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Found 8 results

  1. Hi there, I'm fairly new to audio production, and have just purchased a Pod Studio UX2 for my mic setup and I'm looking to invest in some quality headphones. From what I understand the higher the Ohm range of the headphones the more power they require and if underpowered there volume may be bottleknecked. My UX2 is connected to a desktop, and I was wondering if connecting the headphones (I'm looking at a pair of Beyerdynamic DT 880 Pro's) to the output of my UX2 would provide enough power to get good, loud sound? Thanks Billy
  2. Title says it all The HX effects buzzes loudly when the usb is plugged in and goes away as soon as it is unplugged. Which would make editing basically useless once that is available. Anyone else having this problem? Or do i need to open a support ticket?
  3. Can the firehawk 1500 amps do all the orange amps because I just need one amp for gigging. All my orange amps are heavy to bring around so can the firehawk 1500 do that.
  4. Heirlooms904

    FX100 starting volume.

    So when I initially turn on my fx100 the master volume (red ring) is at a little below 25%, but the guitar volume (white ring) is incredibly loud at 75%+. The volume stays the same when I cycle between banks a-d, unless I manually lower it through the volume knob. Is there a way to lower and save the overall guitar volume so that it's not loud AF when I initially turn it on? As a reference I'm running it like this Guitar -> guitar in -> Amp out to Orange Micro dark fx return -> Bugera cab
  5. Hello, I just purchased and received my first Variax (Standard) Sunburst. First of all, it's a beautiful guitar and plays very well and feels great. I bought this guitar because I really needed a guitar that I could take to a gig and have so many different guitar types and tuning available like I'm sure many of you are thinking alike. Well, I was getting to know my new guitar absolutely stoked out. It played good for about 3o minute then it made a quick screeching sound and I just shrugged it off as it is working with some complex modeling systems and I kept playing. Well, maybe 10 to 15 minutes later this large airy noises started coming out of the guitar. When I turn the modeling system off and just use the regular SSS (Single-coil) system it fine but every time I push down on the modeling pot to on that guitar modeling system it starts that airy sound again. It's pretty loud and something I can't get by with. I also notice the 4th string (D string) is quite softer then the rest. I guess a new set of strings and setup might help with that but I'm totally bummed out with the noise problem. Please anyone of you can help me please let me know. I'm thinking that this could be a common situation but not sure. Much aloha from Hawaii and mahalo (Thank You) in advance.
  6. ZomgAnthony

    Line 6 Pod Pro Hd Not Loud Enough?

    Hi guys, I recently bought a Pod Hd Pro rack off of a friend and I'm running this through a ART SLA-1 Power amp (100watts@8ohms) and into an Avatar 8ohm cab (120 watts) with celestian V30s. I was practicing with some guys the other day, and for some reason, I have to crank the master AND channel volume all the way to the max to even hear it at a decent volume compared to everyone else(Drummer+6505 guitarist). Are there any settings I should be changing on the pod pro so that it is used for live amp use? or perhaps maybe the power amp is just not that strong?..
  7. bribrew1968

    Dt50 Possible Volume Fix

    I've been reading about the volume issues with the DT50 212. Too loud, etc. Before I say anything else its the real deal amp. I'm blown away with the HD500 integration. The Solo models are to die for!!!! Here's what I do to deal with volume issues: Each amps output can be set to the expression pedal without using DSP. Watch for how to do this. I've taken my amps/tones and used this technique to lower the overall volume (around a maximum value of 50-60) while keeping the master volume on the high power position (pushed in). Keep the master at about 12 o'clock (or what you like) and use the output settings to level each amp (patch) to each other and to lessen the output. This can be done with dual tones as well, just set both amps to similar parameters, and same expression pedal. Do you lose sound? At 50-60 ... no on most amp models. Some amp models lose slightly, but low volume is merely, usually practice. Is this the perfect fix? Probably not. However, your amp/patches will be leveled, properly loud, and get full use of channel volume and master volume mixes. When playing live a quick touch on the master can work wonders. Let me know how this works out if you try it. His advice (see link above) for wah pedals is spot on too. If its too loud ... move! LOL Happy jamming! bribrew1968
  8. Have you ever had this happen to you? You've spent the afternoon getting all your sounds perfectly tweaked for tonight's gig, but when you get there and start playing, everything sounds really..... not right? Things sound overly bright, but also a little 'woofy', so you have to fix things on the fly as the night goes along and silently curse your amp. The next day, when you set things back up at home, you go back to re-tweak your sounds, and suddenly they sound okay again. Are you going nuts? Have your ears suddenly lost it? Is there a problem with your amp? Don't worry, they're both fine; you've just been bitten by the Fletcher-Munson curves. "What's this?", you ask. "I thought Thurman Munson was a catcher for the Yankees, not a pitcher, (although he hit the curve pretty well) and who the heck is this Fletcher guy?" Well, aside from the fact that the baseball trivia part of your brain is functioning just fine, there's a whole other story going on here. Although it may look a little daunting (especially that graph you see looming below), it's really pretty simple, so just bear with us a moment for the inside poop. Fletcher and Munson were researchers at Bell Laboratories who demonstrated, in 1933, that the human ear (and brain) perceive different frequencies in a shifting manner dependent on level. Their measurements showed that your ear is most sensitive to frequencies in the range of 3-4kHz, and that frequencies above and below those points must be louder, in absolute terms, in order to be perceived as being of equal loudness. They also showed that the amount of increase of loudness in those other frequencies to achieve that perceived equality varies depending on what the overall SPL (Sound Pressure Level), or sound intensity, is in the first place. These discoveries helped kick off a whole new area of study called 'psychoacoustics' and brought you, among other things, that little button on your stereo labeled 'Loudness'. When they mapped our these curves (also known as 'Equal Loudness Contours') they looked something like this: When you look at these curves, you'll notice that when the 3-4 kHz range is at 0dB (or just barely audible), frequencies at 20Hz (about as low as you can perceive a distinct tone) have to be raised over 60 dB (which is 64 times as loud. Remember that decibels are measured on a logarithmic scale, so this is also 1000 times the power) to be perceived as being the same volume. On the other hand, when the base level for our 'home' frequencies is raised to 80dB, the lowest frequencies only have to be raised 10dB (or be twice as loud) to be perceived as being the same volume. Now what does this mean to you as a guitarist? Well, as we alluded to above, you'll notice that the curves flatten out substantially as you get louder. This means that the sounds you tweak up in your living room will have the low and high end boosted substantially (the infamous 'smile curve') to make those frequencies sound equally loud to the midrange frequencies to which you're most sensitive. When you take those sounds that you designed at around 60-70 dB (which is your basic living room, not gonna wake the neighbors or overly annoy the family level) and turn them up to the average 90dB+ stage levels, those same high and low frequencies will suddenly seem overly exaggerated making everything sound simultaneously painfully bright, yet woofy (kinda like a bad wine tasting description). Not only that, but those midrange frequencies (where the fundamental information about just which note you're playing live) are being overwhelmed by that, now excessive, high and low frequency information. So what's a fella to do? Well, if you can manage it without driving everyone crazy, studies have determined that the optimum level for reference mixing (which would apply to sound design as well) is about 85dB. This is loud enough to start flattening out the curve, but not so loud as to seriously hurt yourself (unless you do it for 14 hours straight) Get yourself an inexpensive SPL meter, set it to 'A' weighting (which shoots for the equivalent of the human hearing sensitivity) crank up your amp so you're averaging 85dB, and tweak in your patches. Of course, 85dB is, to put it in easily understandable terms, 'pretty darn loud', so this isn't something you can do a 2 AM when you can't sleep 'cause you're worrying about sounding just right for the next gig. The next best thing is to schedule a rehearsal with the rest of your band where you can crank it up, and make your final tweaks while the rest of the guys are there cracking jokes about obsessive/compulsive guitarists. Your third option, and probably the easiest, is to study the curves above carefully, and remember that if your sound is a little mid-heavy and seems a little bit dull at living room level, it's probably going to be about right when you crank that sucker up live. Here's a potential approach. Next time you're tweaking up a tone or two, make two versions; one that sounds right at living room levels, and one that you think, using the stuff you've learned here, should sound about right at stage levels. When you play live, leave the first one alone, and tweak the second one (if necessary), then go back the next day and compare the two. Pay attention to how they differ from each other. Now try and make a couple more, using the same process. After you've done this a few times, you should be getting a pretty good feel for just what you'll have to do to get 'em right the first time. Presto, you're one step closer to that elusive Ph.D in Tone. Now, if you're the type that really wants to dive in and get some serious information overload, you might want to try going here. This is one of the coolest online reference sites we've found in a long time, courtesy of Campanella Associates, an acoustic consulting firm. It's a fairly complete audio text and tutorial, that will give you more than you thought you needed to know (but not more than you should) about audio, acoustics, and sound.
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