR using that device. Maybe just personal taste but the GT-10 never really moved me and ultimately I ended up preferring my single analog pedals to it and abandoned it altogether. 

 

Apologies in advance if I repeat anything that was said here already. I will have to reserve judgement on the GT-1000. They have revamped the COSM engine with their new AIRD (Augmented Impulse Response Dynamics) technology and they are using a more powerful processor.  I do like the fact that they are offering a Blutooth editor with it. A serious improvement from their old modelers which only had an Editor built by a third party. Don't know if the sound is significantly improved without trying it. The demo sounds have not impressed me so far but they rarely do. Overall the chassis looks a lot like a revamped GT-10 and although this is the most major revision to their multi-effects/modeler line I have seen in decades I don't see anything that speaks to me of a paradigm shift yet other than the price. Seems like every company is scrambling to get up into the Fractal pricing stratosphere. For the money I would be much more inclined to purchase the Helix LT or even a Headrush before I went for the Boss.

 

I hope some folks who end up owning this device come back in to give us a review. Don't want to prejudge it unfairly but from what I have seen so far I have no inclination to rush out and get one. I do know that if past history is any indication this thing better be great out of the gate as Boss tends to do few to no firmware upgrades. Don't know if this will change at this price-point. They do build devices that are incredibly stable and relatively bug-free right from the jump however. For me though the Helix and the LT have too many features that are more important to me and too good an interface at this time for the Boss to provide any real competition per my tastes. I wish Boss luck though, I have a soft spot for them as I cut my teeth playing their effects and as usual the more competition and the more innovation, the better it is for us guitar players.

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Clean tone was decent-ish, the dirty stuff left a lot to be desired. It's tough to judge by these videos, but given what I see there I can't imagine springing for that with Helix LT at the same price point. And I'm not just saying that because I'm a happy Helix owner posting on the Helix forum... I'd love to see them continue to refine their technology and put out something that pushes the envelope!

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I gigged with a GT10 for a while. It took me a while to get the sound to 'sit' in the mix well and usually meant an EQ block . But their effects quality is high and they definitely got better with the editor later with the GT100 and the ME80. I have an ME80 now that I use for sit-in's and as a backup. teh things sounds great and it allows me to get real knob tweakin' out of my system.

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I remember being seventeen in 1989 and playing my first ever gig with an Ibanez Metal Charger pedal. After, a guy came up and lectured me that I needed to use Boss pedals if I wanted a decent tone! Back then in Ireland, it was either Boss or cheap budget stuff, we couldn't get MXR and the like. So it's always stuck with me that Boss is the baseline for gig quality pedals, even though that guy was full of poop.

 

Skip forward some years, and my first modeller was a Boss GX-700, and listening back to my recordings from that time, the tones still stand up. It was a fantastic unit, and a real bargain at around £400 in the mid-to-late nineties. I got many years of use out of that processor.

 

Most recently, I needed a compact multi fx for fly gigs, and I had my eye on the Boss MS-3. I waited to see what Line6 had to offer at NAMM, and while the HXFX seems to be a great piece of gear, the form factor of the MS-3 suits my purposes better. It does everything I need it to do, can run off a battery pack, sounds very decent, and it sits nicely on my Pedaltrain Nano+. On the downside, the user interface illustrates just how good a job Line6 did on theirs. It's not difficult to use, per se, but it's not a Helix. I've been working with the MS-3 for the last two weeks and it's a very good piece of kit for its intended task.

 

To cut a long story short, Boss excel at making decent reliable gear at the right price, good tools for the jobs at hand. This is where I think the GT-1000 falls down; it tries to take on the Helix at a similar price point to the LT, but if you're going to take the Helix head on, you'll need to blow it out of the water. Which, clearly, Boss haven't done. If they'd been able to price it lower, aiming at the guitarist who's making the step from bedroom to stage, then it could have been seen as a cheaper alternative to the Helix and might have been a hit. As it stands, priced to compete with the Helix? Well, it doesn't.

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Ha, speaking of Boss and Ireland, I remember as a kid walking into Musicmaker on Exchequer St. and seeing that board of every available boss Pedal all chained together and ready to play. Back then in Ireland Boss was definitely the premium Pedal reserved for the very few who had money. I think DOD was the only other recognizable brand around. My first ever pedal was a DOD Compressor/Sustainer I bought purely because I liked the color of the thing (orange, yup I was that stupid). Took it home, returned it because I thought it was broken because it didn't change the sound (no idea what a compressor was at 12) and had my first ever encounter with the smug sarcastic lollipops that often work the guitar counter at music places. Still running into them from time to time (talking about you Guitar Center)

 

Right, pointless babble I know, back to all things Helix.

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Watching any video on the Boss GT-1000 just makes me angry; Not just what I've heard from the unit, but also the deflective answers from reps about its capabilities. Additionally, the manual says, "Bluetooth availablility depends on the country...". Its crap like this that makes me want to reach through my monitor and throttle someone.

 

Bring back the GX-700. NOW.

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On 06/02/2018 at 1:25 PM, regalpierot said:

Yet to find a video where it sounds even slightly less than awful tone. Was thinking I'd just hit upon a few demo people who had used sub par recording methods but at this stage I'm blaming the processor. Explains why the reps talk a lot and try to drop a lot of 'wow factor' science about what's under the hood, the longer you can keep that up the more you avoid that first chord strum where the interviewers get that 'blah' look. Even the decal and rotaries look super cheap, how could Boss fail so much at this. You would want to be out of your mind at that that price point not to get a Helix LT or the likes.

 

Like here, this is indicative of the demo but without the needless 'it has a flux capacitor in it' babbling

 

 

My ears have just vomited.

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I have my Helix LT some time now and I absolutely love it, it is great! But before the LT I used the GT 100 and I liked that a lot. So I am still interested in what Boss has to offer. But I cannot find any good vids about it....all I see are those Namm vids and they are not good. For me the GT 100 was user friendly at the time. It has 2 screens which was handy as I remember. How is the screen interface in the GT 1000? I want to see a vid about that. And some good vids about tone building. How it works, how it sounds. I am just curious. I am thinking that perhaps the vids so far don’t do the thing justice. Waiting for a quality review. 

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On 4/1/2018 at 12:13 PM, LutherDeLorme said:

all I see are those Namm vids and they are not good. How is the screen interface in the GT 1000? I want to see a vid about that. And some good vids about tone building. How it works, how it sounds. I am just curious. I am thinking that perhaps the vids so far don’t do the thing justice. Waiting for a quality review. 

 

I agree. I was a GT-8 user and love the Helix. The feel and response as well as its sonics are what really tipped me towards keeping it. That said, I had no trouble shaping the amp models to get sounds I wanted in the GT. No they weren’t as good as the Helix but they weren’t horrible. The feel and response however, and although they were far superior to the XT-Live, was still not like the Helix.

 

A long time has passed since the GT-8. I don’t believe that nothing has changed or improved in Boss’s modeling technology.  I’m gonna reserve judgement until I actually play with one. 

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I gigged with a GT-10 for years, as the Pod XT Live I owned didn't have a send/return loop for 4CM, and the Boss selection of effects was better in those days anyway. I found the amps on it barely usable, and clearly very digital-sounding when listened to closely - quantisation artifacts all over. I never upgraded to the GT-100 because they were obviously dumbing it down and 'streamlining' their units when I was in the market for something more powerful. But even back then, at least on the high gain amps, I would have chosen the XTL over the GT-10. Maybe not on blues and crunch but I don't use those amps so can't comment.

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On 4/2/2018 at 3:19 AM, kylotan said:

 But even back then, at least on the high gain amps, I would have chosen the XTL over the GT-10. Maybe not on blues and crunch but I don't use those amps so can't comment.

 

Yup. The low to medium gain sounds and response on the XT-Live were at best, sub-par compared to the GT-8. 

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I had the GT5 for years and still have a GX700

 

Great units at the time if you learned how to use them. Still stand up in a band mix and built to last

 

no idea about the new ones though

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On 4/1/2018 at 8:05 PM, robbieb61 said:

Here is the official vid. Sounds good on this one.

 

 

Hmmm... They featured its "whammy" effect on this video. Single note only but if it can do polyphonic pitch shifting better than the Helix, that's a very attractive feature for some folks.

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One thing the GT1000 has that the Helix doesn't is an signal output meter.  This is about the only other feature I'd like to have in Helix, other than a polyphonic pitch shifter.

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A feature of the GT-100 (which is also in the GT-1000) that I miss in the Helix is the polyphonic tuner.  It’s a great feature for gigs, because in-between songs you can simply strum the strings and within one or two seconds you visually see the tuning of all strings.  I can check and tune all six strings in less time than I can tune one with the Helix Mexican jumping bean tuner.  I ended up buying a Polytune 3 to put in front of my Helix because I dislike the tuner that much.  Hopefully, polyphonic tuning is something that will be added to the Helix in the future.

 

A welcome addition to the GT-1000 are three control buttons, however I’m disappointed to see them in the back row.    My mode of playing is to select a patch in between songs, and then I use the control button(s) to switch on effects or overdrive for solos.  When a solo is coming up mid-song, , I plant my heel in front of the control button so that I can kick it on without looking down.  With the control buttons in the back row, it will be necessary to reach over the other buttons with the toe to kick a solo boost on and off. On my Helix, I have it programmed so that patches are on the top row and snapshots on the bottom row.  It would have been nice if Boss gave you the option to program the button locations.

 

 

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On 4/9/2018 at 7:43 PM, MojoAxe said:

Helix Mexican jumping bean tuner. 

The most perfect description of the Helix’s tuner to date!

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I have been able to demo the GT1000 and , unlike all other multi effects pedals headrush and helix, plays nice into the front end and effects loop of a combo amp. Not the case with a Helix and Headrush that requires full range speakers to sound decent. It is also built quite well inspite of its customary Boss appearance. It appears that functionality was the objective over first appeal to cosmetics. So I think  they will be competition for Line6 and Everyone else based on functionality, ease of use and price point.  

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1 hour ago, ddmilne said:

I have been able to demo the GT1000 and , unlike all other multi effects pedals headrush and helix, plays nice into the front end and effects loop of a combo amp. Not the case with a Helix and Headrush that requires full range speakers to sound decent.

I’m not sure that is an entirely valid premise. I personally use Helix with FRFR but there are plenty of folks using it successfully in front of and/or into the effects loop of real amps, whether straight in or with 4-Cable-Method.

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I had a helix and was, like many others, unable to get a less than harsh tone out of it  with exception of the clean tones. Most Overdrive and Distortion sounds were unusable in a live setting. Way too harsh. I tried at will to get someone from line 6 community to suggest what may be wrong but everything I tried failed. I can see how Metal players might enjoy it, but I found that it muddled the lower registers with little string separation, and for 2000.00 CDN , this simply wasnt acceptable. I personally thought line 6 put more into the presenntation of the device than it did into reall musical functionality and reproduction of the varisous effects and amp models. However, it is possible that everything is on the setup. But out of the box I wasnt impressed. I play professionally and so far very few digital effects get a pass from me outside of delay and reverb units. If a lot of us are missing the magic, line6 needs to ilustrate more abundantly how to get good sounds out of each of its offerings. And there is the processed soudn that most of these pedals produce. This is a hurtle that needs to be slaid in my opinion.

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1 hour ago, ddmilne said:

I had a helix and was, like many others, unable to get a less than harsh tone out of it  with exception of the clean tones. Most Overdrive and Distortion sounds were unusable in a live setting. Way too harsh. I tried at will to get someone from line 6 community to suggest what may be wrong but everything I tried failed. I can see how Metal players might enjoy it, but I found that it muddled the lower registers with little string separation, and for 2000.00 CDN , this simply wasnt acceptable. I personally thought line 6 put more into the presenntation of the device than it did into reall musical functionality and reproduction of the varisous effects and amp models. However, it is possible that everything is on the setup. But out of the box I wasnt impressed. I play professionally and so far very few digital effects get a pass from me outside of delay and reverb units. If a lot of us are missing the magic, line6 needs to ilustrate more abundantly how to get good sounds out of each of its offerings. And there is the processed soudn that most of these pedals produce. This is a hurtle that needs to be slaid in my opinion.

 

Well if you were playing the Helix in front of a combo amp and had the amp modeling in the Helix at the same time, yes, that's almost a guaranteed recipe for it sound bad... The playback system is just as important, if not more, than the presets you're playing through. I am not a metal player in any sense of the word, and have been using the Helix for going on three years now. It allow me to do stuff as far as recording and playing live that I couldn't do easily otherwise. It does take a little patience getting it where you want it, but going into a decent FRFR system, it really isn't that hard, imo, to get great tones fast. It sounds to me that perhaps you're not giving the Helix a fair shake.

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I am trying to set up a trial at my music store with an FRFR. The Boss GT1000 played through an amp does have the familiar digital processed sound and it doesnt appear to have the flexibility of a helix. SO yes, I will be giving it another trial against the GT1000. Most of the units I have tried, Headrush included, seem to have a process envelope that comes out the speaker that makes it sound like your listening from the inside of a box. I would like to know if you were able to get away from that with your experience.

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2 hours ago, ddmilne said:

I am trying to set up a trial at my music store with an FRFR. The Boss GT1000 played through an amp does have the familiar digital processed sound and it doesnt appear to have the flexibility of a helix. SO yes, I will be giving it another trial against the GT1000. Most of the units I have tried, Headrush included, seem to have a process envelope that comes out the speaker that makes it sound like your listening from the inside of a box. I would like to know if you were able to get away from that with your experience.

 

I don't think any of us would be here if our listening experience even vaguely resembled "listening from inside a box". My experience is anything but...Helix is by far the most versatile piece of gear I've ever owned, providing a degree of consistency that I've never had in 25-odd years of various amps, rack units, and cabinets.  It sounds like an amp, and it feels like an amp...BUT, an amp that I'm hearing through the monitors in the control room whilst it roars away in the room next door....that's the difference. Does it sound like I'm standing 6 feet from my beloved Marshall 25th Anniv. Jubilee 4x12 that I dragged everywhere for 2 decades? No. And it won't. But that doesn't make it any better or worse... just different. They both have their merits. 

 

If it's the "amp in the room" aesthetic that your after, you're not gonna get that from a modeler, because it's not what they're designed to do (unless of course the new cabinets L6  recently announced actually do what they claim... jury is still out on that one). They exist to provide album-ready guitar tones for either direct recording and/or to bring those same tones to a live environment...without the eardrum rupturing volume needed to get the most from a tube amp, or the maintenance they require, and in a package that I can carry into the gig with one hand. Some make the transition and come to appreciate the  difference for what it is and versatility it affords, and others go back to their amps. Both are OK...

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21 hours ago, ddmilne said:

 Most of the units I have tried, Headrush included, seem to have a process envelope that comes out the speaker that makes it sound like your listening from the inside of a box. 

This sounds suspiciously like you had the Cab Sims turned on while playing the modeler through an amp. 

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On 4/17/2018 at 11:15 AM, cruisinon2 said:

 

 Does it sound like I'm standing 6 feet from my beloved Marshall 25th Anniv. Jubilee 4x12 that I dragged everywhere for 2 decades? No. And it won't. But that doesn't make it any better or worse... just different. They both have their merits. 

 

If it's the "amp in the room" aesthetic that your after, you're not gonna get that from a modeler, because it's not what they're designed to do 

I don't quite understand why everyone always says this.

I've ALWAYS had a big guitar rig which was usually including a rack full of effects. 
And the sound I've consistently gotten out of my Helix is JUST LIKE STANDING IN FRONT OF AN AMP. 


I wouldn't have kept the damn thing if it didn't sound that way. 
I'm not sure what the heck most of y'all are hearing...or maybe none of you ever played through a complete professional rig. 
But I have spent my whole life on stage with top notch gear behind me and it feeding back to me through a separate monitor mix in front of me as well. 

My last rig before the Helix, for instance, was a Bogner Ecstasy 101 B head going through a TC Electronic GForce and ending up in a Bogner 4x12 Greenback cabinet. 
And that was my smallest and simplest guitar rig in my whole life. 

Before that I was always using different versions of a poor man's "Bradshaw Rig".  For instance I had the Mesa Studio preamp running out into a rack full of effects ending with a Rocktron HUSH unit and going into a Mesa SimulClass 295 stereo tube power amp into 2 Marshall 4x12's.

Anyway...my Helix DOES sound like "my" sound that I always got with all my various rigs over the years. 

Maybe my idea of the "amp in the room" and other people's is different. If I thought my Helix sounded like some studio-homogenized sound...I would have returned it immediately.

To me it sings. And I play at a pretty loud volume as well. I would set my rig up with Helix and Bose L1 Compact beside a Marshall head and 4x12 cab any day onstage standing right in front of it. 

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6 hours ago, robbieb61 said:

I've ALWAYS had a big guitar rig which was usually including a rack full of effects. 
And the sound I've consistently gotten out of my Helix is JUST LIKE STANDING IN FRONT OF AN AMP. 

 

Same here.  Although my rig is smaller, I have had a Marshall JMP1 + 9100 and EL84 20/20 power amps through a pair of 1912 speakers or a stereo 4x12, with (variously) an Alesis Midiverb II, a Rocktron Intellifex and a TC GMajor for nigh on 20 years and in 4CM method its still my rig, and direct to FoH my Helix sounds like my rig through monitors.  Prior to that I've owned a Vox AC30, a Fender Twin, and had toured for a year or so with a proper Marshall Plexi, so I know good stuff 'in a room' sounds like.

The problem is it requires a different (not harder, just different) skillset to get something like a Helix or an AxeFX working properly.  It is astoundingly easy to plug a Tele, Strat or a Les Paul into a classic amp and get a good sound - I'd defy anyone not to nail any one of several classic fender sounds within 2 minutes after plugging a Strat into Fender Twin, similarly a Les Paul into a JCM800.  

Once you've acquired that skillset though, you'll be in a much better position to produce your own music, having understood what happens after a microphone in the studio, and dealt with various audio and digital interfacing scenarios.  Its well worth persevering ...

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I just picked up a GT-1000 yesterday. Not bad so far. One VERY miserable thing is that the buttons don't have a timed press and hold setting which means I can't have a tap tempo and press and hold for the tuner on the same button as I can on my helix. The helix UI is VASTLY superior for quick editing. 

I'll keep playing with the GT1000 and see how I like it in a week or so. I like it's weight and size for mobility and a lot of the pedals I've tried so far are very good. Yet to get into the amps.

Helix is definitely a keeper for now!

 

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I pre-ordered my GT-1000. Its a mistake I sincerely hope I can turn into a worthwhile piece of kit. It most certainly will NOT replace my Helix (Floor). 

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As an ex GT-8 user, the idea of a new GT held some allure, but it faded fast when I remembered how little I’m having to tweak the Helix these days. 

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Ok, I've had enough time to thoroughly try out the GT-1000 and, while has some very good points, it falls way short of the mark as far as being a lightweight Helix replacement. Helix ease of use is LIGHTYEARS ahead of the GT, especially in live performance quick-edit situations. The GT Bluetooth app honestly buys you nothing in the live quick-edit area and has a very clunky UI. I've put them side by side and reproduced various gig type edit-on-the-fly situations and the Helix smokes the GT hands down. The GT has a faster clock and DSP grunt but that buys you more seamless changes of complex patches that any useful sound quality advantage. I know some peeps have had issues with the Helix for changes in more complex patches but I've never had anything I couldn't get around with a snapshot or two although I'm sure there would be those happier with the extra engine power of the GT, I'm not moved by it.

Despite all the glory stories about AIRD, I must say I'm really not feeling the love on this one at all. Again the Helix gives me the ability to load umpteen IR's including a whole bunch of Celestion IR's which I honestly think sound better than ANY of the stock cabs on either box. The GT1000 gives you an incredibly stingy FIVE IR slots, and even then it seems like this was just an afterthought. 

Anyway, I could go on for ages but suffice to say I'll be getting rid of my brand new GT1000 and sticking with the Helix and HX Effects for now.

The GT1000 is close, but NO CIGAR!

(and, to be brutally honest, not really close at all)

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G'day all

I am after advice i own 2 guitars a2016 LP Standard and an 07 Fender American standard telecaster as well as 3 amps a spider 3 150 head, a spider v 240hc and an Australian  made 1964 Strauss Lancer 100 watt valve head. i use the V as a practice amp  for the moment and the usual butt load of pedals (Boss mainly) for the lancer but to use that amp to record etc was advised to look at FX Floorboards mainly the boss and the helix so i am hoping you guys can give me the info i need to choose . The main reason to use the Lancer is its sweet clean sound as well as being fairly basic  so direct plug in

 

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When all other comparisons are said and done I still have to say that for me the scribble strips remain one of the most compelling features of the Helix although the intelligent layout of the ample screen on the LT is a great substitute if you can't have scribble strips. One thing is clear to me, no matter what device I use as a successor to the Helix it will have to either include scribble strips or I will need to have a MIDI pedalboard that includes them to control it.  The advantage of being able to see a descriptive label above the footswitch on the Helix, or in the case of the LT on a large enough screen, is a feature I don't ever want to go without again. What good is having multiple footswitches only labeled by numbers when you are dealing with potentially thousands of snapshots (8 x over a thousand presets)? What good is having multiple stomps available if you can't quickly and easily see what effect they are controlling?

 

Btw, I would still like to see Line6 provide us with an option to using the camera icon for indicating snapshot names. This would give us back an extra six text characters for naming snapshots. Vote it up if you agree: https://line6.ideascale.com/a/dtd/Use-less-or-no-scribble-strip-spaces-to-indicate-a-snapshot/831165-23508#idea-tab-details

 

SCRIBBLE STRIPS RULE!!!!!

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